VERISIGN INC/CA
10-Q, 2000-05-12
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING SERVICES
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<PAGE>

================================================================================

                                  UNITED STATES
                       SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
                             Washington, D.C. 20549

                             ----------------------

                                    FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

[X]   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES
      EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

                  For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2000

                                       OR

[_]   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES
      EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

        For the transition period from ______________ to _______________

                        Commission File Number: 000-23593

                                 VERISIGN, INC.
             (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

                  Delaware                               94-3221585
       (State or other jurisdiction of                (I.R.S. Employer
        incorporation or organization)               Identification No.)

     1350 Charleston Road, Mountain View, CA             94043-1331
     (Address of principal executive offices)            (Zip Code)

       Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (650) 961-7500

     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports
required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of
1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the
registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such
filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES [X] NO [_]

     Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer's classes
of common stock, as of the latest practicable date:

                                                       Shares Outstanding
                  Class                                  April 28, 2000
                  -----                                  --------------
        Common stock, $.001 par value                      115,406,231

================================================================================
<PAGE>

                               TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                            Page
                                                                            ----

                        PART I -- FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.  Condensed Financial Statements (unaudited)........................  3

Item 2.  Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial
         Condition and Results of Operations............................... 11

Item 3.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk........ 26

                         PART II -- OTHER INFORMATION

Item 6.  Exhibits and Reports on Form 8-K.................................. 27

Signatures................................................................. 28

Summary of Trademarks...................................................... 29

Exhibits................................................................... 30

                                       2
<PAGE>

PART I -- FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

      As required under Item 1 - Condensed Financial Statements (unaudited), the
condensed consolidated financial statements of the Company are provided in this
separate section. The unaudited, condensed consolidated financial statements
included in this section are as follows:

                           Financial Statement Description                Page
                           -------------------------------                ----

 .   Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
    As of March 31, 2000 and December 31, 1999.....................         4

 .   Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations
    For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2000 and 1999.............         5

 .   Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
    For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2000 and 1999.............         6

 .   Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements:

    .    Note 1.    Basis of Presentation..........................         7

    .    Note 2.    Acquisitions...................................         7

    .    Note 3.    Fair Value of Financial Instruments............         8

    .    Note 4.    Realized Gains on Investments..................         8

    .    Note 5.    Net Loss Per Share.............................         8

    .    Note 6.    Comprehensive Loss.............................         9

    .    Note 7.    Segment Information............................         9

    .    Note 8.    Recent Accounting Pronouncements...............         9

    .    Note 9.    Pending Acquisition............................        10

                                       3
<PAGE>

                        VERISIGN, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

                     CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
                       (In thousands, except share data)

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                              March 31,    December 31,
                                                                                2000           1999
                                                                           -------------  --------------
                                 Assets
<S>                                                                        <C>            <C>
Current assets:
   Cash and cash equivalents.............................................  $     108,383  $       70,382
   Short-term investments................................................         15,257          86,098
   Accounts receivable, net..............................................         33,872          22,727
   Prepaid expenses and other current assets.............................         10,094           3,635
                                                                           -------------  --------------

       Total current assets..............................................        167,606         182,842

Property and equipment, net..............................................         14,697          10,194
Goodwill and other intangible assets.....................................      1,471,823              --
Long-term investments....................................................        229,865         144,751
Deferred income taxes....................................................            909              --
Other assets, net........................................................          3,644           3,379
                                                                           -------------  --------------

                                                                           $   1,888,544  $      341,166
                                                                           =============  ==============
                  Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity

Current liabilities:
   Accounts payable......................................................  $       6,789  $        4,665
   Accrued liabilities...................................................          9,888           6,237
   Accrued merger costs..................................................          3,916              --
   Income taxes payable..................................................            978              --
   Deferred revenue, net.................................................         42,538          31,777
                                                                           -------------  --------------

       Total current liabilities.........................................         64,109          42,679
                                                                           -------------  --------------

Minority interest in subsidiary..........................................            (19)            128
                                                                           -------------  --------------
Commitments

Stockholders' equity:
   Preferred stock - par value $.001 per share
     Authorized shares:             5,000,000
     Issued and outstanding shares: none.................................             --              --
   Common stock - par value $.001 per share
     Authorized shares:             200,000,000
     Issued and outstanding shares: 115,155,518 at March 31, 2000
                                    103,482,841 at December 31, 1999.....            115             103
   Additional paid-in capital............................................      1,819,244         258,239
   Notes receivable from stockholders....................................           (721)             --
   Deferred compensation.................................................           (147)           (172)
   Accumulated deficit...................................................        (73,607)        (47,452)
   Accumulated other comprehensive income................................         79,570          87,641
                                                                           -------------  --------------

       Total stockholders' equity........................................      1,824,454         298,359
                                                                           -------------  --------------

                                                                           $   1,888,544  $      341,166
                                                                           =============  ==============
</TABLE>

     See accompanying Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

                                       4
<PAGE>

                        VERISIGN, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

                CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
                     (In thousands, except per share data)

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                           Three Months Ended March 31,
                                                                           -----------------------------
                                                                                2000           1999
                                                                           -------------  --------------
<S>                                                                        <C>            <C>
Revenues.................................................................  $      34,071  $       15,582
                                                                           -------------  --------------
Costs and expenses:
   Cost of revenues......................................................         12,462           6,601
   Sales and marketing...................................................         13,633           7,515
   Research and development..............................................          4,429           2,988
   General and administrative............................................          3,682           1,907
   Amortization of goodwill and other intangible assets..................         61,014              --
                                                                           -------------  --------------

     Total costs and expenses............................................         95,220          19,011
                                                                           -------------  --------------

     Operating loss......................................................        (61,149)         (3,429)

Other income:
   Realized gains on investments.........................................         32,623              --
   Interest income.......................................................          2,613           1,504
   Other expense, net....................................................           (389)           (318)
                                                                           -------------  --------------

     Total other income..................................................         34,847           1,186
                                                                           -------------  --------------

     Loss before minority interest.......................................        (26,302)         (2,243)

Minority interest in net loss of subsidiary..............................            147             250
                                                                           -------------  --------------

     Net loss............................................................  $     (26,155) $       (1,993)
                                                                           =============  ==============
Net income (loss) per share:

   Basic and diluted.....................................................  $        (.24) $         (.02)
                                                                           =============  ==============
Shares used in per share computation:

   Basic and diluted.....................................................        108,847          95,753
                                                                           =============  ==============
</TABLE>

     See accompanying Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

                                       5
<PAGE>

                        VERISIGN, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

                CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
                                (In thousands)

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                           Three Months Ended March 31,
                                                                                2000           1999
                                                                           -------------  --------------
<S>                                                                        <C>            <C>
Cash flows from operating activities:
   Net loss..............................................................  $     (26,155) $       (1,993)
   Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash
   provided by (used in) operating activities:
     Depreciation and amortization.......................................          2,173           1,097
     Amortization of goodwill and other intangible assets................         61,014              --
     Gain on sale of marketable securities...............................        (32,623)             --
     Minority interest in net loss of subsidiary.........................           (147)           (250)
     Stock-based compensation ...........................................             25              26
     Loss on disposal of property and equipment .........................             77              65
     Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
       Accounts receivable...............................................        (10,503)         (3,448)
       Prepaid expenses and other current assets.........................         (1,796)         (2,248)
       Accounts payable..................................................          1,236             622
       Accrued liabilities...............................................            943            (120)
       Income taxes payable..............................................             19              --
       Deferred revenue..................................................          8,352           2,901
                                                                           -------------  --------------
       Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities...............          2,615          (3,348)
                                                                           -------------  --------------
Cash flows from investing activities:
   Purchases of short-term investments...................................         (2,000)        (40,081)
   Maturities and sales of short-term investments........................         72,913          10,706
   Purchases of long-term investments....................................        (72,043)             --
   Maturities and sales of long-term investments.........................         34,705              --
   Purchases of property and equipment...................................         (3,330)         (2,344)
   Cash acquired in purchase transactions, less amounts paid.............          3,378              --
   Costs of purchase transactions........................................         (6,264)             --
   Other assets..........................................................           (339)         (2,255)
                                                                           -------------  --------------
       Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities...............         27,020         (33,974)
                                                                           -------------  --------------
Cash flows from financing activities:
   Collections on notes receivable from stockholders ....................             45             300
   Net proceeds from issuance of common stock............................          8,230         123,185
                                                                           -------------  --------------
       Net cash provided by financing activities.........................          8,275         123,485
                                                                           -------------  --------------
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash..................................             91              --
                                                                           -------------  --------------
Increase in cash and cash equivalents....................................         38,001          86,163
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period.........................         70,382          22,786
                                                                           -------------  --------------
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period...............................  $     108,383  $      108,949
                                                                           =============  ==============
Supplemental schedule of non-cash investing and financing activities:
   Unrealized gain on long-term investments..............................  $      47,776  $           --
                                                                           =============  ==============
   Common stock issued in connection with purchase transactions..........  $   1,529,741  $           --
                                                                           =============  ==============
</TABLE>

     See accompanying Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

                                       6
<PAGE>

                        VERISIGN, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

             NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 1. Basis of Presentation

      The accompanying interim unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheets
and statements of operations and cash flows reflect all adjustments, consisting
of normal recurring adjustments and other adjustments as explained in Note 2,
that are, in the opinion of management, necessary for a fair presentation of the
financial position of VeriSign, Inc. at March 31, 2000, and the results of
operations and cash flows for the interim periods ended March 31, 2000 and 1999.

      The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements
have been prepared in accordance with the instructions for Form 10-Q and,
therefore, do not include all information and notes necessary for a complete
presentation of VeriSign's results of operations, financial position and cash
flows. We filed audited consolidated financial statements that included all
information and notes necessary for a complete presentation for each of the
years in the three-year period ended December 31, 1999 in our 1999 Annual Report
on Form 10-K.

      The results of operations for any interim period are not necessarily
indicative of our results of operations for any other future interim period or
for a full fiscal year.

Note 2. Acquisitions

      On February 1, 2000, VeriSign completed its acquisition of Thawte
Consulting (Pty) Ltd. ("Thawte"), a privately held South African company that
provides digital certificates to websites and software developers. VeriSign
issued approximately 4.4 million shares of its common stock in exchange for all
of the outstanding shares of Thawte. The acquisition has been accounted for as a
purchase and, accordingly, the total purchase price of approximately $652
million has been allocated to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and
the liabilities assumed based on their respective fair values on the acquisition
date. Thawte's results of operations have been included in the consolidated
financial statements from its date of acquisition.

      On February 29, 2000, VeriSign completed its acquisition of Signio, Inc.
("Signio"), a privately held company that provides payment services that connect
online merchants, business-to-business exchanges, payment processors and
financial institutions on the Internet. VeriSign issued approximately 5.6
million shares of its common stock in exchange for all the outstanding shares of
Signio and also assumed all of Signio's outstanding stock options. The
acquisition has been accounted for as a purchase and, accordingly, the total
purchase price of approximately $876 million has been allocated to the tangible
and intangible assets acquired and the liabilities assumed based on their
respective fair values on the acquisition date. Signio's results of operations
have been included in the consolidated financial statements from its date of
acquisition.

                                       7
<PAGE>

                        VERISIGN, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

      NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS -- (Continued)

      The purchase prices of Thawte and Signio were allocated as follows:

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                                           Straight-Line
                                                                                           Amortization
                                                               Thawte          Signio         Period
                                                            -------------  -------------   -------------
                                                               (Dollars in thousands)
     <S>                                                    <C>            <C>                <C>
     Net tangible assets..................................  $         566  $       2,888        --
     ISP hosting partnerships.............................         11,389             --      2 years
     Customer relationships...............................          2,815         15,402      3 years
     Technology in place..................................          2,963          5,680      3 years
     Non-compete agreement................................            939             --      3 years
     Tradename............................................            913          4,501      3 years
     Workforce in place...................................            342          1,353      3 years
     Goodwill.............................................        632,087        854,635      3 years
     Deferred income taxes attributable to identifiable
       intangible assets..................................             --         (8,732)       --
                                                            -------------  -------------
     Total purchase price.................................  $     652,014  $     875,727
                                                            =============  =============
</TABLE>

      The following summary, prepared on a pro forma basis, combines the results
of operations as if Thawte and Signio had been acquired as of the beginning of
the periods presented, after including the impact of certain adjustments,
primarily amortization of goodwill and intangible assets.

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                            Three Months Ended March 31,
                                                                           ------------------------------
                                                                                2000           1999
                                                                           -------------  ---------------
                                                                       (In thousands, except per share data)
     <S>                                                                   <C>            <C>
     Revenues........................................................      $      34,340  $       15,955
     Net loss........................................................      $     (96,957) $     (131,822)
     Net loss per share..............................................      $        (.85) $       (1.24)
</TABLE>

Note 3. Fair Values of Financial Instruments

      The carrying amount of cash and cash equivalents, investments, accounts
receivable, and accounts payable approximate their respective fair values.

Note 4. Realized Gains on Investments

      In February 2000, the Company sold 20 percent of its interest in
Keynote Systems, Inc., and received net proceeds of $34.1 million. As a result
of the sale, the Company recorded a pre-tax gain of $32.6 million.

Note 5. Net Loss per Share

      Basic loss per share is computed using the weighted-average number of
common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted loss per share is computed
using the weighted-average number of common and dilutive common stock equivalent
shares outstanding during the period. Antidilutive common equivalent shares
excluded from diluted net loss per share consisted of options to purchase shares
of common stock totaling 15,591,397 shares with a weighted-average exercise
price of $20.17 for the three months ended March 31, 2000 and 18,863,084 shares
with a weighted-average price of $5.09 for the three months ended March 31,
1999.

                                       8
<PAGE>

                        VERISIGN, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

     NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS -- (Continued)

Note 6. Comprehensive Loss

      Comprehensive loss consists of net loss and other comprehensive income.
The components of comprehensive loss are as follows:

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                            Three Months Ended March 31,
                                                                           -----------------------------
                                                                                2000           1999
                                                                           -------------  --------------
                                                                                  (In thousands)
<S>                                                                        <C>            <C>
Net loss................................................................   $     (26,155) $       (1,993)
Unrealized gain on investments, net of tax...............................         (8,071)             --
                                                                           -------------  --------------
Comprehensive loss.......................................................  $     (34,226) $       (1,993)
                                                                           =============  ==============
</TABLE>

      Accumulated other comprehensive income presented in the accompanying
consolidated balance sheets primarily consists of the accumulated net unrealized
gain on available-for-sale investments.

Note 7. Segment Information

      VeriSign operates in the United States, Europe and Japan and derives
substantially all of its revenues from sales of Internet trust services. For the
three months ended March 31, 2000, we derived 33% of our revenue from outside
the United States and for the three months ended March 31, 1999, we derived 22%
of our revenue from outside the United States. At March 31, 2000, there had been
no significant changes as compared to December 31, 1999 in our single operating
segment or in the geographic location of our long-lived assets as a result of
our recent acquisitions.

Note 8. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

      In June 1998, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Statement of
Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 133, "Accounting for Derivative
Instruments and Hedging Activities." SFAS No. 133 established methods of
accounting for derivative financial instruments and hedging activities related
to those instruments as well as other hedging activities. Because VeriSign
currently holds no derivative instruments and does not engage in hedging
activities, we expect that the adoption of SFAS No. 133 will have no material
impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows. We will
be required to implement SFAS No. 133 for the year ending December 31, 2001.

      In December 1999, the Securities and Exchange Commission issued Staff
Accounting Bulletin (SAB) No. 101 regarding recognition, presentation and
disclosure of revenue. We believe that SAB No. 101 will not have any material
impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

      In March 2000, the Emerging Issues Task Force reached a consensus on Issue
00-2, "Accounting for the Costs of Developing a Web Site" (EITF 00-2). In
general, EITF 00-2 states that the costs of developing a web site should be
accounted for under the provisions of Statement of Position (SOP) 98-1,
"Accounting for the Costs of Computer Software Developed or Obtained for
Internal Use." We are currently evaluating EITF 00-2 and do not believe that the
pronouncement will have a significant impact on our financial position, results
of operations or cash flows. EITF 00-2 is effective for costs incurred after
June 30, 2000.

                                       9
<PAGE>

                        VERISIGN, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

      NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS -- (Continued)

      Also in March 2000, the Emerging Issues Task Force reached a consensus on
Issue 00-3, "Application of AICPA Statement of Position 97-2, `Software Revenue
Recognition,' to Arrangements That Include the Right to Use Software Stored on
Another Entity's Hardware" (EITF 00-3). EITF 00-3 addresses the accounting
issues related to software hosting arrangements. In general, EITF 00-3 states
that if the customer does not have the option to physically take possession of
the software, the transaction is not within the scope of SOP 97-2 and revenue
should be recognized ratably over the hosting period as a service arrangement.
However, if the customer has the option to take physical delivery of the
software and specific pricing information is available for both the software and
hosting components of the arrangement, then the software revenue may be
recognized when the customer first has access to the software and revenue from
the hosting component should be recognized ratably over the hosting period. We
are currently evaluating EITF 00-3 and do not expect that the pronouncement will
have a significant impact on our financial position, results of operations or
cash flows. We will be required to implement EITF 00-3 for the year ending
December 31, 2000.

      In March 2000, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued
Interpretation No. 44 (FIN No. 44), "Accounting for Certain Transactions
Involving Stock Compensation, an Interpretation of APB Opinion No. 25." FIN No.
44 will be effective July 1, 2000. This interpretation provides guidance for
applying APB Opinion No. 25, "Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees."
Management has not determined the impact that adoption of FIN No. 44 will have
on the Company's financial position or results of operations.

Note 9. Pending Acquisition

      On March 7, 2000, VeriSign announced that it would acquire Network
Solutions, Inc. ("Network Solutions"), a publicly held company that provides
Internet domain name registration and global registry services. Based on the
completion of a two-for-one stock split of Network Solutions' common stock on
March 10, 2000, VeriSign will issue 1.075 shares of its common stock for each
outstanding share of Network Solutions stock. In addition, any options or
warrants to purchase Network Solutions capital stock will be exchanged for
options or warrants, as applicable, to purchase VeriSign common stock according
to the exchange ratio. The transaction will be accounted for as a purchase. The
acquisition is subject to customary conditions of closing including approval by
both the VeriSign and Network Solutions stockholders.

                                      10
<PAGE>

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS
        OF OPERATIONS

      You should read the following discussion in conjunction with the interim
unaudited consolidated financial statements and related notes.

      Except for historical information, this Report contains forward-looking
statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and
Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These forward-looking
statements involve risks and uncertainties, including, among other things,
statements regarding our anticipated costs and expenses. Our actual results may
differ significantly from those projected in the forward-looking statements.
Factors that might cause or contribute to these differences include, but are not
limited to, those discussed in the section below entitled "Factors That May
Affect Future Results of Operations." You should carefully review the risks
described in other documents we file from time to time with the Securities and
Exchange Commission, including the Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q that we have
filed or will file in 2000 and our Annual Report on Form 10-K, which was filed
on March 22, 2000. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on the
forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Quarterly
Report on Form 10-Q. We undertake no obligation to publicly release any
revisions to the forward-looking statements or reflect events or circumstances
after the date of this document.

Overview

      VeriSign is the leading provider of Internet trust services, including
authentication, validation and payment services, needed by websites, enterprises
and individuals to conduct trusted and secure electronic commerce and
communications over IP networks. We have established strategic relationships
with industry leaders, including British Telecommunications plc, Cisco,
Microsoft, Netscape, Network Associates, Network Solutions, RSA Security and
VISA, to enable widespread utilization of our digital certificate services and
to assure interoperability with a wide variety of applications and network
equipment. We have used our secure online infrastructure to sell over 265,000 of
our website digital certificates to date. Our website certificates currently
protect the websites of a predominant number of leading online merchants, global
financial institutions, Fortune 500 companies and government agencies. We also
offer VeriSign OnSite, a managed service that allows an organization to leverage
our trusted data processing infrastructure to develop and deploy customized
digital certificate services for use by employees, customers and business
partners. Since its introduction in November 1997, we have sold over 1,000
OnSite service solutions to enterprises. We have also begun to build an
international network of affiliates who provide our trust services under
licensed co-branding relationships using our proprietary technology and business
practices. We currently have affiliate relationships with over 20 organizations
including Arabtrust in the Middle East, BT in the United Kingdom, CIBC of
Canada, CertiSur of Argentina, Certplus of France, eSign of Australia, HiTrust
of Taiwan, KPN Telecom of The Netherlands, Roccade of The Netherlands, the South
African Certification Agency in South Africa, and Telia in Sweden.

      We have derived substantially all of our revenues to date from fees for
services rendered in connection with deploying Internet trust services. Revenues
from these trust services consist of fees for the issuance of digital
certificates, fees for digital certificate service provisioning, fees for
technology and business process licensing to affiliates and fees for consulting,
implementation, training, support and maintenance services. Each of these
sources of revenue has different revenue recognition methods. We defer revenues
from the sale or renewal of digital certificates and recognize these revenues
ratably over the life of the digital certificate, generally 12 months. We defer
revenues from the sale of our OnSite managed services and recognize these
revenues ratably over the term of the license, generally 12 months. We recognize
revenues from the sale of digital certificate technology and business process
licensing to affiliates upon delivery of the technology and signing of an
agreement, provided the fee is fixed and determinable, collectibility is
probable and the arrangement does not require significant production,
modification or customization of the software. We recognize revenues from
consulting and training services using the percentage-of-completion method for
fixed-fee development arrangements or as the services are provided for
time-and-materials arrangements. We recognize revenues ratably over the term of
the agreement for support and maintenance services.

                                      11
<PAGE>

      We market our Internet trust services worldwide through multiple
distribution channels, including the Internet, direct sales, telesales, value
added resellers, systems integrators and our international affiliates. A
significant portion of our revenues to date has been generated through sales
from our website, but we intend to continue increasing our direct sales force,
both in the United States and abroad, and to continue to expand our other
distribution channels.

      On February 1, 2000, we completed our acquisition of Thawte Consulting
(Pty) Ltd. ("Thawte"), a privately held South African company that provides
digital certificates to websites and software developers. In connection with
this acquisition, we issued approximately 4.4 million shares of our common stock
in exchange for all of the outstanding shares of Thawte. The transaction has
been accounted for as a purchase and, accordingly, the results of Thawte's
operations are included in our consolidated financial statements from the date
of acquisition.

      On February 29, 2000, we completed our acquisition of Signio, Inc.
("Signio"), a privately held company that provides payment services that connect
online merchants, business-to-business exchanges, payment processors and
financial institutions on the Internet. In connection with this acquisition, we
issued approximately 5.6 million shares of our common stock in exchange for all
of the outstanding shares of Signio and we also assumed Signio's outstanding
employee stock options. The transaction has been accounted for as a purchase
and, accordingly, the results of Signio's operations are included in our
consolidated financial statements from the date of acquisition.

      On March 7, 2000, we announced that we would acquire Network Solutions,
Inc. ("Network Solutions"), a publicly held company that provides Internet
domain name registration and global registry services. We will issue 1.075
shares of our common stock in exchange for all the outstanding shares of Network
Solutions. In addition, any options or warrants to purchase Network Solutions
capital stock will be exchanged, as applicable, to purchase VeriSign common
stock according to the exchange ratio. The transaction will be accounted for as
a purchase. The acquisition is subject to customary conditions of closing
including approval by both the VeriSign and Network Solutions stockholders. The
applicable waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act
of 1976 has expired and it is currently anticipated that both companies will
hold stockholder meetings on June 9, 2000.

      As a result of our acquisitions of Thawte and Signio, we recorded goodwill
and other intangible assets of approximately $1.5 billion. These amounts will be
amortized over a two to three year period, which will adversely affect our
results of operations. If we complete our proposed acquisition of Network
Solutions, we expect to record additional substantial amounts of goodwill and
other intangible assets. We expect this amount may range from $10 billion to $15
billion. Therefore, we will experience net losses as we incur charges relating
to these assets.

      As of March 31, 2000, we had an accumulated deficit of $73.6 million.
Except for the fourth quarter of 1999, we have experienced substantial operating
losses in each fiscal period since our inception. Prior to the fourth quarter of
1999, the operating losses resulted from the significant costs incurred in the
development and sale of our Internet trust services and in the establishment and
deployment of our technology, infrastructure and practices. In the current
quarter, our operating loss is primarily due to the amortization of the
intangible assets resulting from our acquisitions of Thawte and Signio. Although
our revenues have grown in recent periods, we may be unable to sustain this
growth. Therefore, you should not consider our historical growth indicative of
future revenue levels or operating results. Because we will incur significant
charges related to the amortization of goodwill and intangible assets as a
result of our recent and pending acquisitions, we do not expect to achieve
operating profitability for the foreseeable future. A more complete description
of these and other risks relating to our business is set forth under the caption
"Factors That May Affect Future Results of Operations."

                                      12
<PAGE>

Results of Operations

      Revenues

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                2000            1999          Change
                                                            -------------  -------------  ---------------
                                                                       (Dollars in thousands)
<S>                                                         <C>            <C>            <C>
     First quarter period:
       Revenues...........................................  $      34,071  $      15,582             119%
</TABLE>

      Revenues increased significantly from the prior year primarily due to
increased sales of our Internet trust services, particularly our website digital
certificates and VeriSign OnSite services, the expansion of our international
affiliate network and delivery of more training and consulting services. In
addition, the first quarter of 2000 includes revenues from Thawte for two months
and from Signio for one month.

      No customer accounted for 10% or more of revenues during the three months
ended March 31, 2000 or 1999. Revenues of VeriSign Japan and revenues from
international customers accounted for 33% of revenues in the first quarter of
2000, and 22% of revenues in the first quarter of 1999.

      Costs and Expenses

      Cost of revenues

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                2000            1999          Change
                                                            -------------  -------------  ---------------
                                                                       (Dollars in thousands)
<S>                                                         <C>            <C>            <C>
     First quarter period:
       Cost of revenues...................................  $      12,462  $       6,601              89%
       Percentage of revenues.............................             37%            42%
</TABLE>

      Cost of revenues consists primarily of costs related to providing digital
certificate enrollment and issuance services, payment services, customer support
and training, consulting and development services and costs of facilities and
computer equipment used in these activities. Cost of revenues also includes fees
paid to third parties to verify certificate applicants' identities, insurance
premiums for our service warranty plan and errors and omission insurance and the
cost of software resold to customers.

      Growth of revenues was the primary cause of the increase in cost of
revenues from 1999 to 2000. We hired more employees to support the growth of
demand for our products and services during the period and to support the growth
of our security consulting and training activities. The cost of insurance
premiums for our service warranty plan increased because of greater certificate
volume. In addition, we incurred increased expenses for access to third-party
databases, higher support charges for our external disaster recovery program and
increased expenses related to the cost of software products resold to customers
as part of network security solution implementations. In addition, costs related
to Thawte revenues are included for two months and for Signio revenues for one
month in the first quarter of 2000.

      Cost of revenues as a percentage of revenue decreased from 1999 to 2000
primarily due to the overall increase in revenues, the experience of economies
of scale on our technology infrastructure and the efficiency gains in the
certificate enrollment and issuance process.

      Certain of our services, such as implementation consulting and training,
require greater initial personnel involvement and therefore have higher costs
than other types of services. In addition, revenues derived from our recent
acquisitions of Thawte and Signio, as well as revenues we expect to derive in
the future from our anticipated acquisition of Network Solutions, have a
different cost structure from our authentication services. As a result, we
anticipate that cost of revenues will vary in future periods depending on the
mix of services sold and historic cost of revenues may not be indicative of
future cost of revenues.

                                      13
<PAGE>

      Sales and marketing

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                2000            1999          Change
                                                            -------------  -------------  ---------------
                                                                       (Dollars in thousands)
<S>                                                         <C>            <C>            <C>
     First quarter period:
       Sales and marketing................................  $      13,633  $       7,515              81%
       Percentage of revenues.............................             40%            48%
</TABLE>

      Sales and marketing expenses consist primarily of costs related to sales,
marketing, practices and external affair activities. These expenses include
salaries, sales commissions and other personnel-related expenses, travel and
related expenses, costs of computer and communications equipment and support
services, facilities costs, consulting fees and costs of marketing programs.

      Sales and marketing expenses increased from the first quarter of 1999 to
the first quarter of 2000 as a result of the continued growth of our direct
sales force and the expansion of our marketing efforts, particularly in lead and
demand generation activities. The expansion of our international sales presence
in Europe during the second half of 1999 also contributed to the increase in
these expenses, as did the inclusion of Thawte for two months and Signio for one
month in the first quarter of 2000. Sales and marketing expenses as a percentage
of revenues decreased from 1999 to 2000 primarily due to the increase in
recurring revenue from existing customers, which tend to have lower acquisition
costs associated with them, the increase in the productivity of the direct sales
force, and the increase in the effectiveness of the marketing lead and demand
generation activities.

      We anticipate that sales and marketing expenses will continue to increase
in absolute dollars as we expand our direct sales force, increase our marketing
and demand generation activities both in the United States and abroad and
integrate our recent and pending acquisitions.

      Research and development

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                2000           1999           Change
                                                            -------------  -------------  --------------
                                                                       (Dollars in thousands)
<S>                                                         <C>            <C>            <C>
     First quarter period:
       Research and development...........................  $       4,429  $       2,988              48%
       Percentage of revenues.............................             13%            19%
</TABLE>

      Research and development expenses consist primarily of costs related to
research and development personnel, including salaries and other
personnel-related expenses, consulting fees and the costs of facilities,
computer and communications equipment and support services used in service and
technology development.

      Research and development expenses increased in absolute dollars in the
first quarter of 2000 from the third quarter of 1999 as we invested in the
design, testing and deployment of, and technical support for, our expanded
Internet trust service offerings and technology. The increase reflects the
expansion of our engineering staff and related costs required to support our
continued emphasis on developing new products and services as well as enhancing
existing products and services. In addition, the first quarter of 2000 includes
expenses related to Thawte for two months and Signio for one month. We continue
to make significant investments in development of all of our authentication,
payment and validation services. The decrease in research and development
expenses as a percentage of revenues from 1999 to 2000 is primarily due to the
fact that revenues increased faster than research and development expenses.

      We believe that timely development of new and enhanced Internet trust
services and technology are necessary to remain competitive in the marketplace.
Accordingly, we intend to continue to recruit experienced research and
development personnel and to make other investments in research and development.
We also expect to experience increased research and development expenses as a
result of our acquisition of Network Solutions. As a result, we expect research
and development expenses will continue

                                      14
<PAGE>

to increase in absolute dollars. To date, we have expensed all research and
development expenditures as incurred.

      General and administrative

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                2000            1999          Change
                                                            -------------  -------------  --------------
                                                                       (Dollars in thousands)
<S>                                                         <C>            <C>            <C>
     First quarter period:
       General and administrative.........................  $       3,682  $       1,907              93%
       Percentage of revenues                                          11%            12%
</TABLE>

      General and administrative expenses consist primarily of salaries and
other personnel-related expenses for our administrative, finance and human
relations personnel, facilities and computer and communications equipment,
support services and professional services fees.

      Our expenses increased from the first quarter of 1999 to the first quarter
of 2000 primarily due to increased staffing levels required to manage and
support our expanded operations, the implementation of additional management
information systems and related procedures, and the expansion of our corporate
headquarters. In addition, the first quarter of 2000 includes expenses related
to Thawte's operations for two months and Signio's operations for one month as
well as incremental expenses incurred to integrate the newly-acquired companies
with VeriSign. The decrease in general and administrative expenses as a
percentage of revenues from 1999 to 2000 is primarily due to the fact that
revenues increased faster than general and administrative expenses as we begin
to experience economies of scale on our corporate infrastructure.

      We expect to continue to invest in a more comprehensive executive and
administrative infrastructure. We also expect to incur costs to integrate our
newly acquired companies as well as our pending acquisition of Network
Solutions. As a result, we anticipate that general and administrative expenses
will increase in absolute dollars.

      Amortization of goodwill and intangible assets

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                2000            1999          Change
                                                            -------------  -------------  --------------
                                                                       (Dollars in thousands)
<S>                                                         <C>            <C>            <C>
     First quarter period:
       Amortization of goodwill and intangible assets.....  $      61,014  $          --              --
       Percentage of revenues                                         179%            --
</TABLE>

      In connection with the acquisitions of Thawte and Signio in February 2000,
we recorded goodwill and intangible assets of approximately $1.5 billion. These
assets will be amortized over two to three year periods. If we complete our
proposed acquisition of Network Solutions, we expect to record additional
amounts of goodwill and other intangible assets. We expect this amount may range
from $18 billion to $20 billion and that these items will be amortized
straight-line over three to four year periods.

      Other Income

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                2000            1999          Change
                                                            -------------  -------------  ---------------
                                                                       (Dollars in thousands)
<S>                                                         <C>            <C>            <C>
     First quarter period:
       Other income..................................       $      34,847  $       1,186           2,838%
       Percentage of revenues........................                 102%             8%
</TABLE>

      Other income consists primarily of interest earned on our cash, cash
equivalents and short-term and long-term investments and the net effect of
foreign currency transaction gains and losses, as well as gains on sales of
equity investments. Other income also includes charges for any gains or losses
on the disposal of property and equipment and other miscellaneous expenses.

                                      15
<PAGE>

      The increase in other income in the first quarter of 2000 compared to the
first quarter of 1999 is primarily due to a $32.6 million gain from the sale of
shares of Keynote Systems, Inc. We also had a significantly higher average cash
and investments base in the 2000 period. This increase was primarily a result of
the net proceeds of $121.4 million generated from the follow-on public offering
of our common stock during January 1999.

      We have not recorded any provision for federal and California income taxes
because we have experienced cumulative net losses since inception. As of
December 31, 1999, we had federal net operating loss carryforwards of
approximately $127.4 million and California net operating loss carryforwards of
approximately $64.5 million. If we are not able to use them, the federal net
operating loss carryforwards will expire in 2010 through 2019 and the state net
operating loss carryforwards will expire in 2004. The Tax Reform Act of 1986
imposes substantial restrictions on the utilization of net operating losses and
tax credits in the event of a corporation's ownership change, as defined in the
Internal Revenue Code. Our ability to utilize net operating loss carryforwards
may be limited as a result of an ownership change. We do not anticipate that any
material limitation exists on our ability to use our carryforwards and credits.

      We have recognized approximately $23 million of deferred tax assets in the
first quarter of 2000 to offset a deferred tax liability of an equal amount,
which arose as a result of the comprehensive income arising from the unrealized
gain on our investment in Keynote Systems. This offset related to deferred tax
assets that resulted from stock option exercises. Accordingly, a $23 million
charge in lieu of taxes was recorded to comprehensive income with an offsetting
credit to additional paid-in capital. We have provided a full valuation
allowance on our remaining deferred tax assets because of the uncertainty
regarding their realization.

      Minority Interest in Net Loss of Subsidiary

      Minority interest in the net loss of VeriSign Japan was $147,000 in the
first quarter of 2000 and $250,000 in the first quarter of 1999. The decrease
was primarily due to VeriSign Japan's lower operating losses as compared to the
prior year. As the VeriSign Japan business continues to develop and evolve, we
expect that the minority interest in net loss of subsidiary will continue to
fluctuate in future periods.

Factors That May Affect Future Results of Operations

      We have a limited operating history.

      VeriSign was incorporated in April 1995, and we began introducing our
Internet-based trust services in June 1995. In addition, we have completed three
acquisitions since 1998. Accordingly, we have only a limited operating history
on which to base an evaluation of our business and prospects. Our prospects must
be considered in light of the risks and uncertainties encountered by companies
in the early stages of development. These risks and uncertainties are often
worse for companies in new and rapidly evolving markets. Our success will depend
on many factors, including, but not limited to, the following:

      .  the rate and timing of the growth and use of IP networks for electronic
         commerce and communications;
      .  the extent to which digital certificates are used for such
         communications and commerce;
      .  the continued evolution of electronic commerce as a viable means of
         conducting business;
      .  the demand for our Internet-based trust services;
      .  competition levels;
      .  the perceived security of electronic commerce and communications over
         IP networks;
      .  the perceived security of our services, technology, infrastructure and
         practices; and
      .  our continued ability to maintain our current, and enter into
         additional, strategic relationships.

      To address these risks we must, among other things:

                                      16
<PAGE>

      .  successfully market our Internet-based trust services and our digital
         certificates to our new and existing customers;
      .  attract, integrate, train, retain and motivate qualified personnel;
      .  respond to competitive developments;
      .  successfully introduce new Internet-based trust services; and
      .  successfully introduce enhancements to our existing Internet-based
         trust services to address new technologies and standards.

      We cannot be certain that we will successfully address any of these risks.

      Our business depends on the adoption and continued use of IP networks.

      To date, many businesses and consumers have been deterred from utilizing
IP networks for a number of reasons, including, but not limited to:

      .  potentially inadequate development of network infrastructure;
      .  security concerns including the potential for merchant or user
         impersonation and fraud or theft of stored data and information
         communicated over IP networks;
      .  other security concerns such as attacks on popular websites by
         "hackers;"
      .  inconsistent quality of service;
      .  lack of availability of cost-effective, high-speed service;
      .  limited numbers of local access points for corporate users;
      .  inability to integrate business applications on IP networks;
      .  the need to operate with multiple and frequently incompatible products;
         and
      .  a lack of tools to simplify access to and use of IP networks.

      The adoption of IP networks will require a broad acceptance of new methods
of conducting business and exchanging information. Organizations that already
have invested substantial resources in other methods of conducting business may
be reluctant to adopt new methods. Also, individuals with established patterns
of purchasing goods and services and effecting payments may be reluctant to
change.

      Our market is new and evolving.

      We target our Internet-based trust services at the market for trusted and
secure electronic commerce and communications over IP networks. This is a new
and rapidly evolving market that may not continue to grow. Accordingly, the
demand for our Internet-based trust services is very uncertain. Even if the
market for electronic commerce and communications over IP networks grows, our
Internet-based trust services may not be widely accepted. The factors that may
affect the level of market acceptance of digital certificates and, consequently,
our Internet-based trust services include the following:

      .  market acceptance of products and services based upon authentication
         technologies other than those we use;
      .  public perception of the security of digital certificates and IP
         networks;
      .  the ability of the Internet infrastructure to accommodate increased
         levels of usage; and
      .  government regulations affecting electronic commerce and communications
         over IP networks.

      Even if digital certificates achieve market acceptance, our Internet-based
trust services may fail to address the market's requirements adequately. If
digital certificates do not achieve market acceptance in a timely manner and
sustain such acceptance, or if our Internet-based trust services in particular
do not achieve or sustain market acceptance, our business would be materially
harmed.

                                      17
<PAGE>

      Our quarterly operating results may fluctuate and our future revenues and
profitability are uncertain.

      Our quarterly operating results have varied and may fluctuate
significantly in the future as a result of a variety of factors, many of which
are outside our control. These factors include the following:

      .  continued market acceptance of our Internet trust services;
      .  the long sales and implementation cycles for, and potentially large
         order sizes of, some of our Internet trust services;
      .  the timing and execution of individual contracts;
      .  customer renewal rates for our Internet trust services;
      .  the timing of releases of new versions of Internet browsers or other
         third-party software products and networking equipment that include our
         digital certificate service interface technology;
      .  the mix of our services sold during a quarter;
      .  our success in marketing other Internet trust services to our existing
         customers and to new customers;
      .  continued development of our direct and indirect distribution channels,
         both in the U.S. and abroad;
      .  market acceptance of our Internet trust services or our competitors'
         products and services;
      .  our ability to attract, integrate, train, retain and motivate a
         substantial number of sales and marketing, research and development and
         technical support personnel;
      .  our ability to expand operations;
      .  our success in assimilating the operations and personnel of any
         acquired businesses;
      .  the amount and timing of expenditures related to expansion of our
         operations;
      .  the impact of price changes in our Internet trust services or our
         competitors' products and services; and
      .  general economic conditions and economic conditions specific to IP
         network industries.

      Our limited operating history and the emerging nature of our market make
it difficult to predict future revenues. Our expenses are based, in part, on our
expectations regarding future revenues, and are largely fixed in nature,
particularly in the short term. We may be unable to predict future revenues
accurately or to adjust spending in a timely manner to compensate for any
unexpected revenue shortfall. Accordingly, any significant shortfall of revenues
in relation to our expectations could cause significant declines in our
quarterly operating results.

      Due to all of the above factors, our quarterly revenues and operating
results are difficult to forecast. Therefore, we believe that period-to- period
comparisons of our operating results will not necessarily be meaningful, and you
should not rely upon them as an indication of future performance. Also, it is
likely that our operating results will fall below our expectations and the
expectations of securities analysts or investors in some future quarter. If this
happens, the market price of our common stock could decline.

      System interruptions and security breaches could harm our business.

      We depend on the uninterrupted operation of our secure data centers and
our other computer and communications systems. We must protect these systems
from loss, damage or interruption caused by fire, earthquake, power loss,
telecommunications failure or other events beyond our control. Most of our
systems are located at, and most of our customer information is stored in, our
facilities in Mountain View, California and Kawasaki, Japan, both of which are
susceptible to earthquakes. Any damage or failure that causes interruptions in
our secure data centers and our other computer and communications systems could
materially harm our business. In addition, our ability to issue digital
certificates depends on the efficient operation of the Internet connections from
customers to our secure data centers. These connections depend upon efficient
operation of web browsers, Internet service providers and Internet backbone
service providers, all of which have had periodic operational problems or
experienced outages in the past. Any of these problems or outages could decrease
customer satisfaction.

                                      18
<PAGE>

      Our success also depends upon the scalability of our systems. Our systems
have not been tested at the volumes that may be required in the future. Thus, it
is possible that a substantial increase in demand for our Internet-based trust
services could cause interruptions in our systems. Any such interruptions could
adversely affect our ability to deliver our Internet-based trust services and
therefore could materially harm our business.

      Although we periodically perform, and retain accredited third parties to
perform, audits of our operational practices and procedures, we may not be able
to remain in compliance with our internal standards or those set by third-party
auditors. If we fail to maintain these standards, we may have to expend
significant time and money to return to compliance and our business could
suffer.

      We retain certain confidential customer information in our secure data
centers. It is critical to our business strategy that our facilities and
infrastructure remain secure and are perceived by the marketplace to be secure.
Despite our security measures, our infrastructure may be vulnerable to physical
break-ins, computer viruses, attacks by hackers or similar disruptive problems.
It is possible that we may have to expend additional financial and other
resources to address such problems. Any physical or electronic break-ins or
other security breaches or compromises of the information stored at our secure
data centers may jeopardize the security of information stored on our premises
or in the computer systems and networks of our customers. In such an event, we
could face significant liability and customers could be reluctant to use our
Internet-based trust services. Such an occurrence could also result in adverse
publicity and therefore adversely affect the market's perception of the security
of electronic commerce and communications over IP networks as well as of the
security or reliability of our services.

      We may not be able to integrate our recent acquisitions successfully

      We acquired Thawte and Signio in February 2000 and in March 2000, we have
agreed to acquire Network Solutions. We could experience difficulty in
integrating the personnel, products, technologies or operations of these
companies. In addition, assimilating acquired businesses involves a number of
other risks, including, but not limited to:

      .  the potential disruption of our business;
      .  the additional expense associated with completing an acquisition and
         amortizing any acquired intangible assets;
      .  the potential impairment of relationships with our employees, customers
         and strategic partners;
      .  the additional expenses associated with the amortization of goodwill
         and other intangible assets, which we expect will be an aggregate of
         approximately $1.5 billion for the two acquisitions and will be
         amortized straight-line generally from two to three years;
      .  unanticipated costs or the incurrence of unknown liabilities;
      .  the need to manage more geographically-dispersed operations, such as
         Thawte's offices in North Carolina and South Africa;
      .  diversion of management's resources from other business concerns;
      .  the inability to retain the employees of the acquired businesses;
      .  adverse effects on existing customer relationships of Thawte or Signio;
      .  the difficulty of assimilating the operations and personnel of the
         acquired businesses;
      .  our inability to incorporate acquired technologies successfully into
         our Internet-based trust services; and
      .  the inability to maintain uniform standards, controls, procedures and
         policies.

      We face significant competition.

      We anticipate that the market for services that enable trusted and secure
electronic commerce and communications over IP networks will remain intensely
competitive. We compete with larger and smaller companies that provide products
and services that are similar to some aspects of our Internet trust services. We
expect that competition will increase in the near term, and that our primary
long-term competitors may not yet have entered the market. Increased competition
could result in pricing pressures, reduced margins or the failure of our
Internet trust services to achieve or maintain market acceptance, any of which
could harm

                                      19
<PAGE>

our business. Several of our current and potential competitors have longer
operating histories and significantly greater financial, technical, marketing
and other resources. As a result, we may not be able to compete effectively.

      We may experience future losses.

      We have experienced substantial net losses in the past. As of March 31,
2000, we had an accumulated deficit of approximately $73.6 million. Our limited
operating history, the emerging nature of our market, our current acquisitions
and the factors described under "--Our business depends on the adoption of IP
networks" and "--Our quarterly operating results may fluctuate and our future
revenues and profitability are uncertain," among other factors, make prediction
of our future operating results difficult. As a result, we may incur additional
losses in the future. Although our revenues have grown in recent periods, we may
be unable to sustain this growth. Therefore, you should not consider our
historical growth indicative of future revenue levels or operating results.

      Technological changes will affect our business.

      The emerging nature of the Internet and digital certificate businesses and
their rapid evolution requires us to continually improve the performance,
features and reliability of our Internet trust services, particularly in
response to competitive offerings. We must also introduce any new Internet trust
services as quickly as possible. The success of new Internet trust services
depends on several factors, including proper new service definition and timely
completion, introduction and market acceptance of our new Internet trust
services. We may not succeed in developing and marketing new Internet trust
services that respond to competitive and technological developments and changing
customer needs. This could harm our business.

      We must manage our growth and expansion.

      Our historical growth has placed, and any further growth is likely to
continue to place, a significant strain on our resources. VeriSign has grown
from 26 employees at December 31, 1995 to 554 employees at March 31, 2000. We
have also opened additional sales offices and have significantly expanded our
operations, both in the U.S. and abroad, during this time period. We also
expanded our operations by acquiring SecureIT during 1998 and, in February 2000
we acquired Signio and THAWTE. In addition, we will add a substantial number of
additional employees as a result of the merger with Network Solutions. To be
successful, we will need to implement additional management information systems,
develop further our operating, administrative, financial and accounting systems
and controls and maintain close coordination among our executive, engineering,
accounting, finance, marketing, sales and operations organizations. Any failure
to manage growth effectively could harm our business.

      We depend on key personnel.

      We depend on the performance of our senior management team and other key
employees. Our success will also depend on our ability to attract, integrate,
train, retain and motivate these individuals and additional highly skilled
technical and sales and marketing personnel, both in the U.S. and abroad. There
is intense competition for these personnel. In addition, our stringent hiring
practices for some of our key personnel, which consist of background checks into
prospective employees' criminal and financial histories, further limit the
number of qualified persons for these positions. We have no employment
agreements with any of our key executives that prevent them from leaving
VeriSign at any time. In addition, we do not maintain key person life insurance
for any of our officers or key employees other than our President and Chief
Executive Officer. The loss of the services of any of our senior management team
or other key employees or its failure to attract, integrate, train, retain and
motivate additional key employees could harm our business.

      We must establish and maintain strategic and other relationships.

      One of our significant business strategies has been to enter into
strategic or other similar collaborative relationships in order to reach a
larger customer base than we could reach through our direct sales and marketing
efforts. We may need to enter into additional relationships to execute our
business plan. We may

                                      20
<PAGE>

not be able to enter into additional, or maintain our existing, strategic
relationships on commercially reasonable terms. If we fail to enter into
additional relationships, we would have to devote substantially more resources
to the distribution, sale and marketing of our Internet-based trust services
than we would otherwise. Furthermore, as a result of our emphasis on these
relationships, our success in these relationships will depend both on the
ultimate success of the other parties to these relationships, particularly in
the use and promotion of IP networks for trusted and secure electronic commerce
and communications, and on the ability of these parties to market our
Internet-based trust services successfully. Failure of one or more of our
strategic relationships to result in the development and maintenance of a market
for our Internet-based trust services could harm our business.

      Our existing relationships do not, and any future relationships may not,
afford VeriSign any exclusive marketing or distribution rights. In addition, the
other parties may not view their relationships with us as significant for their
own businesses. Therefore, they could reduce their commitment to VeriSign at any
time in the future. These parties could also pursue alternative technologies or
develop alternative products and services either on their own or in
collaboration with others, including our competitors. If we are unable to
maintain our relationships or to enter into additional relationships, our
business could suffer.

      Some of our Internet-based trust services have lengthy sales and
implementation cycles.

      We market many of our Internet-based trust services directly to large
companies and government agencies. The sale and implementation of our services
to these entities typically involves a lengthy education process and a
significant technical evaluation and commitment of capital and other resources.
This process is also subject to the risk of delays associated with customers'
internal budgeting and other procedures for approving large capital
expenditures, deploying new technologies within their networks and testing and
accepting new technologies that affect key operations. As a result, the sales
and implementation cycles associated with certain of our Internet-based trust
services can be lengthy, potentially lasting from three to six months. Our
quarterly and annual operating results could be materially harmed if orders
forecasted for a specific customer for a particular quarter are not realized.

      Our Internet trust services could have unknown defects.

      Services as complex as those we offer or develop frequently contain
undetected defects or errors. Despite testing, defects or errors may occur in
existing or new Internet trust services, which could result in loss of or delay
in revenues, loss of market share, failure to achieve market acceptance,
diversion of development resources, injury to our reputation, tort or warranty
claims, increased insurance costs or increased service and warranty costs, any
of which could harm our business. Furthermore, we often provide implementation,
customization, consulting and other technical services in connection with the
implementation and ongoing maintenance of our Internet trust services and our
digital certificate service agreements. The performance of these Internet trust
services typically involves working with sophisticated software, computing and
communications systems. Our failure or inability to meet customer expectations
or project milestones in a timely manner could also result in loss of or delay
in revenues, loss of market share, failure to achieve market acceptance, injury
to our reputation and increased costs.

      Public key cryptography technology is subject to risks.

      Our Internet trust services depend on public key cryptography technology.
With public key cryptography technology, a user is given a public key and a
private key, both of which are required to encrypt and decode messages. The
security afforded by this technology depends on the integrity of a user's
private key and that it is not stolen or otherwise compromised. The integrity of
private keys also depends in part on the application of specific mathematical
principles known as "factoring." This integrity is predicated on the assumption
that the factoring of large numbers into their prime number components is
difficult. Should an easy factoring method be developed, then the security of
encryption products utilizing public key cryptography technology would be
reduced or eliminated. Furthermore, any significant advance in techniques for
attacking cryptographic systems could also render some or all of our existing
Internet trust services obsolete or unmarketable. If improved techniques for
attacking cryptographic systems are ever developed, we would likely have to
reissue digital certificates to some or all of our customers, which could damage
our reputation and brand or otherwise harm our business. In the past there have
been public

                                      21
<PAGE>

announcements of the successful decoding of some types of cryptographic messages
and of the potential misappropriation of private keys. This type of publicity
could also hurt the public perception as to the safety of the public key
cryptography technology included in our digital certificates. This negative
public perception could harm our business.

      Our international operations are subject to certain risks.

      Revenues of VeriSign Japan K.K., or VeriSign Japan, and revenues from
other international affiliates and customers accounted for approximately 27% of
our revenues in the full year of 1999 and 33% of our revenues in the first
quarter of 2000. We intend to expand our international operations and
international sales and marketing activities. For example, with our acquisition
of Thawte we have additional operations in South Africa. Expansion into these
markets has required and will continue to require significant management
attention and resources. We may also need to tailor our Internet-based trust
services for a particular market and to enter into international distribution
and operating relationships. We have limited experience in localizing our
Internet-based trust services and in developing international distribution or
operating relationships. We may not succeed in expanding our Internet-based
trust service offerings into international markets. Failure to do so could harm
our business. In addition, there are risks inherent in doing business on an
international basis, including, among others:

      .  regulatory requirements;
      .  legal uncertainty regarding liability;
      .  export and import restrictions on cryptographic technology and products
         incorporating that technology;
      .  tariffs and other trade barriers;
      .  difficulties in staffing and managing foreign operations;
      .  longer sales and payment cycles; problems in collecting accounts
         receivable;
      .  difficulty of authenticating customer information;
      .  political instability;
      .  seasonal reductions in business activity; and
      .  potentially adverse tax consequences.

      We have licensed to international affiliates the VeriSign Processing
Center platform, which is designed to replicate our own secure data centers and
allows the affiliate to offer back-end processing of Internet-based trust
services. The VeriSign Processing Center platform provides an affiliate with the
knowledge and technology to offer Internet-based trust services similar to those
offered by VeriSign. It is critical to our business strategy that the facilities
and infrastructure used in issuing and marketing digital certificates remain
secure and be perceived by the marketplace to be secure. Although we provide the
affiliate with training in security and trust practices, network management and
customer service and support, these practices are performed by the affiliate and
are outside of our control. Any failure of an affiliate to maintain the privacy
of confidential customer information could result in negative publicity and
therefore adversely affect the market's perception of the security of our
services as well as the security of electronic commerce and communication over
IP networks generally. For further information, please see "--System
interruptions and security breaches could harm our business."

      All of our international revenues from sources other than VeriSign Japan
are denominated in U.S. dollars. If additional portions of our international
revenues were to be denominated in foreign currencies, we could become subject
to increased risks relating to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations.

      We could be affected by government regulation.

      Exports of software products utilizing encryption technology are generally
restricted by the U.S. and various non-U.S. governments. Although we have
obtained approval to export our Global Server digital certificate service, and
none of our other Internet trust services are currently subject to export
controls under U.S. law, the list of products and countries for which export
approval is required could be revised in the future to include more digital
certificate products and related services. If we do not obtain required
approvals we may not be able to sell specific Internet trust services in
international markets. There are

                                      22
<PAGE>

currently no federal laws or regulations that specifically control certificate
authorities, but a limited number of states have enacted legislation or
regulations with respect to certificate authorities. If the market for digital
certificates grows, the U.S. federal or state or non-U.S. governments may choose
to enact further regulations governing certificate authorities or other
providers of digital certificate products and related services. These
regulations or the costs of complying with these regulations could harm our
business.

      We face risks related to intellectual property rights.

      Our success depends on our internally developed technologies and other
intellectual property. Despite our precautions, it may be possible for a third
party to copy or otherwise obtain and use our intellectual property or trade
secrets without authorization. In addition, it is possible that others may
independently develop substantially equivalent intellectual property. If we do
not effectively protect our intellectual property, our business could suffer.

      In the future we may have to resort to litigation to enforce our
intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets or to determine the
validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. This type of litigation,
regardless of its outcome, could result in substantial costs and diversion of
management and technical resources.

      We also license third-party technology, such as public key cryptography
technology licensed from RSA and other technology that is used in our products,
to perform key functions. These third-party technology licenses may not continue
to be available to us on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Our business
could suffer if we lost the rights to use these technologies. A third party
could claim that the licensed software infringes a patent or other proprietary
right. Litigation between the licensor and a third party or between us and a
third party could lead to royalty obligations for which we are not indemnified
or for which indemnification is insufficient, or we may not be able to obtain
any additional license on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

      The loss of, or our inability to obtain or maintain, any of these
technology licenses could delay the introduction of our Internet trust services
until equivalent technology, if available, is identified, licensed and
integrated. This could harm our business.

      From time to time, we have received, and may receive in the future, notice
of claims of infringement of other parties' proprietary rights. Infringement or
other claims could be made against us in the future. Any claims, with or without
merit, could be time-consuming, result in costly litigation and diversion of
technical and management personnel, cause product shipment delays or require us
to develop non-infringing technology or enter into royalty or licensing
agreements. Royalty or licensing agreements, if required, may not be available
on acceptable terms or at all. If a successful claim of product infringement
were made against us and we could not develop non-infringing technology or
license the infringed or similar technology on a timely and cost-effective
basis, our business could be harmed.

Year 2000 Issues

      To date, we have experienced no significant disruption of our operations
nor have our customers reported to us any significant problems with our products
or services as a result of Year 2000 issues.

                                      23
<PAGE>

Liquidity and Capital Resources

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                              March 31,     December 31,
                                                                2000            1999          Change
                                                            -------------  -------------  -------------
                                                                       (Dollars in thousands)
<S>                                                         <C>            <C>            <C>
Cash, cash equivalents and
   short-term investments.................................  $     123,640  $     156,480             (21)%

Working capital...........................................  $     103,497  $     140,163             (26)%

Stockholders' equity......................................  $   1,824,454  $     298,359             512%
</TABLE>

      At March 31, 2000, our principal source of liquidity was $123.6 million of
cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, consisting principally of
commercial paper, medium term notes, corporate bonds and notes, market auction
securities, United States government agency securities and money market funds.
In addition, we hold $80.8 million of long-term fixed maturity obligations.

      Net cash provided by operating activities was $2.5 million in the first
three months of 2000 compared to net cash used in operating activities of $3.3
million in the first three months of 1999. In the first three months of 2000,
the net loss of $26.2 million was offset by non-cash charges totaling $61.0
million related to the amortization of goodwill and other intangible assets and
was increased by the $32.6 million gain in the sale of Keynote Systems, Inc. In
addition, increases in current operating liabilities, particularly deferred
revenue, were only partially offset by increases in current operating assets.
Net cash used in operating activities in the first three months of 1999 was
primarily the result of the $2.0 million net loss and increases in accounts
receivable and prepaid expenses. These amounts were partially offset by non-cash
charges for depreciation and increases in accounts payable and deferred revenue.

      Net cash provided by investing activities was $27.2 million in the first
three months of 2000 compared to net cash used of $34.0 million in the first
three months of 1999. In the first three months of 2000, net cash provided by
investing activities was primarily the result of the sale of a portion of our
investment in Keynote Systems, Inc., partially offset by costs relating to our
acquisitions of Thawte and Signio. In the first three months of 1999, net cash
used in investing activities was substantially due to net purchases of $29.4
million of short-term investments. Capital expenditures for property and
equipment totaled $3.5 million in the first three months of 2000 and $2.3
million in the first three months of 1999. Our planned capital expenditures for
the full year of 2000 are approximately $7.0 million to $9.0 million, primarily
for computer and communications equipment and leasehold improvements. As of
March 31, 2000, we also had commitments under noncancelable operating leases for
our facilities for various terms through 2005.

      Net cash provided by financing activities was $8.3 million in the first
three months of 2000 primarily for the issuance of common stock resulting from
stock option exercises. In the first three months of 1999, net cash provided by
financing activities was $123.5 million, primarily from the sale of additional
common stock to the public.

      We believe our existing cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments,
will be sufficient to meet our working capital and capital expenditure
requirements for at least the next 12 months. However, at some time, we may need
to raise additional funds through public or private financing, strategic
relationships or other arrangements. This additional funding, if needed, might
not be available on terms attractive to us, or at all. If we have to enter into
strategic relationships to raise additional funds we might be required to
relinquish rights to certain of our technologies. Our failure to raise capital
when needed could materially harm our business. If additional funds are raised
through the issuance of equity securities, the percentage of our stock owned by
our then-current stockholders would be reduced. Furthermore, these equity
securities might have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of our
common stock.

                                      24
<PAGE>

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

      In June 1998, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Statement of
Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 133, "Accounting for Derivative
Instruments and Hedging Activities." SFAS No. 133 established methods of
accounting for derivative financial instruments and hedging activities related
to those instruments as well as other hedging activities. Because VeriSign
currently holds no derivative instruments and does not engage in hedging
activities, we expect that the adoption of SFAS No. 133 will have no material
impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows. We will
be required to implement SFAS No. 133 for the year ending December 31, 2001.

      In December 1999, the Securities and Exchange Commission issued Staff
Accounting Bulletin (SAB) No. 101 regarding recognition, presentation and
disclosure of revenue. We believe that SAB No. 101 will not have any material
impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

      In March 2000, the Emerging Issues Task Force reached a consensus on Issue
00-2, "Accounting for the Costs of Developing a Web Site" (EITF 00-2). In
general, EITF 00-2 states that the costs of developing a web site should be
accounted for under the provisions of Statement of Position (SOP) 98-1,
"Accounting for the Costs of Computer Software Developed or Obtained for
Internal Use." We are currently evaluating EITF 00-2 and do not believe that the
pronouncement will have a significant impact on our financial position, results
of operations or cash flows. EITF 00-2 is effective for costs incurred after
June 30, 2000.

      Also in March 2000, the Emerging Issues Task Force reached a consensus on
Issue 00-3, " Application of AICPA Statement of Position 97-2, `Software Revenue
Recognition,' to Arrangements That Include the Right to Use Software Stored on
Another Entity's Hardware" (EITF 00-3). EITF 00-3 addresses the accounting
issues related to software hosting arrangements. In general, EITF 00-3 states
that if the customer does not have the option to physically take possession of
the software, the transaction is not within the scope of SOP 97-2 and revenue
should be recognized ratably over the hosting period as a service arrangement.
However, if the customer has the option to take physical delivery of the
software and specific pricing information is available for both the software and
hosting components of the arrangement, then the software revenue may be
recognized when the customer first has access to the software and revenue from
the hosting component should be recognized ratably over the hosting period. We
are currently evaluating EITF 00-3 and do not expect that the pronouncement will
have a significant impact on our financial position, results of operations or
cash flows. We will be required to implement EITF 00-3 for the year ending
December 31, 2000.

      In March 2000, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued
Interpretation No. 44 (FIN No. 44), "Accounting for Certain Transactions
Involving Stock Compensation, an Interpretation of APB Opinion No. 25." FIN No.
44 will be effective July 1, 2000. This interpretation provides guidance for
applying APB Opinion No. 25, "Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees."
Management has not determined the impact that adoption of FIN No. 44 will have
on the Company's financial position or results of operations.

                                      25
<PAGE>

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Interest rate sensitivity

      The primary objective of VeriSign's investment activities is to preserve
principal while at the same time maximizing the income we receive from our
investments without significantly increasing risk. Some of the securities that
we have invested in may be subject to market risk. This means that a change in
prevailing interest rates may cause the principal amount of the investment to
fluctuate. For example, if we hold a security that was issued with a fixed
interest rate at the then-prevailing rate and the prevailing interest rate later
rises, the principal amount of our investment will probably decline. To minimize
this risk, we maintain our portfolio of cash equivalents and short-term
investments in a variety of securities, including commercial paper, medium-term
notes, corporate bonds and notes, market auction securities, U.S. government and
agency securities and money market funds. In general, money market funds are not
subject to market risk because the interest paid on such funds fluctuates with
the prevailing interest rate. In addition, we invest in relatively short-term
securities. As of March 31, 2000, 53% of our non-strategic investments mature in
less than one year.

      The following table presents the amounts of our cash equivalents and
investments that are subject to market risk by range of expected maturity and
weighted-average interest rates as of March 31, 2000. This table does not
include money market funds because those funds are not subject to market risk.

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                   Maturing in
                                  -----------------------------------------
                                                   Six Months
                                  Six Months           to         More than                     Estimated
                                   or Less          One Year      One Year        Total        Fair Value
                                  ----------       ----------     ---------      -------       ----------
                                                             (Dollars in thousands)
<S>                               <C>              <C>            <C>            <C>           <C>
     Included in cash and
       cash equivalents             77,178              --             --         77,178          77,162
     Weighted-average
       interest rate                  5.90%             --             --

     Included in short-term
       investments                  13,280           2,000             --         15,280          15,257
     Weighted-average
       interest rate                  5.69%           6.39%            --

     Included in long-term
       investments                      --              --         81,441         81,441          80,764
     Weighted-average
       interest rate                    --              --           5.96%
</TABLE>

Exchange rate sensitivity

      VeriSign considers its exposure to foreign currency exchange rate
fluctuations to be minimal. Our subsidiary in Sweden has not had significant
operations to date. All revenues derived from our European affiliates are
denominated in U.S. dollars and, therefore, are not subject to exchange rate
fluctuations.

      Both the revenues and expenses of our majority-owned subsidiary in Japan
are denominated in Japanese yen, and the revenues and expenses of our activities
conducted through South Africa are denominated in South African rand. In both
regions, we believe this serves as a natural hedge against exchange rate
fluctuations because although an unfavorable change in the exchange rate of the
foreign currency against the U.S. dollar will result in lower revenues when
translated to U.S. dollars, operating expenses will also be lower in these
circumstances.

      Because of our minimal exposure to foreign currencies, we have not engaged
in any hedging transactions to date.

                                      26
<PAGE>

PART II -- OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS AND REPORTS ON FORM 8-K

(a) Index to Exhibits

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                         Incorporated by Reference
        Exhibit                                    ---------------------------------------        Filed
        Number         Exhibit Description            Form           Date         Number         Herewith
     -------------  ------------------------       ---------      ---------      ---------       --------
<S>                 <C>                            <C>            <C>            <C>             <C>
         27.01      Financial Data Schedule                                                         X
                    (Available in EDGAR version only)

         99.01      Condensed Consolidated                                                          X
                      Statement of Operations
                    For the Twelve Months
                      Ended March 31, 2000
</TABLE>

(b) Reports on Form 8-K

    The following reports were filed on Form 8-K or Form 8-K/A during the
    quarter ended March 31, 2000:

    . Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 17, 1999 was filed on January 6,
      2000 pursuant to Item 5 - Other Events.
    . Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 1, 2000 was filed on February
      16, 2000 pursuant to Item 2 - Acquisition or Disposition of Assets, and
      Item 7 - Financial Statements, Pro Forma Financial Information and
      Exhibits.
    . Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 29, 2000 was filed on March 7,
      2000 pursuant to Item 2 - Acquisition or Disposition of Assets, and Item 7
      - Financial Statements, Pro Forma Financial Information and Exhibits.
    . Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 6, 2000 was filed March 8, 2000
      pursuant to Item 5 - Other Events.
    . Amended Current Report on Form 8-K/A dated March 10,2000 was filed March
      10, 2000 pursuant to Item 7 - Financial Statements, Pro Forma Financial
      Information and Exhibits.

                                      27
<PAGE>

                                  SIGNATURES

      Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the
registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the
undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

                                 VERISIGN, INC.


Date: May 12, 2000               By:  /s/ STRATTON D. SCLAVOS
                                     -------------------------------------------
                                          Stratton D. Sclavos
                                               President
                                                  and
                                        Chief Executive Officer
                                     (Principal Executive Officer)


Date: May 12, 2000               By:  /s/ DANA L. EVAN
                                     -------------------------------------------
                                                    Dana L. Evan
                                             Executive Vice President of
                                              Finance and Administration
                                                          and
                                               Chief Financial Officer
                                    (Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

                                      28
<PAGE>

                             SUMMARY OF TRADEMARKS

      The following trademarks and service marks of VeriSign, Inc., which may be
registered in certain jurisdictions, may be referenced in this Form 10-Q:

Trademarks

      Global Site(TM)
      Global Site Plus(TM)
      OnSite(R)
      Secure Site(TM)
      Secure Site Plus(TM)
      SecureIT(TM)
      VeriSign Logo
      VeriSign Service Center
      VeriSign Processing Center
      VeriSign is a registered trademark exclusively licensed to VeriSign, Inc.

Service Marks

      GoSecure!(SM)
      The Internet Trust Company(SM)
      The Sign of Trust on the Net(SM)
      VeriSign OnSite(SM)
      VeriSign Trust Network(SM)
      WorldTrust(SM)

      All other brand or product names are trademarks or registered trademarks
of their respective holders.

                                      29
<PAGE>

                                   EXHIBITS

      As required under Item 6 - Exhibits and Reports on Form 8-K, the exhibits
filed as part of this report are provided in this separate section. The exhibits
included in this section is as follows:

  Exhibit
  Number                          Exhibit Description
- -----------  --------------------------------------------------------
  27.01      Financial Data Schedule (Available in EDGAR version only)

  99.01      Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations
             For the Twelve Months Ended March 31, 2000

                                      30

<TABLE> <S> <C>

<PAGE>

<ARTICLE> 5
<LEGEND>
THIS SCHEDULE CONTAINS SUMMARY FINANCIAL INFORMATION EXTRACTED FROM THE
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET AT MARCH 31, AND THE CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED
STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2000, AND IS
QUALIFIED IN ITS ENTIRETY BY REFERENCE TO THESE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.
</LEGEND>
<MULTIPLIER> 1,000

<S>                             <C>
<PERIOD-TYPE>                   3-MOS
<FISCAL-YEAR-END>                          DEC-31-1999
<PERIOD-START>                             JAN-01-2000
<PERIOD-END>                               MAR-31-2000
<CASH>                                         108,383
<SECURITIES>                                    15,257
<RECEIVABLES>                                   34,954
<ALLOWANCES>                                     1,082
<INVENTORY>                                          0
<CURRENT-ASSETS>                               167,606
<PP&E>                                          26,878
<DEPRECIATION>                                  12,181
<TOTAL-ASSETS>                               1,888,544
<CURRENT-LIABILITIES>                           64,109
<BONDS>                                              0
                                0
                                          0
<COMMON>                                           115
<OTHER-SE>                                   1,824,339
<TOTAL-LIABILITY-AND-EQUITY>                 1,888,544
<SALES>                                         34,071
<TOTAL-REVENUES>                                34,071
<CGS>                                                0
<TOTAL-COSTS>                                   12,462
<OTHER-EXPENSES>                                82,758
<LOSS-PROVISION>                                     0
<INTEREST-EXPENSE>                                   0
<INCOME-PRETAX>                               (26,302)
<INCOME-TAX>                                         0
<INCOME-CONTINUING>                           (26,155)
<DISCONTINUED>                                       0
<EXTRAORDINARY>                                      0
<CHANGES>                                            0
<NET-INCOME>                                  (26,155)
<EPS-BASIC>                                     (0.24)
<EPS-DILUTED>                                   (0.24)


</TABLE>

<PAGE>

                                                                   EXHIBIT 99.01

      Pursuant to Section 11(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and
Rule 158 promulgated thereunder, set forth below is an earnings statement
covering the twelve month period ended March 31, 2000.

                        VERISIGN, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

                CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
                                (In thousands)

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                                              Twelve
                                                                                           Months Ended
                                                                                             March 31,
                                                                                               2000
                                                                                          --------------
<S>                                                                                       <C>
Revenues................................................................................  $      103,265
                                                                                          --------------
Costs and expenses:
   Cost of revenues.....................................................................          37,759
   Sales and marketing..................................................................          40,263
   Research and development.............................................................          14,744
   General and administrative...........................................................          10,515
   Amortization of goodwill and other intangible assets.................................          61,014
                                                                                          --------------

     Total costs and expenses...........................................................         164,295
                                                                                          --------------

     Operating loss.....................................................................         (61,030)

Other income:
   Realized gains on investments........................................................          38,483
   Interest income......................................................................           2,613
   Other expense, net...................................................................          (1,006)
                                                                                          --------------

     Total other income.................................................................          40,090
                                                                                          --------------

     Loss before minority interest......................................................         (20,940)

Minority interest in net loss of subsidiary.............................................             733
                                                                                          --------------
     Net loss...........................................................................  $      (20,207)
                                                                                          ==============
</TABLE>



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