FIDELITY REVERE STREET TRUST
POS AMI, 1998-06-04
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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM N-1A
REGISTRATION STATEMENT (No. 811-07807) 
 UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940    [X]
 
Amendment No. 3           [X]
Fidelity Revere Street Trust                          
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Trust Instrument)
82 Devonshire St., Boston, Massachusetts 02109 
(Address Of Principal Executive Offices)  (Zip Code)
Registrant's Telephone Number:  617-563-7000 
Eric D. Roiter, Secretary
82 Devonshire Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02109 
(Name and Address of Agent for Service)
 
TAXABLE CENTRAL CASH FUND
AND
MUNICIPAL CENTRAL CASH FUND
INVESTMENTS IN THE FUNDS ARE NEITHER INSURED NOR GUARANTEED BY THE
U.S. GOVERNMENT, AND THERE CAN BE NO ASSURANCE THAT A FUND WILL
MAINTAIN A STABLE $1.00 SHARE PRICE.
LIKE ALL MUTUAL FUNDS, THESE SECURITIES HAVE 
NOT BEEN APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED BY THE 
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION, NOR 
HAS THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE 
COMMISSION PASSED UPON THE ACCURACY OR 
ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY 
REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A 
CRIMINAL OFFENSE.
CFT-PRO-0698
 
MUTUAL FUND SHARES ARE NOT DEPOSITS OR 
OBLIGATIONS OF, OR GUARANTEED BY, ANY 
DEPOSITORY INSTITUTION. SHARES ARE NOT INSURED BY 
THE FDIC, FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD OR ANY OTHER 
AGENCY, AND ARE SUBJECT TO INVESTMENT RISKS, 
INCLUDING POSSIBLE LOSS OF PRINCIPAL AMOUNT 
INVESTED.
Funds of Fidelity Revere Street Trust
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
JUNE 4, 1998(FIDELITY_LOGO_GRAPHIC) 82 DEVONSHIRE STREET, BOSTON, MA
02109
CONTENTS
 
 
THE FUNDS IN DETAIL  2  CHARTER How each fund is organized.                    
 
                     2  INVESTMENT PRINCIPLES AND RISKS Each fund's overall    
                        approach to investing.                                 
 
                     4  BREAKDOWN OF EXPENSES How operating costs are          
                        calculated and what they include.                      
 
YOUR ACCOUNT         4  HOW TO BUY SHARES Opening an account and making        
                        additional investments.                                
 
                     5  HOW TO SELL SHARES Taking money out and closing your   
                        account.                                               
 
SHAREHOLDER AND      5  DIVIDENDS, CAPITAL GAINS, AND TAXES                    
ACCOUNT POLICIES                                                               
 
                     5  TRANSACTION DETAILS Share price calculations and the   
                        timing of purchases and redemptions.                   
 
THE FUNDS IN DETAIL
 
 
CHARTER
EACH FUND IS A MUTUAL FUND: an investment that pools shareholders'
money and invests it toward a specified goal. Each fund is a
diversified fund of the Fidelity Revere Street Trust, an open-end
management investment company organized as a Delaware business trust
on September 11, 1996.
EACH FUND IS GOVERNED BY A BOARD OF TRUSTEES which is responsible for
protecting the interests of shareholders. The trustees are experienced
executives who meet periodically throughout the year to oversee the
funds' activities, review contractual arrangements with companies that
provide services to the funds, and review the funds' performance. The
trustees serve as trustees for other Fidelity funds, including the
funds investing in Taxable Central Cash and Municipal Central Cash.
The majority of trustees are not otherwise affiliated with Fidelity.
THE FUNDS MAY HOLD SPECIAL SHAREHOLDER MEETINGS AND MAIL PROXY
MATERIALS. These meetings may be called to elect or remove trustees,
change fundamental policies, approve a management contract, or for
other purposes. Shareholders not attending these meetings are
encouraged to vote by proxy.  The transfer agent will mail proxy
materials in advance, including a voting card and information about
the proposals to be voted on. The number of votes you are entitled to
is based upon the dollar value of your investment.
FMR TEXAS AND ITS AFFILIATES
Fidelity Investments is one of the largest investment management
organizations in the United States and has its principal business
address at 82 Devonshire Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02109. It
includes a number of different subsidiaries and divisions which
provide a variety of financial services and products. The funds employ
various Fidelity companies to perform activities required for their
operation.
The funds are managed by FMR Texas Inc. (FMR Texas), which chooses the
funds' investments and handles their business affairs. FMR Texas is
located at 400 East Las Colinas Boulevard, Irving, Texas. 
As of May 31, 1997, FMR Texas advised funds having a total value of
more than $95 billion.
Fidelity investment personnel may invest in securities for their own
accounts pursuant to a code of ethics that establishes procedures for
personal investing and restricts certain transactions.
Fidelity Investments Institutional Operations Company, Inc. (FIIOC)
performs transfer agent servicing functions for each fund.
FMR Corp. is the ultimate parent company of FMR and FMR Texas. 
Members of the Edward C. Johnson 3d family are the predominant owners
of a class of shares of common stock representing approximately 49% of
the voting power of FMR Corp.  Under the Investment Company Act of
1940 (the 1940 Act), control of a company is presumed where one
individual or group of individuals owns more than 25% of the voting
stock of that company; therefore, the Johnson family may be deemed
under the 1940 Act to form a controlling group with respect to FMR
Corp.  As of May 31, 1998, all of Taxable Central Cash's and Municipal
Central Cash's total outstanding shares were held by mutual funds
managed by FMR or an FMR affiliate.  Therefore, based on his
membership in this family group, Mr. Edward C. Johnson 3d may be
deemed to be a beneficial owner of these shares of each fund.
To carry out the funds' transactions, FMR Texas may use broker-dealer
affiliates of FMR, provided that a fund receives services and
commission rates comparable to those of other broker-dealers.
INVESTMENT PRINCIPLES AND RISKS
EACH FUND'S INVESTMENT APPROACH
TAXABLE CENTRAL CASH seeks to obtain a high level of current income
consistent with the preservation of capital and liquidity. 
The fund invests only in U.S. Treasury securities and repurchase
agreements for these securities. The fund also may enter into reverse
repurchase agreements.
MUNICIPAL CENTRAL CASH seeks to obtain a high level of current income
exempt from federal income tax consistent with the preservation of
capital and liquidity. 
The fund invests in high-quality, municipal money market securities of
all types. The fund normally invests at least 80% of its assets in
municipal obligations whose interest is exempt from federal income
tax. The fund may invest all of its assets in municipal securities
whose interest is subject to the federal alternative minimum tax.
The funds comply with industry-standard requirements on the quality,
maturity, and diversification of their investments, which are designed
to help maintain a stable $1.00 share price. Of course, there is no
guarantee that the funds will maintain a stable $1.00 share price. The
funds will purchase only high-quality securities that FMR Texas
believes present minimal credit risks and will observe maturity
restrictions on securities they buy. In general, securities with
longer maturities are more vulnerable to price changes, although they
may provide higher yields. It is possible that a major change in
interest rates or a default on the funds' investments could cause
their share prices (and the value of your investment) to change.
If you are subject to the federal alternative minimum tax, you should
note that Municipal Central Cash may invest all of its assets in
municipal securities issued to finance private activities. The
interest from these investments is a tax-preference item for purposes
of the tax.
The funds earn income at current money market rates. Each fund
stresses preservation of capital, liquidity, and income (tax-free
income in the case of Municipal Central Cash) and does not seek the
higher yields or capital appreciation that more aggressive investments
may provide. Each fund's yield will vary from day to day and generally
reflects current short-term interest rates and other market
conditions.
FMR Texas normally invests Municipal Central Cash's assets according
to its investment strategy and does not expect to invest in federally
taxable obligations. Municipal Central Cash also reserves the right to
hold a substantial amount of uninvested cash or to invest more than
normally permitted in federally taxable obligations for temporary,
defensive purposes.
SECURITIES AND INVESTMENT PRACTICES
The following pages contain more detailed information about types of
instruments in which a fund may invest, strategies FMR Texas may
employ in pursuit of a fund's investment objective, and a summary of
related risks. Any restrictions listed supplement those discussed
earlier in this section. A complete listing of each fund's limitations
and more detailed information about each fund's investments are
contained in Part B of the funds' Registration Statement. Policies and
limitations are considered at the time of purchase; the sale of
instruments is not required in the event of a subsequent change in
circumstances.
FMR Texas may not buy all of these instruments or use all of these
techniques unless it believes that they are consistent with a fund's
investment objective and policies and that doing so will help a fund
achieve its goal. Fund holdings are detailed in each fund's financial
reports, which are sent to shareholders twice a year.
MONEY MARKET SECURITIES are high-quality, short-term instruments
issued by the U.S. Government, corporations, financial institutions,
municipalities, local and state governments, and other entities. 
These securities may carry fixed, variable, or floating interest
rates.  Some money market securities employ a trust or similar
structure to modify the maturity, price characteristics, or quality of
financial assets so that they are eligible investments for money
market funds.  If the structure does not perform as intended, adverse
tax or investment consequences may result. 
U.S. TREASURY MONEY MARKET SECURITIES are short-term debt obligations
issued by the U.S. Treasury and include bills, notes, and bonds. U.S.
Treasury securities are backed by the full faith and credit of the
United States.
U.S. GOVERNMENT MONEY MARKET SECURITIES are short-term debt
instruments issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury or by an agency
or instrumentality of the U.S. Government. Not all U.S. Government
securities are backed by the full faith and credit of the United
States. For example, U.S. Government securities such as those issued
by Fannie Mae are supported by the instrumentality's right to borrow
money from the U.S. Treasury under certain circumstances. Other U.S.
Government securities, such as those issued by the Federal Farm Credit
Banks Funding Corporation, are supported only by the credit of the
entity that issued them.
MUNICIPAL SECURITIES are issued to raise money for a variety of public
or private purposes, including general financing for state and local
governments, or financing for specific projects or public facilities.
They may be fully or partially backed by the local government, or by
the credit of a private issuer, or the current or anticipated revenues
from specific projects or assets. Because many municipal securities
are issued to finance similar types of projects, especially those
relating to education, health care, housing, transportation,
utilities, the municipal markets can be affected by conditions in
those sectors. In addition, all municipal securities may be affected
by uncertainties regarding their tax status, legislative changes, or
the rights of municipal security holders. A municipal security may be
owned directly or through a participation interest. 
CREDIT AND LIQUIDITY SUPPORT. Issuers may employ various forms of
credit and liquidity enhancement, including letters of credit,
guarantees, puts and demand features, and insurance, provided by
foreign or domestic entities such as banks and other financial
institutions. These arrangements expose a fund to the credit risk of
the entity providing the credit or liquidity support. Changes in the
credit quality of the provider could affect the value of the security
and a fund's share price. In addition, in the case of foreign
providers of credit or liquidity support, extensive public information
about the provider may not be available, and unfavorable political,
economic, or governmental developments could affect its ability to
honor its commitment.
VARIABLE AND FLOATING RATE SECURITIES have interest rates that are
periodically adjusted either at specific intervals or whenever a
benchmark rate changes. These interest rate adjustments are designed
to help stabilize the security's price.
STRIPPED SECURITIES are the separate income or principal components of
a debt security. The risks associated with stripped securities are
similar to those of other money market securities, although stripped
securities may be more volatile. U.S. Treasury securities that have
been stripped by a Federal Reserve Bank are obligations issued by the
U.S. Treasury.
REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS. In a repurchase agreement, a fund buys a
security at one price and simultaneously agrees to sell it back at a
higher price. Delays or losses could result if the other party to the
agreement defaults or becomes insolvent.
 REVERSE REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS. In a reverse repurchase agreement, a
fund temporarily transfers possession of a portfolio instrument to
another party in return for cash. This could increase the risk of
fluctuation in the fund's yield or in the market value of its assets.
MUNICIPAL LEASE OBLIGATIONS are used by municipalities to acquire
land, equipment, or facilities. If the municipality stops making
payments or transfers its obligations to a private entity, the
obligation could lose value or become taxable.
OTHER MUNICIPAL SECURITIES may include obligations of U.S. territories
and possessions such as Guam, the Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico, and
their political subdivisions and public corporations.
PUT FEATURES entitle the holder to put (sell back) a security to the
issuer or another party. In exchange for this benefit, a fund may
accept a lower interest rate. The credit quality of the investment may
be affected by the creditworthiness of the put provider. Demand
features, standby commitments, and tender options are types of put
features.
PRIVATE ENTITIES may be involved in some municipal securities. For
example, industrial revenue bonds are backed by private entities, and
resource recovery bonds often involve private corporations. The
viability of a project or tax incentives could affect the value and
credit quality of these securities.
ILLIQUID AND RESTRICTED SECURITIES. Some investments may be determined
by FMR Texas, under the supervision of the Board of Trustees, to be
illiquid, which means that they may be difficult to sell promptly at
an acceptable price. The sale of some illiquid securities, and some
other securities, may be subject to legal restrictions. Difficulty in
selling securities may result in a loss or may be costly to a fund.
RESTRICTIONS.  Each fund may not purchase a security if, as a result,
more than 10% of its assets would be invested in illiquid securities. 
WHEN-ISSUED AND FORWARD PURCHASE OR SALE TRANSACTIONS are trading
practices in which payment and delivery for the security take place at
a later date than is customary for that type of security. The market
value of the security could change during this period. 
DIVERSIFICATION. Diversifying a fund's investment portfolio can reduce
the risks of investing. This may include limiting the amount of money
invested in any one issuer or, on a broader scale, in any one industry
or type of project. Economic, business, or political changes can
affect all securities of a similar type. 
RESTRICTIONS: With respect to 75% of its total assets, each fund may
not purchase a security if, as a result, more than 5% of its total
assets would be invested in the securities of a single issuer.
This limitation does not apply to U.S. Government securities.
Municipal Central Cash may invest more than 25% of its total assets in
tax-free securities that finance similar types of projects. 
BORROWING. Each fund may borrow from banks or from other funds advised
by FMR, or through reverse repurchase agreements, and may make
additional investments while borrowings are outstanding.
RESTRICTIONS: Taxable Central Cash may borrow only for temporary or
emergency purposes, or engage in reverse repurchase agreements, but
not in an amount exceeding 331/3% of its total assets. Municipal
Central Cash may borrow only for temporary or emergency purposes, but
not in an amount exceeding 331/3% of its total assets.
FUNDAMENTAL INVESTMENT POLICIES AND RESTRICTIONS
Some of the policies and restrictions discussed on the preceding pages
are fundamental, that is, subject to change only by shareholder
approval. The following paragraphs restate all those that are
fundamental. All policies stated throughout Part A of this
Registration Statement, other than those identified in the following
paragraphs, can be changed without shareholder approval. 
Taxable Central Cash seeks to obtain a high level of current income
consistent with the preservation of capital and liquidity. 
Municipal Central Cash seeks to obtain a high level of current income
exempt from federal income tax consistent with the preservation of
capital and liquidity. The fund normally invests at least 80% of its
assets in municipal obligations whose interest is free from federal
income tax.
With respect to 75% of its total assets, Municipal Central Cash may
not purchase a security if, as a result, more than 5% would be
invested in the securities of a single issuer.  
Taxable Central Cash may borrow only for temporary or emergency
purposes, or engage in reverse repurchase agreements, but not in an
amount exceeding 331/3% of its total assets. Municipal Central Cash
may borrow only for temporary or emergency purposes, but not in an
amount exceeding 331/3% of its total assets.
BREAKDOWN OF EXPENSES
Like all mutual funds, the funds pay fees related to their daily
operations.  Expenses paid out of each fund's assets are reflected in
that fund's share price or dividends; they are neither billed directly
to shareholders nor deducted from shareholder accounts.
MANAGEMENT FEE
Each fund has a management contract with FMR Texas. Pursuant to each
fund's management contract, FMR on behalf of each fund, pays FMR Texas
a monthly management fee. For each fund (other than a fund for which
FMR Texas serves as sub-adviser) that invests in Taxable Central Cash
or Municipal Central Cash in a given month, FMR pays FMR Texas a fee
equal to 50% of the monthly management fee rate (including performance
adjustments, if any) that FMR receives from the investing fund,
multiplied by the average net assets invested by that fund in Taxable
Central Cash or Municipal Central Cash for the month. The fee is
reduced to reflect any expenses paid by FMR on behalf of an investing
fund pursuant to an all-inclusive fee management contract, but is not
reduced to reflect any fee waivers or expense reimbursements made by
FMR. 
OTHER EXPENSES
FIIOC performs transfer agency, dividend disbursing and shareholder
servicing functions for shares of each fund. Fidelity Service Company,
Inc., (FSC) calculates the NAV and dividends for each fund and
maintains the general accounting records for each fund. These expenses
are paid by FMR Texas pursuant to its management contract with each
fund. FMR pays FMR Texas 50% of the transfer agency and pricing and
bookkeeping expenses payable by FMR Texas. 
Each fund also pays other expenses, such as legal, audit, and
custodian fees; in some instances, proxy solicitation costs; and the
compensation of trustees who are not affiliated with Fidelity.
YOUR ACCOUNT
 
 
 
HOW TO BUY SHARES
Shares of the funds are only offered to other investment companies and
accounts managed by FMR or its affiliates.
EACH FUND'S SHARE PRICE, called NAV, is calculated every business day.
The funds are managed to keep share prices stable at $1.00.  Each
fund's shares are sold without a sales charge.
Shares are purchased at the next NAV calculated after your order is
received and accepted by FMR Texas.  NAV is normally calculated at
5:00 p.m. Eastern time.
INVESTMENTS IN THE FUNDS MUST BE MADE USING THE FEDERAL RESERVE WIRE
SYSTEM. Checks and Automated Clearing House payments will not be
accepted as a means of investment.
All wires must be received before the close of the Federal Reserve
Wire System on that day. 
HOW TO SELL SHARES
You can arrange to take money out of your fund account at any time by
selling (redeeming) some or all of your shares. Your shares will be
sold at the next NAV calculated after your order is received and
accepted by FMR Texas. NAV is normally calculated at 5:00 p.m. Eastern
time.
Redemption proceeds will be wired via the Federal Reserve Wire System
to your bank account of record. If your redemption request is received
and accepted by the transfer agent before 5:00 p.m. Eastern time,
redemption proceeds will normally be wired on or prior to the next
business day. 
A fund reserves the right to take up to seven days to pay you if
making immediate payment would adversely affect the fund.
SHAREHOLDER AND ACCOUNT POLICIES
 
 
DIVIDENDS, CAPITAL GAINS, AND TAXES
Each fund distributes substantially all of its net investment income
and capital gains, if any, to shareholders each year. Income dividends
are declared daily and paid monthly.
Income dividends declared are accrued daily throughout the month and
are normally distributed on the first business day of the following
month.
DISTRIBUTIONS
CASH. You will be sent a wire for your dividend and capital gain
distributions, if any.
TAXES
As with any investment, you should consider how an investment in a
fund could affect you.  Below are some of the funds' tax implications.
Distributions from Taxable Central Cash are subject to federal income
tax and may also be subject to state or local taxes.
For federal tax purposes, Taxable Central Cash's income and short-term
capital gain distributions are taxed as dividends; long-term capital
gain distributions, if any, are taxed as long-term capital gains.
Interest income that Municipal Central Cash earns is distributed to
shareholders as income dividends.  Interest that is federally tax-free
remains tax-free when it is distributed. However, gain on the sale of
tax-free bonds results in taxable distributions. Short-term capital
gains and a portion of the gain on bonds purchased at a discount are
taxed as dividends; long-term capital gain distributions, if any, are
taxed as long-term capital gains.
If you live outside the United States, your distributions from these
funds could be taxed by the country in which you reside. 
Mutual fund dividends from U.S. Government securities are generally
free from state and local income taxes. However, particular states may
limit this benefit, and some types of securities, such as repurchase
agreements and some agency-backed securities, may not qualify for the
benefit.  In addition, some states may impose intangible property
taxes.
Distributions are taxable when they are paid. However, distributions
declared in December and paid in January are taxable as if they were
paid on December 31.
Every January, the transfer agent will send you and the IRS a
statement showing the status of the distributions paid to you in the
previous year.
The interest from some municipal securities is subject to the federal
alternative minimum tax. Municipal Central Cash may invest up to 100%
of its assets in these securities.
A portion of Municipal Central Cash's dividends may be free from state
or local taxes. Income from investments in your state are often
tax-free to you. Each year, the transfer agent will send you a
breakdown of Municipal Central Cash's income from each state to help
you calculate your taxes.
During the first fiscal period ended May 31, 1997, 100% of Municipal
Central Cash's income dividends was free from federal income tax.
During the first fiscal period ended May 31, 1997 57.8% of Municipal
Central Cash's income dividends was subject to the federal alternative
minimum tax.
There are tax requirements that all funds must follow in order to
avoid federal taxation. In its effort to adhere to these requirements,
a fund may have to limit its investment activity in some types of
instruments. Each fund is a non-publicly offered registered investment
company which may require reporting of "phantom income" to affected
investors.
TRANSACTION DETAILS
EACH FUND IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS and its NAV is normally calculated each
day that both the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City (Kansas City
Fed) (for Municipal Central Cash) or the Federal Reserve Bank of New
York (New York Fed) (for Taxable Central Cash) and the NYSE are open.
The following holiday closings have been scheduled for 1997: New
Year's Day, Martin Luther King's Birthday, Washington's Birthday, Good
Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day,
Veterans Day,Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Although FMR Texas
expects the same holiday schedule to be observed in the future, the
Kansas City Fed, the New York Fed, or the NYSE may modify its holiday
schedule at any time. On any day that the Kansas City Fed, the New
York Fed or the NYSE closes early, the principal government securities
markets close early (such as on days in advance of holidays generally
observed by participants in such markets), or as permitted by the SEC,
the right is reserved to advance the time on that day by which
purchase and redemption orders must be received. 
 EACH FUND'S NAV is the value of a single share. The NAV is computed
by adding the value of the fund's investments, cash, and other assets,
subtracting its liabilities, and dividing the result by the number of
shares outstanding. Each fund values its portfolio securities on the
basis of amortized cost. This method minimizes the effect of changes
in a security's market value and helps each fund maintain a stable
$1.00 share price.
EACH FUND'S OFFERING PRICE (price to buy one share) is its NAV.  Each
fund's REDEMPTION PRICE (price to sell one share) is its NAV.
EACH FUND RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SUSPEND THE OFFERING OF SHARES for a
period of time.  Each fund also reserves the right to reject any
specific purchase order.  Purchase orders may be refused if, in FMR
Texas' opinion, they would disrupt management of a fund.  
WHEN YOU PLACE AN ORDER TO BUY SHARES, your shares will be purchased
at the next NAV calculated after your order is received and accepted
by FMR Texas. Note the following: 
(small solid bullet) All of your purchases must be made by federal
funds wire; checks will not be accepted for purchases.
(small solid bullet) If your wire is not received by the close of the
Federal Reserve Wire System, you could be liable for any losses or
fees a fund or the transfer agent has incurred or for interest and
penalties.
Shareholders of record as of 5:00 p.m. Eastern time will be entitled
to dividends declared that day.
WHEN YOU PLACE AN ORDER TO SELL SHARES, your shares will be sold at
the next NAV calculated after your order is received and accepted by
FMR Texas. Note the following: 
(small solid bullet) Shares of each fund do not receive the dividend
declared on the day of redemption. 
(small solid bullet) Redemptions may be suspended or payment dates
postponed when the NYSE is closed (other than weekends or holidays),
when trading on the NYSE is restricted, or as permitted by the SEC.
TAXABLE CENTRAL CASH FUND AND MUNICIPAL CENTRAL CASH FUND 
FUNDS OF FIDELITY REVERE STREET TRUST
STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
JUNE 4, 1998
This Part B: Information Required in the Statement of Additional
Information (SAI) is not a prospectus but should be read in
conjunction with the funds' current Part A (dated June 4, 1998). 
Please retain this document for future reference.  
TABLE OF CONTENTS                               PAGE  
 
                                                      
 
Investment Policies and Limitations             14    
 
Portfolio Transactions                          10    
 
Valuation                                       21    
 
Performance                                     11    
 
Additional Purchase and Redemption Information  22    
 
Distributions and Taxes                         22    
 
FMR Texas                                       12    
 
Trustees and Officers                           12    
 
Management Contracts                            27    
 
Contracts with FMR Affiliates                   27    
 
Description of the Trust                        28    
 
Appendix                                        16    
 
INVESTMENT ADVISER
FMR Texas Inc. (FMR Texas)
TRANSFER AGENT 
Fidelity Investments Institutional Operations Company, Inc. (FIIOC)
CFT-ptb-0698
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
INVESTMENT POLICIES AND LIMITATIONS
The following policies and limitations supplement those set forth in
Part A of the Registration Statement. Unless otherwise noted, whenever
an investment policy or limitation states a maximum percentage of a
fund's assets that may be invested in any security or other asset, or
sets forth a policy regarding quality standards, such standard or
percentage limitation will be determined immediately after and as a
result of the fund's acquisition of such security or other asset.
Accordingly, any subsequent change in values, net assets, or other
circumstances will not be considered when determining whether the
investment complies with a fund's investment policies and limitations.
 
A fund's fundamental investment policies and limitations cannot be
changed without approval by a "majority of the outstanding voting
securities" (as defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940 (1940
Act)) of the fund. However, except for the fundamental investment
limitations listed below, the investment policies and limitations
described in this Part B of the Registration Statement are not
fundamental, and may be changed without shareholder approval.
INVESTMENT LIMITATIONS OF TAXABLE CENTRAL CASH 
THE FOLLOWING ARE TAXABLE CENTRAL CASH'S FUNDAMENTAL INVESTMENT
LIMITATIONS SET FORTH IN THEIR ENTIRETY. THE FUND MAY NOT:
(1) with respect to 75% of the fund's total assets, purchase the
securities of any issuer (other than securities issued or guaranteed
by the U.S. government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities, or
securities of other investment companies) if, as a result, (a) more
than 5% of the fund's total assets would be invested in the securities
of that issuer, or (b) the fund would own more than 10% of the
outstanding voting securities of that issuer.
(2) issue senior securities, except as permitted under the Investment
Company Act of 1940;
(3) borrow money, except that the fund may (i) borrow money for
temporary or emergency purposes (not for leveraging or investment) and
(ii) engage in reverse repurchase agreements for any purpose; provided
that (i) and (ii) in combination do not exceed 33 1/3% of the fund's
total assets (including the amount borrowed) less liabilities (other
than borrowings). Any borrowings that come to exceed this amount will
be reduced within three days (not including Sundays and holidays) to
the extent necessary to comply with the 33 1/3% limitation;
(4) underwrite securities issued by others, except to the extent that
the fund may be considered an underwriter within the meaning of the
Securities Act of 1933 in the disposition of restricted securities;
(5) purchase the securities of any issuer (other than securities
issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or any of its agencies or
instrumentalities) if, as a result, more than 25% of the fund's total
assets would be invested in the securities of companies whose
principal business activities are in the same industry;
(6) purchase or sell real estate unless acquired as a result of
ownership of securities or other instruments (but this shall not
prevent the fund from investing in securities or other instruments
backed by real estate or securities of companies engaged in the real
estate business);
(7) purchase or sell physical commodities unless acquired as a result
of ownership of securities or other instruments;
(8) lend any security or make any other loan if, as a result, more
than 33 1/3% of its total assets would be lent to other parties, but
this limitation does not apply to purchases of debt securities or to
repurchase agreements.
THE FOLLOWING INVESTMENT LIMITATIONS ARE NOT FUNDAMENTAL, AND MAY BE
CHANGED WITHOUT SHAREHOLDER APPROVAL:
(i) The fund does not currently intend to purchase a security (other
than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or any of
its agencies or instrumentalities, or securities of other money market
funds) if, as a result, more than 5% of its total assets would be
invested in securities of a single issuer; provided that the fund may
invest up to 25% of its total assets in the first tier securities of a
single issuer for up to three business days.
(ii) The fund does not currently intend to sell securities short,
unless it owns or has the right to obtain securities equivalent in
kind and amount to the securities sold short, and provided that
transactions in futures contracts and options are not deemed to
constitute selling securities short.
(iii) The fund does not currently intend to purchase securities on
margin, except that the fund may obtain such short-term credits as are
necessary for the clearance of transactions, and provided that margin
payments in connection with futures contracts and options on futures
contracts shall not constitute purchasing securities on margin.
(iv) The fund may borrow money only (a) from a bank or from a
registered investment company or portfolio for which FMR or an
affiliate serves as an investment adviser or (b) by engaging in
reverse repurchase agreements with any party. The fund will not
purchase any security while borrowings (excluding reverse repurchase
agreements) representing more than 5% of its total assets are
outstanding. The fund will not borrow from other funds advised by FMR
or its affiliates if total outstanding borrowings immediately after
such borrowing would exceed 15% of the fund's total assets. 
(v) The fund does not currently intend to purchase a security if, as a
result, more than 10% of its net assets would be invested in
securities that are deemed illiquid because they are subject to legal
or contractual restrictions on resale or because they cannot be sold
or disposed of in the ordinary course of business at approximately the
prices at which they are valued.
(vi) The fund does not currently intend to purchase or sell futures
contracts or call options. This limitation does not apply to options
attached to, or acquired or traded together with, their underlying
securities, and does not apply to securities that incorporate features
similar to options or futures contracts.
(vii) The fund does not currently intend to make loans, but this
limitation does not apply to purchases of debt securities or to
repurchase agreements.
(viii) The fund does not currently intend to (a) purchase securities
of other investment companies, except in the open market where no
commission except the ordinary broker's commission is paid, or (b)
purchase or retain securities issued by other open-end investment
companies. Limitations (a) and (b) do not apply (i) to securities
received as dividends, through offers of exchange, or as a result of a
reorganization, consolidation, or merger.
For purposes of limitations (1) and (i), certain securities subject to
guarantees (including insurance, letters of credit and demand
features) are not considered securities of their issuer, but are
subject to separate diversification requirements, in accordance with
industry standard requirements for money market funds.
For the fund's policies on quality and maturity, see the section
entitled "Quality and Maturity" on page .
INVESTMENT LIMITATIONS OF MUNICIPAL CENTRAL CASH 
THE FOLLOWING ARE MUNICIPAL CENTRAL CASH'S FUNDAMENTAL INVESTMENT
LIMITATIONS SET FORTH IN THEIR ENTIRETY. THE FUND MAY NOT:
(1) with respect to 75% of the fund's total assets, purchase the
securities of any issuer (other than securities issued or guaranteed
by the U.S. Government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities, or
securities of other investment companies) if, as a result, (a) more
than 5% of the fund's total assets would be invested in the securities
of that issuer, or (b) the fund would hold more than 10% of the
outstanding voting securities of that issuer;
(2) issue senior securities, except as permitted under the Investment
Company Act of 1940;
(3) borrow money, except that the fund may borrow money for temporary
or emergency purposes (not for leveraging or investment) in an amount
not exceeding 33 1/3% of its total assets (including the amount
borrowed) less liabilities (other than borrowings). Any borrowings
that come to exceed this amount will be reduced within three days (not
including Sundays and holidays) to the extent necessary to comply with
the 33 1/3% limitation;
(4) underwrite securities issued by others, except to the extent that
the fund may be considered an underwriter within the meaning of the
Securities Act of 1933 in the disposition of restricted securities;
(5) purchase the securities of any issuer (other than securities
issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or any of its agencies or
instrumentalities, or tax-exempt obligations issued or guaranteed by a
U.S. territory or possession or a state or local   government, or a
political subdivision of any of the foregoing) if, as a result, more
than 25% of the fund's total assets would be invested in securities of
companies whose principal business activities are in the same
industry; 
(6) purchase or sell real estate unless acquired as a result of
ownership of securities or other instruments (but this shall not
prevent the fund from investing in securities or other instruments
backed by real estate or securities of companies engaged in the real
estate business);
(7) purchase or sell physical commodities unless acquired as a result
of ownership of securities or other instruments;
(8) lend any security or make any other loan if, as a result, more
than 33 1/3% of its total assets would be lent to other parties, but
this limitation does not apply to purchases of debt securities or to
repurchase agreements.
THE FOLLOWING LIMITATIONS ARE NOT FUNDAMENTAL, AND MAY BE CHANGED
WITHOUT SHAREHOLDER APPROVAL.
(i) The fund does not currently intend to purchase a security (other
than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or any of
its agencies or instrumentalities, or securities of other money market
funds) if, as a result, more than 5% of its total assets would be
invested in securities of a single issuer; provided that the fund may
invest up to 25% of its total assets in the first tier securities of a
single issuer for up to three business days.
(ii) The fund does not currently intend to sell securities short,
unless it owns or has the right to obtain securities equivalent in
kind and amount to the securities sold short, and provided that
transactions in futures contracts and options are not deemed to
constitute selling securities short.
(iii) The fund does not currently intend to purchase securities on
margin, except that the fund may obtain such short-term credits as are
necessary for the clearance of transactions, and provided that margin
payments in connection with futures contracts and options on futures
contracts shall not constitute purchasing securities on margin.
(iv) The fund may borrow money only (a) from a bank or from a
registered investment company or portfolio for which FMR or an
affiliate serves as investment adviser or (b) by engaging in reverse
repurchase agreements with any party (reverse repurchase agreements
are treated as borrowings for purposes of fundamental investment
limitation (3)). The fund will not purchase any security while
borrowings representing more than 5% of its total assets are
outstanding. The fund will not borrow from other funds advised by FMR
or its affiliates if total outstanding borrowings immediately after
such borrowing would exceed 15% of the fund's total assets.
(v) The fund does not currently intend to purchase any security if, as
a result, more than 10% of its net assets would be invested in
securities that are deemed to be illiquid because they are subject to
legal or contractual restrictions on resale or because they cannot be
sold or disposed of in the ordinary course of business at
approximately the prices at which they are valued. 
(vi) The fund does not currently intend to purchase or sell futures
contracts or call options. This limitation does not apply to options
attached to, or acquired or traded together with, their underlying
securities, and does not apply to securities that incorporate features
similar to options or futures contracts. 
(vii) The fund does not currently intend to engage in repurchase
agreements or make loans, but this limitation does not apply to
purchases of debt securities. 
(viii) The fund does not currently intend to (a) purchase the
securities of other investment companies, except in the open market
where no commission except the ordinary broker's commission is paid,
or (b) purchase or retain securities issued by other open-end
investment companies. Limitations (a) and (b) do not apply (i) to
securities received as dividends, through offers of exchange, or as a
result of a reorganization, consolidation, or merger.
For purposes of investment limitations (1), (5) and (i), FMR Texas
identifies the issuer of a security depending on its terms and
conditions. In identifying the issuer, FMR Texas will consider the
entity or entities responsible for payment of interest and repayment
of principal and the source of such payments; the way in which assets
and revenues of an issuing political subdivision are separated from
those of other political entities; and whether a governmental body is
guaranteeing the security. 
For purposes of limitations (1) and (i), certain securities subject to
guarantees (including insurance, letters of credit and demand
features) are not considered securities of their issuer, but are
subject to separate diversification requirements, in accordance with
industry standard requirements for money market funds.
The following pages contain more detailed information about types of
instruments in which a fund may invest, strategies FMR Texas may
employ in pursuit of a fund's investment objective, and a summary of
related risks.  FMR Texas may not buy all of these instruments or use
all of these techniques unless it believes that doing so will help the
fund achieve its goal.
AFFILIATED BANK TRANSACTIONS. A fund may engage in transactions with
financial institutions that are, or may be considered to be,
"affiliated persons" of the fund under the 1940 Act. These
transactions may include repurchase agreements with custodian banks;
short-term obligations of, and repurchase agreements with, the 50
largest U.S. banks (measured by deposits); municipal securities; U.S.
Government securities with affiliated financial institutions that are
primary dealers in these securities; short-term currency transactions;
and short-term borrowings. In accordance with exemptive orders issued
by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Board of Trustees
has established and periodically reviews procedures applicable to
transactions involving affiliated financial institutions.
ASSET-BACKED SECURITIES include pools of mortgages, loans,
receivables, or other assets. Payment of principal and interest may be
largely dependent upon the cash flows generated by the assets backing
the securities and, in certain cases, supported by letters of credit,
surety bonds, or other credit enhancements. The value of asset-backed
securities may also be affected by the creditworthiness of the
servicing agent for the pool, the originator of the loans or
receivables, or the entities providing the credit support.
DELAYED-DELIVERY TRANSACTIONS. Each fund may buy and sell securities
on a delayed-delivery or when-issued basis. These transactions involve
a commitment by a fund to purchase or sell specific securities at a
predetermined price or yield, with payment and delivery taking place
after the customary settlement period for that type of security.
Typically, no interest accrues to the purchaser until the security is
delivered.
When purchasing securities on a delayed-delivery basis, each fund
assumes the rights and risks of ownership, including the risk of price
and yield fluctuations. Because a fund is not required to pay for
securities until the delivery date, these risks are in addition to the
risks associated with the fund's other investments. If a fund remains
substantially fully invested at a time when delayed-delivery purchases
are outstanding, the delayed-delivery purchases may result in a form
of leverage. When delayed-delivery purchases are outstanding, the fund
will set aside appropriate liquid assets in a segregated custodial
account to cover its purchase obligations. When a fund has sold a
security on a delayed-delivery basis, the fund does not participate in
further gains or losses with respect to the security. If the other
party to a delayed-delivery transaction fails to deliver or pay for
the securities, the fund could miss a favorable price or yield
opportunity, or could suffer a loss.
FEDERALLY TAXABLE OBLIGATIONS. Under normal conditions, Municipal
Central Cash does not intend to invest in securities whose interest is
federally taxable. However, from time to time on a temporary basis,
Municipal Central Cash may invest a portion of its assets in
fixed-income obligations whose interest is subject to federal income
tax. 
Should Municipal Central Cash invest in federally taxable obligations,
it would purchase securities that, in FMR Texas' judgment, are of high
quality. These obligations would include those issued or guaranteed by
the U.S. Government or its agencies or instrumentalities and
repurchase agreements backed by such obligations.
Proposals to restrict or eliminate the federal income tax exemption
for interest on municipal obligations are introduced before Congress
from time to time. Proposals also may be introduced before state
legislatures that would affect the state tax treatment of Municipal
Central Cash's distributions. If such proposals were enacted, the
availability of municipal obligations and the value of Municipal
Central Cash's holdings would be affected and the Trustees would
reevaluate Municipal Central Cash's investment objectives and
policies. 
ILLIQUID INVESTMENTS are investments that cannot be sold or disposed
of in the ordinary course of business at approximately the prices at
which they are valued. Under the supervision of the Board of Trustees,
FMR Texas determines the liquidity of a fund's investments and,
through reports from FMR Texas, the Board monitors investments in
illiquid instruments. In determining the liquidity of a fund's
investments, FMR Texas may consider various factors, including (1) the
frequency of trades and quotations, (2) the number of dealers and
prospective purchasers in the marketplace, (3) dealer undertakings to
make a market, (4) the nature of the security (including any demand or
tender features), and (5) the nature of the marketplace for trades
(including the ability to assign or offset the fund's rights and
obligations relating to the investment).
Investments currently considered by the funds to be illiquid include
repurchase agreements not entitling the holder to payment of principal
and interest within seven days. Also, FMR Texas may determine some
restricted securities, municipal lease obligations, and time deposits
to be illiquid.
In the absence of market quotations, illiquid investments are valued
for purposes of monitoring amortized cost valuation at fair value as
determined in good faith by a committee appointed by the Board of
Trustees. If through a change in values, net assets, or other
circumstances, a fund were in a position where more than 10% of its
net assets were invested in illiquid securities, it would seek to take
appropriate steps to protect liquidity.
MONEY MARKET SECURITIES are high-quality, short-term obligations. Some
money market securities employ a trust or other similar structure to
modify the maturity, price characteristics, or quality of financial
assets. For example, put features can be used to modify the maturity
of a security, or interest rate adjustment features can be used to
enhance price stability. If the structure does not perform as
intended, adverse tax or investment consequences may result. Neither
the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) nor any other regulatory authority
has ruled definitively on certain legal issues presented by structured
securities. Future tax or other regulatory determinations could
adversely affect the value, liquidity, or tax treatment of the income
received from these securities or the nature and timing of
distributions made by the funds. 
MUNICIPAL LEASES and participation interests therein may take the form
of a lease, an installment purchase, or a conditional sale contract
and are issued by state and local governments and authorities to
acquire land or a wide variety of equipment and facilities. Generally,
the funds will not hold such obligations directly as a lessor of the
property, but will purchase a participation interest in a municipal
obligation from a bank or other third party. A participation interest
gives a fund a specified, undivided interest in the obligation in
proportion to its purchased interest in the total amount of the
obligation.
Municipal leases frequently have risks distinct from those associated
with general obligation or revenue bonds. State constitutions and
statutes set forth requirements that states or municipalities must
meet to incur debt. These may include voter referenda, interest rate
limits, or public sale requirements. Leases, installment purchases, or
conditional sale contracts (which normally provide for title to the
leased asset to pass to the governmental issuer) have evolved as a
means for governmental issuers to acquire property and equipment
without meeting their constitutional and statutory requirements for
the issuance of debt. Many leases and contracts include
"non-appropriation clauses" providing that the governmental issuer has
no obligation to make future payments under the lease or contract
unless money is appropriated for such purposes by the appropriate
legislative body on a yearly or other periodic basis.
Non-appropriation clauses free the issuer from debt issuance
limitations. 
 MARKET DISRUPTION RISK. The value of municipal securities may be
affected by uncertainties in the municipal market related to
legislation or litigation involving the taxation of municipal
securities or the rights of municipal securities holders in the event
of a bankruptcy. Municipal bankruptcies are relatively rare, and
certain provisions of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code governing such
bankruptcies are unclear and remain untested. Further, the application
of state law to municipal issuers could produce varying results among
the states or among municipal securities issuers within a state. These
legal uncertainties could affect the municipal securities market
generally, certain specific segments of the market, or the relative
credit quality of particular securities. Any of these effects could
have a significant impact on the prices of some or all of the
municipal securities held by a fund, making it more difficult for the
fund to maintain a stable net asset value per share.
MUNICIPAL SECTORS:
ELECTRIC UTILITIES INDUSTRY. The electric utilities industry has been
experiencing, and will continue to experience, increased competitive
pressures. Federal legislation in the last two years will open
transmission access to any electricity supplier, although it is not
presently known to what extent competition will evolve. Other risks
include: (a) the availability and cost of fuel, (b) the availability
and cost of capital, (c) the effects of conservation on energy demand,
(d) the effects of rapidly changing environmental, safety, and
licensing requirements, and other federal, state, and local
regulations, (e) timely and sufficient rate increases, and (f)
opposition to nuclear power.
HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY. The health care industry is subject to
regulatory action by a number of private and governmental agencies,
including federal, state, and local governmental agencies. A major
source of revenues for the health care industry is payments from the
Medicare and Medicaid programs. As a result, the industry is sensitive
to legislative changes and reductions in governmental spending for
such programs. Numerous other factors may affect the industry, such as
general and local economic conditions; demand for services; expenses
(including malpractice insurance premiums); and competition among
health care providers. In the future, the following elements may
adversely affect health care facility operations: adoption of
legislation proposing a national health insurance program; other state
or local health care reform measures; medical and technological
advances which dramatically alter the need for health services or the
way in which such services are delivered; changes in medical coverage
which alter the traditional fee-for-service revenue stream; and
efforts by employers, insurers, and governmental agencies to reduce
the costs of health insurance and health care services.
HOUSING. Housing revenue bonds are generally issued by a state,
county, city, local housing authority, or other public agency. They
generally are secured by the revenues derived from mortgages purchased
with the proceeds of the bond issue. It is extremely difficult to
predict the supply of available mortgages to be purchased with the
proceeds of an issue or the future cash flow from the underlying
mortgages. Consequently, there are risks that proceeds will exceed
supply, resulting in early retirement of bonds, or that homeowner
repayments will create an irregular cash flow. Many factors may affect
the financing of multi-family housing projects, including acceptable
completion of construction, proper management, occupancy and rent
levels, economic conditions, and changes to current laws and
regulations.
EDUCATION. In general, there are two types of education-related bonds;
those issued to finance projects for public and private colleges and
universities, and those representing pooled interests in student
loans. Bonds issued to supply educational institutions with funds are
subject to the risk of unanticipated revenue decline, primarily the
result of decreasing student enrollment or decreasing state and
federal funding. Among the factors that may lead to declining or
insufficient revenues are restrictions on students' ability to pay
tuition, availability of state and federal funding, and general
economic conditions. Student loan revenue bonds are generally offered
by state (or substate) authorities or commissions and are backed by
pools of student loans. Underlying student loans may be guaranteed by
state guarantee agencies and may be subject to reimbursement by the
United States Department of Education through its guaranteed student
loan program. Others may be private, uninsured loans made to parents
or students which are supported by reserves or other forms of credit
enhancement. Recoveries of principal due to loan defaults may be
applied to redemption of bonds or may be used to re-lend, depending on
program latitude and demand for loans. Cash flows supporting student
loan revenue bonds are impacted by numerous factors, including the
rate of student loan defaults, seasoning of the loan portfolio, and
student repayment deferral during periods of forbearance. Other risks
associated with student loan revenue bonds include potential changes
in federal legislation regarding student loan revenue bonds, state
guarantee agency reimbursement and continued federal interest and
other program subsidies currently in effect.
WATER AND SEWER. Water and sewer revenue bonds are often considered to
have relatively secure credit as a result of their issuer's
importance, monopoly status, and generally unimpeded ability to raise
rates. Despite this, lack of water supply due to insufficient rain,
run-off, or snow pack is a concern that has led to past defaults.
Further, public resistance to rate increases, costly environmental
litigation, and Federal environmental mandates are challenges faced by
issuers of water and sewer bonds.
TRANSPORTATION. Transportation debt may be issued to finance the
construction of airports, toll roads, highways, or other transit
facilities. Airport bonds are dependent on the general stability of
the airline industry and on the stability of a specific carrier who
uses the airport as a hub. Air traffic generally follows broader
economic trends and is also affected by the price and availability of
fuel. Toll road bonds are also affected by the cost and availability
of fuel as well as toll levels, the presence of competing roads, and
the general economic health of an area. Fuel costs and availability
also affect other transportation-related securities, as does the
presence of alternate forms of transportation, such as public
transportation.
PUT FEATURES entitle the holder to sell a security back to the issuer
or a third party at any time or at specified intervals. They are
subject to the risk that the put provider is unable to honor the put
feature (purchase the security). Put providers often support their
ability to buy securities on demand by obtaining letters of credit or
other guarantees from other entities. Demand features, standby
commitments, and tender options are types of put features. 
QUALITY AND MATURITY. Pursuant to procedures adopted by the Board of
Trustees, the funds may purchase only high-quality securities that FMR
Texas believes present minimal credit risks. To be considered
high-quality, a security must be rated in accordance with applicable
rules in one of the two highest categories for short-term securities
by at least two nationally recognized rating services (or by one, if
only one rating service has rated the security); or, if unrated,
judged to be of equivalent quality by FMR Texas.
High-quality securities are divided into "first tier" and "second
tier" securities. First tier securities are those deemed to be in the
highest rating category (e.g., Standard & Poor's A-1 or SP-1), and
second tier securities are those deemed to be in the second highest
rating category (e.g., Standard & Poor's A-2 or SP-2). Split-rated
securities may be determined to be either first or second tier based
on applicable regulations.
Taxable Central Cash may not invest more than 5% of its total assets
in second tier securities. In addition, Taxable Central Cash may not
invest more than 1% of its total assets or $1 million (whichever is
greater) in the second tier securities of a single issuer.
Each fund currently intends to limit its investments to securities
with remaining maturities of 397 days or less, and to maintain a
dollar-weighted average maturity of 90 days or less. When determining
the maturity of a security, a fund may look to an interest rate reset
or demand feature.
REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS. In a repurchase agreement, a fund purchases a
security and simultaneously commits to sell that security back to the
original seller at an agreed-upon price. The resale price reflects the
purchase price plus an agreed-upon incremental amount which is
unrelated to the coupon rate or maturity of the purchased security. To
protect a fund from the risk that the original seller will not fulfill
its obligation, the securities are held in an account of the fund at a
bank, marked-to-market daily, and maintained at a value at least equal
to the sale price plus the accrued incremental amount. While it does
not presently appear possible to eliminate all risks from these
transactions (particularly the possibility that the value of the
underlying security will be less than the resale price, as well as
delays and costs to a fund in connection with bankruptcy proceedings),
it is each fund's current policy to engage in repurchase agreement
transactions with parties whose creditworthiness has been reviewed and
found satisfactory by FMR Texas.
REVERSE REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS. In a reverse repurchase agreement, a
fund sells a portfolio instrument to another party, such as a bank or
broker-dealer, in return for cash and agrees to repurchase the
instrument at a particular price and time. While a reverse repurchase
agreement is outstanding, the fund will maintain appropriate liquid
assets in a segregated custodial account to cover its obligation under
the agreement. A fund will enter into reverse repurchase agreements
only with parties whose creditworthiness has been found satisfactory
by FMR. Such transactions may increase fluctuations in the market
value of the fund's assets and may be viewed as a form of leverage.
RESTRICTED SECURITIES generally can be sold in privately negotiated
transactions, pursuant to an exemption from registration under the
Securities Act of 1933, or in a registered public offering. Where
registration is required, a fund may be obligated to pay all or part
of the registration expense and a considerable period may elapse
between the time it decides to seek registration and the time it may
be permitted to sell a security under an effective registration
statement. If, during such a period, adverse market conditions were to
develop, a fund might obtain a less favorable price than prevailed
when it decided to seek registration of the security. However, in
general, each fund anticipates holding restricted securities to
maturity or selling them in an exempt transaction.
SHORT SALES "AGAINST THE BOX." A fund may sell securities short when
it owns or has the right to obtain securities equivalent in kind or
amount to the securities sold short. Short sales could be used to
protect the net asset value per share of the fund in anticipation of
increased interest rates, without sacrificing the current yield of the
securities sold short. If a fund enters into a short sale against the
box, it will be required to set aside securities equivalent in kind
and amount to the securities sold short (or securities convertible or
exchangeable into such securities) and will be required to hold such
securities while the short sale is outstanding. The fund will incur
transaction costs, including interest expenses, in connection with
opening, maintaining, and closing short sales against the box.
SOURCES OF CREDIT OR LIQUIDITY SUPPORT. FMR Texas may rely on its
evaluation of the credit of a bank or another entity in determining
whether to purchase a security supported by a letter of credit
guarantee, insurance or other source of credit or liquidity. In
evaluating the credit of a foreign bank or other foreign entities, FMR
Texas will consider whether adequate public information about the
entity is available and whether the entity may be subject to
unfavorable political or economic developments, currency controls, or
other government restrictions that might affect its ability to honor
its commitment.
STRIPPED GOVERNMENT SECURITIES. Stripped government securities are
created by separating the income and principal components of a U.S.
Government Security and selling them separately. STRIPS (Separate
Trading of Registered Interest and Principal of Securities) are
created when the coupon payments and the principal payment are
stripped from an outstanding Treasury Security by a Federal Reserve
Bank.
VARIABLE AND FLOATING RATE SECURITIES provide for periodic adjustments
of the interest rate paid on the security. Variable rate securities
provide for a specified periodic adjustment in the interest rate,
while floating rate securities have interest rates that change
whenever there is a change in a designated benchmark rate. Some
variable or floating rate securities have put features.
ZERO COUPON BONDS do not make regular interest payments. Instead, they
are sold at a deep discount from their face value and are redeemed at
face value when they mature. Because zero coupon bonds do not pay
current income, their prices can be very volatile when interest rates
change. In calculating its daily dividend, a fund takes into account
as income a portion of the difference between a zero coupon bond's
purchase price and its face value.
PORTFOLIO TRANSACTIONS
All orders for the purchase or sale of portfolio securities are placed
on behalf of each fund by FMR Texas pursuant to authority contained in
the fund's management contract. FMR Texas is authorized to place
orders for the purchase and sale of portfolio securities, and will do
so in accordance with the policies described below. FMR Texas is also
responsible for the placement of transaction orders for other
investment companies and accounts for which it or its affiliates act
as investment adviser or sub-adviser. Securities purchased and sold by
a fund generally will be traded on a net basis (i.e., without
commission). In selecting broker-dealers, subject to applicable
limitations of the federal securities laws, FMR Texas considers
various relevant factors, including, but not limited to, the size and
type of the transaction; the nature and character of the markets for
the security to be purchased or sold; the execution efficiency,
settlement capability, and financial condition of the broker-dealer
firm; the broker-dealer's execution services rendered on a continuing
basis; and the reasonableness of any commissions.
The funds may execute portfolio transactions with broker-dealers who
provide research and execution services to the funds or other accounts
over which FMR or its affiliates exercise investment discretion. Such
services may include advice concerning the value of securities; the
advisability of investing in, purchasing, or selling securities; and
the availability of securities or the purchasers or sellers of
securities. In addition, such broker-dealers may furnish analyses and
reports concerning issuers, industries, securities, economic factors
and trends, portfolio strategy, and performance of accounts; effect
securities transactions, and perform functions incidental thereto
(such as clearance and settlement). FMR maintains a listing of
broker-dealers who provide such services on a regular basis. However,
as many transactions on behalf of the funds are placed with
broker-dealers (including broker-dealers on the list) without regard
to the furnishing of such services, it is not possible to estimate the
proportion of such transactions directed to such broker-dealers solely
because such services were provided. The selection of such
broker-dealers generally is made by FMR Texas (to the extent possible
consistent with execution considerations) based upon the quality of
research and execution services provided.
The receipt of research from broker-dealers that execute transactions
on behalf of the funds may be useful to FMR Texas in rendering
investment management services to the funds or its other clients, and
conversely, such research provided by broker-dealers who have executed
transaction orders on behalf of other FMR Texas clients may be useful
to FMR Texas in carrying out its obligations to the funds. The receipt
of such research has not reduced FMR Texas' normal independent
research activities; however, it enables FMR Texas to avoid the
additional expenses that could be incurred if FMR Texas tried to
develop comparable information through its own efforts.
Subject to applicable limitations of the federal securities laws,
broker-dealers may receive commissions for agency transactions that
are in excess of the amount of commissions charged by other
broker-dealers in recognition of their research and execution
services. In order to cause each fund to pay such higher commissions,
FMR Texas must determine in good faith that such commissions are
reasonable in relation to the value of the brokerage and research
services provided by such executing broker-dealers, viewed in terms of
a particular transaction or FMR Texas' overall responsibilities to the
funds and its other clients. In reaching this determination, FMR Texas
will not attempt to place a specific dollar value on the brokerage and
research services provided, or to determine what portion of the
compensation should be related to those services.
FMR Texas is authorized to use research services provided by and to
place portfolio transactions with brokerage firms that have provided
assistance in the distribution of shares of the funds or shares of
other Fidelity funds to the extent permitted by law. FMR Texas may use
research services provided by and place agency transactions with
National Financial Services Corporation (NFSC) and Fidelity Brokerage
Services (FBS), indirect subsidiaries of FMR Corp., if the commissions
are fair, reasonable, and comparable to commissions charged by
non-affiliated, qualified brokerage firms for similar services. From
September 1992 through December 1994, FBS operated under the name
Fidelity Brokerage Services Limited (FBSL). As of January 1995, FBSL
was converted to an unlimited liability company and assumed the name
FBS. 
Section 11(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 prohibits members
of national securities exchanges from executing exchange transactions
for accounts which they or their affiliates manage, unless certain
requirements are satisfied. Pursuant to such requirements, the Board
of Trustees has authorized NFSC to execute portfolio transactions on
national securities exchanges in accordance with approved procedures
and applicable SEC rules.
Each fund's Trustees periodically review FMR Texas' performance of its
responsibilities in connection with the placement of portfolio
transactions on behalf of the funds and review the commissions paid by
each fund over representative periods of time to determine if they are
reasonable in relation to the benefits to the fund.
For the fiscal year ended May 31, 1997, Taxable Central Cash Fund and
Municipal Central Cash Fund paid no brokerage commissions.
During the fiscal year ended May 31, 1997, the funds paid no fees to
brokerage firms that provided research services.
From time to time the Trustees will review whether the recapture for
the benefit of the funds of some portion of the brokerage commissions
or similar fees paid by the funds on portfolio transactions is legally
permissible and advisable. Each fund seeks to recapture soliciting
broker-dealer fees on the tender of portfolio securities, but at
present no other recapture arrangements are in effect. The Trustees
intend to continue to review whether recapture opportunities are
available and are legally permissible and, if so, to determine in the
exercise of their business judgment whether it would be advisable for
each fund to seek such recapture.
Although the Trustees and officers of each fund are substantially the
same as those of other funds managed by FMR, investment decisions for
each fund are made independently from those of other funds managed by
FMR or accounts managed by FMR affiliates. It sometimes happens that
the same security is held in the portfolio of more than one of these
funds or accounts. Simultaneous transactions are inevitable when
several funds and accounts are managed by the same investment adviser,
particularly when the same security is suitable for the investment
objective of more than one fund or account.
When two or more funds are simultaneously engaged in the purchase or
sale of the same security, the prices and amounts are allocated in
accordance with procedures believed to be appropriate and equitable
for each fund. In some cases this system could have a detrimental
effect on the price or value of the security as far as each fund is
concerned. In other cases, however, the ability of the funds to
participate in volume transactions will produce better executions and
prices for the funds. It is the current opinion of the Trustees that
the desirability of retaining FMR Texas as investment adviser to each
fund outweighs any disadvantages that may be said to exist from
exposure to simultaneous transactions.
VALUATION
Fidelity Service Company, Inc. (FSC) normally determines each fund's
net asset value per share (NAV) at 5 p.m. Eastern time. The valuation
of portfolio securities is determined as of this time for the purpose
of computing each fund's NAV.
Portfolio securities and other assets are valued on the basis of
amortized cost. This technique involves initially valuing an
instrument at its cost as adjusted for amortization of premium or
accretion of discount rather than its current market value. The
amortized cost value of an instrument may be higher or lower than the
price a fund would receive if it sold the instrument.
During periods of declining interest rates, a fund's yield based on
amortized cost valuation may be higher than would result if the fund
used market valuations to determine its NAV. The converse would apply
during periods of rising interest rates. 
Valuing each fund's investments on the basis of amortized cost and use
of the term "money market fund" are permitted pursuant to Rule 2a-7
under the 1940 Act. Each fund must adhere to certain conditions under
Rule 2a-7, as summarized in the section entitled "Quality and
Maturity" on page 18.
The Board of Trustees oversees FMR Texas' adherence to the provisions
of Rule 2a-7 and has established procedures designed to stabilize each
fund's NAV at $1.00. At such intervals as they deem appropriate, the
Trustees consider the extent to which NAV calculated by using market
valuations would deviate from $1.00 per share. If the Trustees believe
that a deviation from a fund's amortized cost per share may result in
material dilution or other unfair results to shareholders, the
Trustees have agreed to take such corrective action, if any, as they
deem appropriate to eliminate or reduce, to the extent reasonably
practicable, the dilution or unfair results. Such corrective action
could include selling portfolio instruments prior to maturity to
realize capital gains or losses or to shorten average portfolio
maturity; withholding dividends; redeeming shares in kind;
establishing NAV by using available market quotations; and such other
measures as the Trustees may deem appropriate.   
PERFORMANCE
The funds may quote performance in various ways. Each fund's yield and
total return fluctuate in response to market conditions and other
factors.
YIELD CALCULATIONS. To compute a fund's yield for a period, the net
change in value of a hypothetical account containing one share
reflects the value of additional shares purchased with dividends from
the one original share and dividends declared on both the original
share and any additional shares. The net change is then divided by the
value of the account at the beginning of the period to obtain a base
period return. This base period return is annualized to obtain a
current annualized yield. A fund also may calculate an effective yield
by compounding the base period return over a one-year period. In
addition to the current yield, the funds may quote yields in
advertising based on any historical seven-day period. Yields for the
funds are calculated on the same basis as other money market funds, as
required by applicable regulations.
Yield information may be useful in reviewing a fund's performance and
in providing a basis for comparison with other investment
alternatives. However, each fund's yield fluctuates, unlike
investments that pay a fixed interest rate over a stated period of
time. When comparing investment alternatives, investors should also
note the quality and maturity of the portfolio securities of
respective investment companies they have chosen to consider.
Investors should recognize that in periods of declining interest rates
a fund's yield will tend to be somewhat higher than prevailing market
rates, and in periods of rising interest rates the fund's yield will
tend to be somewhat lower. Also, when interest rates are falling, the
inflow of net new money to a fund from the continuous sale of its
shares will likely be invested in instruments producing lower yields
than the balance of the fund's holdings, thereby reducing the fund's
current yield. In periods of rising interest rates, the opposite can
be expected to occur.
A fund's tax-equivalent yield is the rate an investor would have to
earn from a fully taxable investment before taxes to equal the fund's
tax-free yield. Tax-equivalent yields are calculated by dividing a
fund's yield by the result of one minus a stated federal or combined
federal and state income tax rate. If only a portion of a fund's yield
is tax-exempt, only that portion is adjusted in the calculation.
Municipal Central Cash may invest a portion of its assets in
obligations that are subject to federal income tax. When the fund
invests in these obligations, its tax-equivalent yields will be lower.
TOTAL RETURN CALCULATIONS. Total returns reflect all aspects of a
fund's return, including the effect of reinvesting dividends and
capital gain distributions, and any change in the fund's NAV over a
stated period. Average annual total returns are calculated by
determining the growth or decline in value of a hypothetical
historical investment in a fund over a stated period, and then
calculating the annually compounded percentage rate that would have
produced the same result if the rate of growth or decline in value had
been constant over the period. For example, a cumulative total return
of 100% over ten years would produce an average annual total return of
7.18%, which is the steady annual rate of return that would equal 100%
growth on a compounded basis in ten years. Average annual total
returns covering periods of less than one year are calculated by
determining a fund's total return for the period, extending that
return for a full year (assuming that return remains constant over the
year), and quoting the result as an annual return. While average
annual total returns are a convenient means of comparing investment
alternatives, investors should realize that a fund's performance is
not constant over time, but changes from year to year, and that
average annual total returns represent averaged figures as opposed to
the actual year-to-year performance of the fund.
In addition to average annual total returns, a fund may quote
unaveraged or cumulative total returns reflecting the simple change in
value of an investment over a stated period. Average annual and
cumulative total returns may be quoted as a percentage or as a dollar
amount, and may be calculated for a single investment, a series of
investments, or a series of redemptions, over any time period. Total
returns may be broken down into their components of income and capital
(including capital gains and changes in share price) in order to
illustrate the relationship of these factors and their contributions
to total return. Total returns may be quoted on a before-tax or
after-tax basis. Total returns, yields, and other performance
information may be quoted numerically or in a table, graph, or similar
illustration.
HISTORICAL FUND RESULTS. The following table shows each fund's 7-day
yields and total returns for the period ended May 31, 1997.
The tax-equivalent yield is based on a 36% federal income tax rate.
Note that each fund may invest in securities whose income is subject
to the federal alternative minimum tax.
                                                  Cumulative Total Returns    
 
                           Seven-Day  Tax-        Life of  
                           Yield      Equivalent  Fund*    
                                      Yield                
 
                                                           
 
Taxable Central Cash Fund   5.54%     n/a         3.35%   
 
* From October 21, 1996 (commencement of operations).
                                                   Cumulative Total Returns     
 
                             Seven-Day  Tax-        Life of  
                             Yield      Equivalent  Fund**   
                                        Yield                
 
Municipal Central Cash Fund   3.90%      6.09%       1.25%   
 
** From January 27, 1997 (commencement of operations).
ADDITIONAL PURCHASE AND REDEMPTION INFORMATION
If the Trustees determine that existing conditions make cash payments
undesirable, redemption payments may be made in whole or in part in
securities or other property, valued for this purpose as they are
valued in computing a fund's NAV. Shareholders receiving securities or
other property on redemption may realize a gain or loss for tax
purposes, and will incur any costs of sale, as well as the associated
inconveniences.
DISTRIBUTIONS AND TAXES
DIVIDENDS. Because Taxable Central Cash's income is primarily derived
from interest, dividends from the fund generally will not qualify for
the dividends-received deduction. Short-term capital gains are
distributed as dividend income, but do not qualify for the
dividends-received deduction. A portion of each fund's dividends
derived from certain U.S. Government obligations may be exempt from
state and local taxation. In some cases, distributions will be grossed
up by the amount of disallowed expenses, and these expenses will be
reported separately to shareholders who may or may not be able to use
expenses as an allowable deduction for federal tax purposes.  
To the extent that Municipal Central Cash's income is designated as
federally tax-exempt interest, the daily dividends declared by the
fund are also federally tax-exempt. Short-term capital gains are
distributed as dividend income, but do not qualify for the
dividends-received deduction. These gains will be taxed as ordinary
income. 
Each fund will send each shareholder a notice in January describing
the tax status of dividend and capital gain distributions (if any) for
the prior year.
Shareholders are required to report tax-exempt income on their federal
tax returns. Shareholders who earn other income may be subject to
federal income tax on up to 85% of such benefits to the extent that
their income, including tax-exempt income, exceeds certain base
amounts.
Municipal Central Cash purchases municipal securities whose interest
FMR Texas believes is free from federal income tax.  Generally,
issuers or other parties have entered into covenants requiring
continuing compliance with federal tax requirements to preserve the
tax-free status of interest payments over the life of the security. If
at any time the covenants are not complied with, or if the IRS
otherwise determines that the issuer did not comply with relevant tax
requirements, interest payments from a security could become federally
taxable retroactive to the date a security was issued. For certain
types of structured securities, the tax status of the pass-through of
tax-free income may also be based on the federal tax treatment of the
structure.
As a result of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, interest on certain
"private activity" securities is subject to the federal alternative
minimum tax (AMT), although the interest continues to be excludable
from gross income for other tax purposes. Interest from private
activity securities is a tax preference item for the purposes of
determining whether a taxpayer is subject to the AMT and the amount of
AMT to be paid, if any. Private activity securities issued after
August 7, 1986 to benefit a private or industrial user or to finance a
private facility are affected by this rule.
A portion of the gain on bonds purchased with market discount after
April 30, 1993 and short-term capital gains distributed by Municipal
Central Cash are taxable to shareholders as dividends, not as capital
gains. Municipal Central Cash may distribute any net realized
short-term capital gains and taxable market discount once a year or
more often, as necessary, to maintain its net asset value at $1.00 per
share.
CAPITAL GAIN DISTRIBUTIONS. Each fund may distribute any net realized
short-term capital gains once a year or more often as necessary, to
maintain its net asset value at $1.00 per share. Taxable Central Cash
does not anticipate earning long-term capital gains on securities held
by the fund. Municipal Central Cash does not anticipate distributing
long-term capital gains.
As of the fiscal period ended May 31, 1997, Municipal Central Cash had
a capital loss carryforward of approximately $30,000, which will
expire on May 31, 2005, and is available to offset future capital
gains.
STATE AND LOCAL TAX ISSUES. For mutual funds organized as business
trusts, state law provides for a pass-through of the state and local
income tax exemption afforded to direct owners of U.S. Government
securities. Some states limit this to mutual funds that invest a
certain amount in U.S. Government securities, and some types of
securities, such as repurchase agreements and some agency backed
securities, may not qualify for this benefit. The tax treatment of
your dividend distributions from a fund will be the same as if you
directly owned your proportionate share of the U.S. Government
securities in the fund's portfolio. Because the income earned on most
U.S. Government securities in which a fund invests is exempt from
state and local income taxes, the portion of your dividends from the
fund attributable to these securities will also be free from income
taxes. The exemption from state and local income taxation does not
preclude states from assessing other taxes on the ownership of U.S.
Government securities. In a number of states, corporate franchise
(income) tax laws do not exempt interest earned on U.S. Government
securities whether such securities are held directly or through a
fund.
TAX STATUS OF THE FUNDS. Each fund intends to qualify each year as a
"regulated investment company" for tax purposes so that it will not be
liable for federal tax on income and capital gains, if any,
distributed to shareholders. In order to qualify as a regulated
investment company and avoid being subject to federal income or excise
taxes at the fund level, each fund intends to distribute substantially
all of its net investment income and net realized capital gains within
each calendar year as well as on a fiscal year basis.
Each fund is treated as a separate entity from the other funds of
Fidelity Revere Street Trust for tax purposes.
OTHER TAX INFORMATION. The information above is only a summary of some
of the tax consequences generally affecting each fund and its
shareholders, and no attempt has been made to discuss individual tax
consequences. In addition to federal income taxes, shareholders may be
subject to state and local taxes on fund distributions, and shares may
be subject to state and local personal property taxes. 
FMR TEXAS
FMR Texas is an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of FMR Corp. All of
the stock of FMR Texas is owned by FMR, a wholly owned subsidiary of
FMR Corp., organized in 1972. The voting common stock of FMR Corp. is
divided into two classes. Class B is held predominantly by members of
the Edward C. Johnson 3d family and is entitled to 49% of the vote on
any matter acted upon by the voting common stock. Class A is held
predominantly by non-Johnson family member employees of FMR Corp. and
its affiliates and is entitled to 51% of the vote on any such matter.
The Johnson family group and all other Class B shareholders have
entered into a shareholders' voting agreement under which all Class B
shares will be voted in accordance with the majority vote of Class B
shares. Under the 1940 Act, control of a company is presumed where one
individual or group of individuals owns more than 25% of the voting
stock of that company. Therefore, through their ownership of voting
common stock and the execution of the shareholders' voting agreement,
members of the Johnson family may be deemed, under the 1940 Act, to
form a controlling group with respect to FMR Corp.
At present, the principal operating activities of FMR Corp. are those
conducted by its division, Fidelity Investments Retail Marketing
Company, which provides marketing services to various companies within
the Fidelity organization.
Fidelity investment personnel may invest in securities for their own
account pursuant to a code of ethics that sets forth all employees'
fiduciary responsibilities regarding the funds, establishes procedures
for personal investing and restricts certain transactions. For
example, all personal trades in most securities require pre-clearance,
and participation in initial public offerings is prohibited. In
addition, restrictions on the timing of personal investing in relation
to trades by Fidelity funds and on short-term trading have been
adopted.
TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS
The Trustees and executive officers of the trust are listed below.
Except as indicated, each individual has held the office shown or
other offices in the same company for the last five years. All persons
named as Trustees also serve in similar capacities for other funds
advised by FMR. The business address of each Trustee and officer who
is an "interested person" (as defined in the Investment Company Act of
1940) is 82 Devonshire Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02109, which is
also the address of FMR. The business address of all the other
Trustees is Fidelity Investments, P.O. Box 9235, Boston, Massachusetts
02205-9235. Those Trustees who are "interested persons" by virtue of
their affiliation with either the trust or FMR are indicated by an
asterisk (*).
*EDWARD C. JOHNSON 3d (66), Trustee and President, is Chairman, Chief
Executive Officer and a Director of FMR Corp.; a Director and Chairman
of the Board and of the Executive Committee of FMR; Chairman and a
Director of FMR Texas Inc., Fidelity Management & Research (U.K.)
Inc., and Fidelity Management & Research (Far East) Inc.
*J. GARY BURKHEAD (55), Trustee and Senior Vice President, is Vice
Chairman of FMR Corp.; President of Fidelity Investments Institutional
Services Company (FIIS) Inc.; and President and a Director of FMR
Texas Inc., Fidelity Management & Research (U.K.) Inc., and Fidelity
Management & Research (Far East) Inc.
RALPH F. COX (64), Trustee (1991), is a management consultant  (1994).
Prior to February 1994, he was President of Greenhill Petroleum
Corporation (petroleum exploration and production). Until March 1990,
Mr. Cox was President and Chief Operating Officer of Union Pacific
Resources Company (exploration and production). He is a Director of
Sanifill Corporation (non-hazardous waste, 1993), CH2M Hill Companies
(engineering), Rio Grande, Inc. (oil and gas production), and Daniel
Industries (petroleum measurement equipment manufacturer). In
addition, he is a member of advisory boards of Texas A&M University
and the University of Texas at Austin.
PHYLLIS BURKE DAVIS (65), Trustee (1992). Prior to her retirement in
September 1991, Mrs. Davis was the Senior Vice President of Corporate
Affairs of Avon Products, Inc. She is currently a Director of
BellSouth Corporation (telecommunications), Eaton Corporation
(manufacturing, 1991), and the TJX Companies, Inc. (retail stores),
and previously served as a Director of Hallmark Cards, Inc.
(1985-1991) and Nabisco Brands, Inc. In addition, she is a member of
the President's Advisory Council of The University of Vermont School
of Business Administration.
ROBERT M. GATES (53), Trustee (1997), is a consultant, author, and
lecturer (1993). Mr. Gates was Director of the Central Intelligence
Agency (CIA) from 1991-1993. From 1989 to 1991, Mr. Gates served as
Assistant to the President of the United States and Deputy National
Security Advisor. Mr. Gates is currently a Trustee for the Forum For
International Policy, a Board Member for the Virginia Neurological
Institute, and a Senior Advisor of the Harvard Journal of World
Affairs. In addition, Mr. Gates also serves as a member of the
corporate board for LucasVarity PLC (automotive components and diesel
engines), Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (non-profit), NACCO
Industries, Inc. (mining and manufacturing), and TRW Inc. (original
equipment and replacement products). 
E. BRADLEY JONES (69), Trustee. Prior to his retirement in 1984, Mr.
Jones was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of LTV Steel Company.
He is a Director of TRW Inc. (original equipment and replacement
products), Cleveland-Cliffs Inc (mining), Consolidated Rail
Corporation, Birmingham Steel Corporation, and RPM, Inc. (manufacturer
of chemical products), and he previously served as a Director of NACCO
Industries, Inc. (mining and manufacturing, 1985-1995) and Hyster-Yale
Materials Handling, Inc. (1985-1995). In addition, he serves as a
Trustee of First Union Real Estate Investments, a Trustee and member
of the Executive Committee of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, a
Trustee and member of the Executive Committee of University School
(Cleveland), and a Trustee of Cleveland Clinic Florida.
DONALD J. KIRK (64), Trustee, is Executive-in-Residence (1995) at
Columbia University Graduate School of Business and a financial
consultant. From 1987 to January 1995, Mr. Kirk was a Professor at
Columbia University Graduate School of Business. Prior to 1987, he was
Chairman of the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Mr. Kirk is a
Director of General Re Corporation (reinsurance), and he previously
served as a Director of Valuation Research Corp. (appraisals and
valuations, 1993-1995). In addition, he serves as Chairman of the
Board of Directors of the National Arts Stabilization Fund, Chairman
of the Board of Trustees of the Greenwich Hospital Association, a
Member of the Public Oversight Board of the American Institute of
Certified Public Accountants' SEC Practice Section (1995), and as a
Public Governor of the National Association of Securities Dealers,
Inc. (1996).
*PETER S. LYNCH (54), Trustee, is Vice Chairman and Director of FMR
(1992). Prior to May 31, 1990, he was a Director of FMR and Executive
Vice President of FMR (a position he held until March 31, 1991); Vice
President of Fidelity Magellan Fund and FMR Growth Group Leader; and
Managing Director of FMR Corp. Mr. Lynch was also Vice President of
Fidelity Investments Corporate Services (1991-1992). He is a Director
of W.R. Grace & Co. (chemicals) and Morrison Knudsen Corporation
(engineering and construction). In addition, he serves as a Trustee of
Boston College, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, Historic Deerfield
(1989) and Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities,
and as an Overseer of the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston.
WILLIAM O. McCOY (63), Trustee (1997), is the Vice President of
Finance for the University of North Carolina (16-school system, 1995).
Prior to his retirement in December 1994, Mr. McCoy was Vice Chairman
of the Board of BellSouth Corporation (telecommunications, 1984) and
President of BellSouth Enterprises (1986). He is currently a Director
of Liberty Corporation (holding company, 1984), Weeks Corporation of
Atlanta (real estate, 1994), Carolina Power and Light Company
(electric utility, 1996), and the Kenan Transport Co. (1996).
Previously, he was a Director of First American Corporation (bank
holding company, 1979-1996). In addition, Mr. McCoy serves as a member
of the Board of Visitors for the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill (1994) and for the Kenan-Flager Business School
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1988). 
GERALD C. McDONOUGH (67), Trustee and Chairman of the non-interested
Trustees, is Chairman of G.M. Management Group (strategic advisory
services). Prior to his retirement in July 1988, he was Chairman and
Chief Executive Officer of Leaseway Transportation Corp. (physical
distribution services). Mr. McDonough is a Director of Brush-Wellman
Inc. (metal refining), York International Corp. (air conditioning and
refrigeration), Commercial Intertech Corp. (hydraulic systems,
building systems, and metal products, 1992), CUNO, Inc. (liquid and
gas filtration products, 1996), and Associated Estates Realty
Corporation (a real estate investment trust, 1993). Mr. McDonough
served as a Director of ACME-Cleveland Corp. (metal working,
telecommunications, and electronic products) from 1987-1996.
MARVIN L. MANN (64), Trustee (1993) is Chairman of the Board,
President, and Chief Executive Officer of Lexmark International, Inc.
(office machines, 1991). Prior to 1991, he held the positions of Vice
President of International Business Machines Corporation ("IBM") and
President and General Manager of various IBM divisions and
subsidiaries. Mr. Mann is a Director of M.A. Hanna Company (chemicals,
1993) and Infomart (marketing services, 1991), a Trammell Crow Co. In
addition, he serves as the Campaign Vice Chairman of the Tri-State
United Way (1993) and is a member of the University of Alabama
President's Cabinet.
THOMAS R. WILLIAMS (68), Trustee, is President of The Wales Group,
Inc. (management and financial advisory services). Prior to retiring
in 1987, Mr. Williams served as Chairman of the Board of First
Wachovia Corporation (bank holding company), and Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer of The First National Bank of Atlanta and First
Atlanta Corporation (bank holding company). He is currently a Director
of BellSouth Corporation (telecommunications), ConAgra, Inc.
(agricultural products), Fisher Business Systems, Inc. (computer
software), Georgia Power Company (electric utility), Gerber Alley &
Associates, Inc. (computer software), National Life Insurance Company
of Vermont, American Software, Inc., and AppleSouth, Inc.
(restaurants, 1992).
SARAH H. ZENOBLE  (48), Vice President, is Vice President of
Fidelity's money market  funds (1996) and Vice President of FMR Texas
Inc.
ROBERT LITTERST  (37), is Vice President of Fidelity Taxable Central
Cash Fund (1997) and an employee of FMR Texas. (1991).
ARTHUR S. LORING (48), Secretary, is Senior Vice President (1993) and
General Counsel of FMR, Vice President-Legal of FMR Corp., and Vice
President and Clerk of FDC.
KENNETH A. RATHGEBER (49), Treasurer (1995), is Treasurer of the
Fidelity funds and is an employee of FMR (1995). Before joining FMR,
Mr. Rathgeber was a Vice President of Goldman Sachs & Co. (1978-1995),
where he served in various positions, including Vice President of
Proprietary Accounting (1988-1992), Global Co-Controller (1992-1994),
and Chief Operations Officer of Goldman Sachs (Asia) LLC (1994-1995).
THOMAS D. MAHER (52), Assistant Vice President, is Assistant Vice
President of Fidelity's municipal bond funds (1996) and of Fidelity's
money market funds and Vice President and Associate General Counsel of
FMR Texas Inc. 
JOHN H. COSTELLO (50), Assistant Treasurer, is an employee of FMR.
LEONARD M. RUSH (51), Assistant Treasurer (1994), is an employee of
FMR (1994). Prior to becoming Assistant Treasurer of the Fidelity
funds, Mr. Rush was Chief Compliance Officer of FMR Corp. (1993-1994)
and Chief Financial Officer of Fidelity Brokerage Services, Inc.
(1990-1993).
THOMAS J. SIMPSON (39), Assistant Treasurer, is Assistant Treasurer of
Fidelity's municipal bond funds (1996) and of Fidelity's money market
funds (1996) and an employee of FMR (1996). Prior to joining FMR, Mr.
Simpson was Vice President and Fund Controller of Liberty Investment
Services (1987-1995).
The following table sets forth information describing the compensation
of each Trustee of each fund for his or her services for the fiscal
year ended May 31, 1997.
COMPENSATION TABLE              
 
 
<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
<S>                      <C>                    <C>                    <C>            
Trustees                 Aggregate              Aggregate              Total          
                         Compensation           Compensation           Compensation   
                         from                   from                   from the       
                         Taxable Central        Municipal Central      Fund Complex*  
                         Cash Fund              Cash Fund              A              
                         B                      B                                     
                         +                      +                                     
 
J. Gary Burkhead **      $ 0                    $ 0                    $ 0            
 
Ralph F. Cox             $ 6,500                $ 210                  $ 137,700      
 
Phyllis Burke Davis      $ 6,500                $ 210                  $ 134,700      
 
Richard J. Flynn***      $ 520                  $ 0                    $ 168,000      
 
Robert M. Gates ****     $ 1,800                $ 58                   $ 0            
 
Edward C. Johnson 3d **  $ 0                    $ 0                    $ 0            
 
E. Bradley Jones         $ 6,500                $ 210                  $ 134,700      
 
Donald J. Kirk           $ 6,500                $ 210                  $ 136,200      
 
Peter S. Lynch **        $ 0                    $ 0                    $ 0            
 
William O. McCoy*****    $ 6,500                $ 210                  $ 85,333       
 
Gerald C. McDonough      $ 8,100                $ 265                  $ 136,200      
 
Edward H. Malone***      $ 410                  $ 210                  $ 136,200      
 
Marvin L. Mann           $ 6,500                $ 210                  $ 134,700      
 
Thomas R. Williams       $ 6,500                $ 210                  $ 136,200      
 
</TABLE>
 
* Information is for the calendar year ended December 31, 1996 for 235
funds in the complex.
** Interested Trustees of the fund(s) are compensated by FMR.
*** Richard J. Flynn and Edward H. Malone served on the Board of
Trustees through December 31, 1996.
**** Mr. Gates was appointed to the Board of Trustees of the Fidelity
Revere Street Trust effective March 1, 1997. 
***** During the period from May 1, 1996 through December 31, 1996,
William O. McCoy served as a Member of the Advisory Board of the
trust. Mr. McCoy was appointed to the Board of Trustees of the
Fidelity Revere Street Trust effective January 1, 1997. 
+ Estimated
A Compensation figures include cash, a pro rata portion of benefits
accrued under the retirement program for the period ended December 30,
1996 and required to be deferred, and may include amounts deferred at
the election of Trustees.
B Compensation figures include cash, and may include amounts required
to be deferred, a pro rata portion of benefits accrued under the
retirement program for the period ended December 30, 1996 and required
to be deferred, and amounts deferred at the election of Trustees. 
Under a retirement program adopted in July 1988 and modified in
November 1995 and November 1996, each non-interested Trustee who
retired before December 30, 1996 may receive payments from a Fidelity
fund during his or her lifetime based on his or her basic trustee fees
and length of service. The obligation of a fund to make such payments
is neither secured nor funded. A Trustee became eligible to
participate in the program at the end of the calendar year in which he
or she reached age 72, provided that, at the time of retirement, he or
she had served as a Fidelity fund Trustee for at least five years.
Under a deferred compensation plan adopted in September 1995 and
amended in November 1996 (the Plan), non-interested Trustees must
defer receipt of a portion of, and may elect to defer receipt of an
additional portion of their annual fees. Amounts deferred under the
Plan are treated as though equivalent dollar amounts had been invested
in shares of a cross-section of Fidelity Funds including funds in each
major investment discipline and representing a majority of Fidelity's
assets under management (the Reference Funds). The amounts ultimately
received by the Trustees under the Plan will be directly linked to the
investment performance of the Reference Funds. Deferral of fees in
accordance with the Plan will have a negligible effect on a fund's
assets, liabilities, and net income per share, and will not obligate a
fund to retain the services of any Trustee or to pay any particular
level of compensation to the Trustee. A fund may invest in the
Reference Funds under the Plan without shareholder approval.
 As of December 30, 1996, the non-interested Trustees terminated the
retirement program for Trustees who retire after such date. In
connection with the termination of the retirement program, each
then-existing non-interested Trustee received a credit to his or her
Plan account equal to the present value of the estimated benefits that
would have been payable under the retirement program. The amounts
credited to the non-interested Trustees' Plan accounts are subject to
vesting and are treated as though equivalent dollar amounts had been
invested in shares of the Reference Funds. The amounts ultimately
received by the Trustees in connection with the credits to their Plan
accounts will be directly linked tot he investment performance of the
Reference Funds. The termination of the retirement program and related
crediting of estimated benefits to the Trustees' Plan accounts did not
result in a material cost to the funds.
As of June 30, 1997 all of Taxable Central Cash Fund's total
outstanding shares and all of Municipal Central Cash Fund's total
outstanding shares were held by mutual funds managed by FMR or an FMR
affiliate. FMR Corp. is the ultimate parent company of these
affiliates. By virtue of his ownership interest in FMR Corp., as
described in the "FMR Texas" section on page 23, Mr. Edward C. Johnson
3d, President and Trustee of each fund, may be deemed to be a
beneficial owner of these shares. As of the above date, with the
exception of Mr. Johnson 3d's deemed ownership of Taxable Central Cash
and Municipal Central Cash's shares, the Trustees and officers of the
funds owned, in the aggregate, less than 1% of each fund's total
outstanding shares.
MANAGEMENT CONTRACTS
FMR Texas is manager of Taxable Central Cash and Municipal Central
Cash pursuant to management contracts dated October 18, 1996, which
were approved by FMR, as the then sole shareholder, on October 18,
1996 and January 23, 1997, respectively.
MANAGEMENT SERVICES. Each fund employs FMR Texas to furnish investment
advisory and other services. Under the terms of its management
contract with each fund, FMR Texas acts as investment adviser and,
subject to the supervision of the Board of Trustees, directs the
investments of the fund in accordance with its investment objective,
policies, and limitations. FMR Texas also provides each fund with all
necessary office facilities and personnel for servicing the fund's
investments, compensates all officers of each fund and all Trustees
who are "interested persons" of the trust or of FMR Texas, and all
personnel of each fund or FMR Texas performing services relating to
research, statistical, and investment activities.
In addition, FMR Texas or its affiliates, subject to the supervision
of the Board of Trustees, provide the management and administrative
services necessary for the operation of each fund. These services
include providing facilities for maintaining each fund's organization;
supervising relations with custodians, transfer and pricing agents,
accountants, underwriters, and other persons dealing with each fund;
preparing all general shareholder communications and conducting
shareholder relations; maintaining each fund's records and, if
necessary, the registration of each fund's shares under federal
securities laws and making necessary filings under state securities
laws; developing management and shareholder services for each fund;
and furnishing reports, evaluations, and analyses on a variety of
subjects to the Trustees.
MANAGEMENT-RELATED EXPENSES. Under the terms of each fund's management
contract, each fund pays all of its expenses other than those
specifically payable by FMR Texas. FMR Texas, either itself or through
an affiliate, pays all fees associated with transfer agent and pricing
and bookkeeping services. Expenses payable by each fund include
interest and taxes, brokerage commissions (if any), fees and expenses
of the non-interested Trustees, legal expenses, fees of the custodian
and auditor, costs of registering shares under federal securities laws
and making necessary filings under state securities laws, expenses for
typesetting, printing, and mailing proxy materials to shareholders and
all other expenses of proxy solicitations and shareholder meetings,
each fund's proportionate share of insurance premiums, if any, and
Investment Company Institute dues, and such nonrecurring expenses as
may arise, including costs of any litigation to which a fund may be a
party, and any obligation it may have to indemnify its officers and
Trustees with respect to litigation.
MANAGEMENT FEES. For the services of FMR Texas under each management
contract, FMR, on behalf of each fund, pays FMR Texas a monthly
management fee. For each fund (other than a fund for which FMR Texas
serves as sub-adviser) that invests in Taxable Central Cash or
Municipal Central Cash in a given month, FMR pays FMR Texas a fee
equal to 50% of the monthly management fee rate (including performance
adjustments, if any) that FMR receives from the investing fund,
multiplied by the average net assets invested by that fund in Taxable
Central Cash or Municipal Central Cash for the month. The fee is
reduced to reflect any expenses paid by FMR on behalf of an investing
fund pursuant to an all-inclusive fee management contract, but is not
reduced to reflect any fee waivers or expense reimbursements made by
FMR.
FMR may, from time to time, voluntarily reimburse all or a portion of
a fund's operating expenses (exclusive of interest, taxes, brokerage
commissions, and extraordinary expenses). FMR retains the ability to
be repaid for these expense reimbursements in the amount that expenses
fall below the limit prior to the end of the fiscal year. 
Expense reimbursements by FMR will increase a fund's total returns and
yield, and repayment of the reimbursement by a fund will lower its
total returns and yield.
CONTRACTS WITH FMR AFFILIATES
Each fund has entered into a transfer agent agreement with FIIOC, an
affiliate of FMR Texas. Under the terms of the agreements, FIIOC
performs transfer agency, dividend disbursing, and shareholder
services for each fund.
For providing transfer agency services, FIIOC receives an annual
account fee and an asset-based fee each based on account size and fund
type for each retail account and certain institutional accounts. With
respect to certain institutional retirement accounts, FIIOC receives
an annual account fee and an asset-based fee based on account type or
fund type. These annual account fees are subject to increase based on
postal rate changes.
FIIOC pays out-of-pocket expenses associated with providing transfer
agent services. In addition, FIIOC bears the expense of typesetting,
printing, and mailing prospectuses, statements of additional
information, and all other reports, notices, and statements to
existing shareholders, with the exception of proxy statements.
Each fund has entered into a service agent agreement with FSC, an
affiliate of FMR Texas. Under the terms of the agreements, FSC
calculates the NAV and dividends for each fund and maintains each
fund's portfolio and general accounting records.
For providing pricing and bookkeeping services, FSC receives a monthly
fee based on each fund's average daily net assets throughout the
month.
FMR Texas bears the cost of transfer agency, dividend disbursing, and
shareholder services and pricing and bookkeeping services under the
terms of its management contract with each fund.
DESCRIPTION OF THE TRUST
TRUST ORGANIZATION. Taxable Central Cash Fund and Municipal Central
Cash Fund, are funds of Fidelity Revere Street Trust, an open-end
management investment company organized as a Delaware business trust
on September 11, 1996. Currently, there are two funds of Fidelity
Revere Street Trust. The Trust Instrument permits the Trustees to
create additional funds.
In the event that FMR Texas ceases to be the investment adviser to the
trust or a fund, the right of the trust or fund to use the identifying
name "Fidelity" may be withdrawn. There is a remote possibility that
one fund might become liable for any misstatement in its prospectus or
statement of additional information about another fund.
The assets of the trust received for the issue or sale of shares of
each fund and all income, earnings, profits, and proceeds thereof,
subject only to the rights of creditors, are especially allocated to
such fund, and constitute the underlying assets of such fund. The
underlying assets of each fund are segregated on the books of account,
and are to be charged with the liabilities with respect to such fund
and with a share of the general expenses of the trust. Expenses with
respect to the trust are to be allocated in proportion to the asset
value of the respective funds, except where allocations of direct
expense can otherwise be fairly made. The officers of the trust,
subject to the general supervision of the Board of Trustees, have the
power to determine which expenses are allocable to a given fund, or
which are general or allocable to all of the funds. In the event of
the dissolution or liquidation of the trust, shareholders of each fund
are entitled to receive as a class the underlying assets of such fund
available for distribution.
SHAREHOLDER AND TRUSTEE LIABILITY. The trust is a business trust
organized under Delaware law. Delaware law provides that shareholders
shall be entitled to the same limitations of personal liability
extended to stockholders of private corporations for profit. The
courts of some states, however, may decline to apply Delaware law on
this point. The Trust Instrument contains an express disclaimer of
shareholder liability for the debts, liabilities, obligations, and
expenses of the trust and requires that a disclaimer be given in each
contract entered into or executed by the trust or the Trustees. The
Trust Instrument provides for indemnification out of each fund's
property of any shareholder or former shareholder held personally
liable for the obligations of the fund. The Trust Instrument also
provides that each fund shall, upon request, assume the defense of any
claim made against any shareholder for any act or obligation of the
fund and satisfy any judgment thereon. Thus, the risk of a shareholder
incurring financial loss on account of shareholder liability is
limited to circumstances in which Delaware law does not apply, no
contractual limitation of liability was in effect, and the fund is
unable to meet its obligations. FMR Texas believes that, in view of
the above, the risk of personal liability to shareholders is extremely
remote.
The Trust Instrument further provides that the Trustees, if they have
exercised reasonable care, shall not be personally liable to any
person other than the trust or its shareholders; moreover, the
Trustees shall not be liable for any conduct whatsoever, provided that
Trustees are not protected against any liability to which they would
otherwise be subject by reason of willful misfeasance, bad faith,
gross negligence, or reckless disregard of the duties involved in the
conduct of their office. 
VOTING RIGHTS. Each fund's capital consists of shares of beneficial
interest. As a shareholder, you receive one vote for each dollar value
of net asset value you own. The shares have no preemptive or
conversion rights; the voting and dividend rights, the right of
redemption, and the privilege of exchange are described in the
Prospectus. Shares are fully paid and nonassessable, except as set
forth under the heading "Shareholder and Trustee Liability" above.
Shareholders representing 10% or more of the trust or a fund may, as
set forth in the Trust Instrument, call meetings of the trust or fund
for any purpose related to the trust or fund, as the case may be,
including, in the case of a meeting of the entire trust, the purpose
of voting on removal of one or more Trustees. 
The trust or any fund may be terminated upon the sale of its assets
to, or merger with, another open-end management investment company or
series thereof, or upon liquidation and distribution of its assets.
Generally such terminations must be approved by vote of the holders of
a majority of the trust or the fund, as determined by the current
value of each shareholder's investment in the fund or trust; however,
the Trustees may, without prior shareholder approval, change the form
of organization of the trust by merger, consolidation, or
incorporation. If not so terminated or reorganized, the trust and its
funds will continue indefinitely. 
Under the Trust Instrument, the Trustees may, without shareholder
vote, cause the trust to merge or consolidate into one or more trusts,
partnerships, or corporations, or cause the trust to be incorporated
under Delaware law, so long as the surviving entity is an open-end
management investment company that will succeed to or assume the trust
registration statement.
CUSTODIAN. The Chase Manhattan Bank, 1 Chase Manhattan Plaza, New
York,  New York is custodian of the assets of Taxable Central Cash.
UMB Bank, n.a., 1010 Grand Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri, is custodian
of the assets of Municipal Central Cash. Each custodian is responsible
for the safekeeping of a fund's assets and the appointment of any
subcustodian banks and clearing agencies. A custodian takes no part in
determining the investment policies of a fund or in deciding which
securities are purchased or sold by a fund. However, a fund may invest
in obligations of its custodian and may purchase securities from or
sell securities to its custodian. The Bank of New York, headquartered
in New York, also may serve as a special purpose custodian of certain
assets of the Taxable Central Cash in connection with repurchase
agreement transactions. 
FMR Texas, its officers and directors, its affiliated companies, and
the Board of Trustees may, from time to time, conduct transactions
with various banks, including banks serving as custodians for certain
funds advised by FMR. Transactions that have occurred to date include
mortgages and personal and general business loans. In the judgment of
FMR Texas, the terms and conditions of those transactions were not
influenced by existing or potential custodial or other fund
relationships.
AUDITOR. Price Waterhouse LLP, 2001 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas serves
as the trust's independent accountant. The auditor examines financial
statements for the funds and provides other audit, tax, and related
services.
 
 
APPENDIX
The descriptions that follow are examples of eligible ratings for the
funds. A fund may, however, consider the ratings for other types of
investments and the ratings assigned by other rating organizations
when determining the eligibility of a particular investment.
DESCRIPTION OF MOODY'S INVESTORS SERVICE RATINGS OF MUNICIPAL
OBLIGATIONS
Moody's ratings for short-term municipal obligations will be
designated Moody's Investment Grade ("MIG"). A two-component rating is
assigned to variable rate demand obligations. The first component
represents an evaluation of the degree of risk associated with
scheduled principal repayment and interest payments and is designated
by a long-term rating, e.g., "Aaa" or "A." The second component
represents an evaluation of the degree of risk associated with the
demand feature and is designated "VMIG."
MIG 1/VMIG 1 - This designation denotes best quality. There is present
strong protection by established cash flows, superior liquidity
support, or demonstrated broad-based access to the market for
refinancing.
MIG 2/VMIG 2 - This designation denotes high quality. Margins of
protection are ample although not so large as in the preceding group.
DESCRIPTION OF STANDARD & POOR'S RATINGS OF MUNICIPAL NOTES
Municipal notes maturing in three years or less will likely receive a
"note" rating symbol. Notes that have a put option or demand feature
are assigned a dual rating. The first rating addresses the likelihood
of repayment of principal and payment of interest due and for
short-term obligations is designated by a note rating symbol.  The
second rating addresses only the demand feature, and is designated by
a commercial paper rating symbol, e.g., "A-1" or "A-2."
SP-1 - Strong capacity to pay principal and interest. Issues
determined to possess very strong characteristics are given a plus (+)
designation.
SP-2 - Satisfactory capacity to pay principal and interest, with some
vulnerability to adverse financial and economic changes over the term
of the notes.
DESCRIPTION OF MOODY'S INVESTORS SERVICE RATINGS OF COMMERCIAL PAPER
Moody's assigns short-term debt ratings to obligations which have an
original maturity not exceeding one year.
Issuers rated PRIME-1 (or related supporting institutions) have a
superior ability for repayment of principal and payment of interest. 
Issuers rated PRIME-2 (or related supporting institutions) have a
strong ability for repayment of principal and payment of interest.
DESCRIPTION OF STANDARD & POOR'S RATINGS OF COMMERCIAL PAPER
Debt issues considered short-term in the relevant market may be
assigned a Standard & Poor's commercial paper rating.
A-1 - This highest category indicates that the degree of safety
regarding timely payment is strong. Those issues determined to possess
extremely strong safety characteristics are denoted with a plus sign
(+) designation.
A-2 - Capacity for timely payment on issues with this designation is
satisfactory. However, the relative degree of safety is not as high as
for issues designated A-1.
PART C - OTHER INFORMATION
 
Item 24.  Financial Statements and Exhibits
 (a) Not Applicable.
 (b) Exhibits:
 1. (a)  Trust Instrument dated September 11, 1996 is incorporated
herein by reference to Exhibit 1(a) of the initial registration
statement.
     (b) Certificate of Trust of Fidelity Revere Street Trust, dated
September 11, 1996 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 1(b)
of the initial registration statement.
 2. (a) By-Laws of the Trust, effective September 11, 1996, are
incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 2(a) of the initial
registration statement. 
 3.  Not applicable.
 4.  Not applicable.
 5. (a) Management Contract dated October 18, 1996 between Fidelity
Revere Street Trust, on behalf of Taxable Central Cash Fund, and FMR
Texas Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 5(a) of
Post-Effective Amendment No. 1. 
     (b) Management Contract dated October 18, 1996 between Fidelity
Revere Street Trust, on behalf of Municipal 
Central Cash Fund, and FMR Texas Inc. is incorporated herein by
reference to Exhibit 5(b) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 1. 
 6.   Not applicable.
 7. (a) Retirement Plan for Non-Interested Person Trustees, Directors
or General Partners, as amended on November 16, 1995, is incorporated
herein by reference to Exhibit 7(a) to Fidelity Select Portfolio's
(File No. 2-69972) Post-Effective Amendment No. 54.
     (b) The Fee Deferral Plan for Non-Interested Person Directors and
Trustees of the Fidelity Funds, effective as of September 14, 1995 and
amended through November 14, 1996, is incorporated herein by reference
to Exhibit 7(b) of Fidelity Aberdeen Street Trust's (File No.
33-43529)  Post-Effective Amendment No. 19.
 8  (a)  Custodian Agreement and Appendix C, dated August 1, 1994,
between The Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A. and Fidelity Revere Street
Trust on behalf of Taxable Central Cash Fund is incorporated herein by
reference to Exhibit 8(a) of Fidelity Investment Trust's
Post-Effective Amendment No. 59 (File No. 2-90649).
     (b)  Appendix A, dated October 17, 1996, to the Custodian
Agreement, dated August 1, 1994, between The Chase Manhattan Bank,
N.A. and Fidelity Revere Street Trust on behalf of Taxable Central
Cash Fund is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 8(c) of
Fidelity Charles Street Trust's Post-Effective Amendment No. 57 (File
No. 2-73133).
     (c)  Appendix B, dated September 18, 1997, to the Custodian
Agreement, dated August 1, 1994, between The Chase Manhattan Bank,
N.A. and Fidelity Revere Street Trust on behalf of Taxable Central
Cash Fund is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 8(b) of
Fidelity Charles Street Trust's Post-Effective Amendment No. 62 (File
No. 2-73133).
     (d)  Custodian Agreement, Appendix B, and Appendix C, dated
December 1, 1994, between UMB Bank, n.a. and Fidelity Revere Street
Trust on behalf of Municipal Central Cash Fund is incorporated herein
by reference to Exhibit 8 of Fidelity California Municipal Trust's
Post-Effective Amendment No. 28 (File No. 2-83367).
     (e)  Appendix A, dated September 18, 1997, to the Custodian
Agreement, dated December 1, 1994, between UMB Bank, n.a. and Fidelity
Revere Street Trust on behalf of Municipal Central Cash Fund is
incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 8(b) of Fidelity Municipal
Trust II's Post-Effective Amendment No. 17 (File No. 33-43986).
     (f)  Schedule 1 to the Fidelity Group Repo Custodian Agreement
dated September 16, 1996 among The Bank of New York, J. P. Morgan
Securities, Inc. and the Fidelity Funds is incorporated herein by
reference to Exhibit 8(g) of the initial registration statement.
    (g) Fidelity Group Repo Custodian Agreement among Chemical Bank,
Greenwich Capital Markets, Inc., and the Fidelity Funds, as currently
in effect, was electronically filed and is incorporated herein by
reference to Exhibit 8(f) of Fidelity Institutional Cash Portfolios'
(File No. 2-74808) Post-Effective Amendment No. 31.
    (h) Schedule 1 to the Fidelity Group Repo Custodian Agreement
dated September 16, 1996 among Chemical Bank, Greenwich Capital
Markets, Inc., and the Fidelity Funds is incorporated herein by
reference to Exhibit 8(i) of the initial registration statement.
   (i) Joint Trading Account Custody Agreement between the The Bank of
New York and the Fidelity Funds, as currently in effect, was
electronically filed and is incorporated herein by reference to
Exhibit 8(h) of Fidelity Institutional Cash Portfolios' (File No.
2-74808) Post-Effective Amendment No. 31.
   (j) First Amendment to Joint Trading Account Custody Agreement
between the The Bank of New York and the Fidelity Funds, as currently
in effect, was electronically filed and is incorporated herein by
reference to Exhibit 8(i) of Fidelity Institutional Cash Portfolios'
(File No. 2-74808) Post-Effective Amendment No. 31.
 9. None.
 10. Not applicable.
 11. Not applicable.
 12. Not applicable.
 13. None.
 14. Not applicable.
 15. Not applicable. 
 16. Not applicable.  
 17. Not applicable. 
 18. Not applicable.
Item 25.  Persons Controlled by or under Common Control with
Registrant
 The Board of Trustees of Registrant is the same as the boards of
other funds advised by FMR, each of which has Fidelity Management &
Research Company as its investment adviser. In addition, the officers
of these funds are substantially identical.  Nonetheless, Registrant
takes the position that it is not under common control with these
other funds since the power residing in the respective boards and
officers arises as the result of an official position with the
respective funds.
Item 26.  Number of Holders of Securities
As of May 31, 1998
Title of Class: Shares of Beneficial Interest
 
Name of Series                    Number of Record Holders
Taxable Central Cash              119
Municipal Central Cash            11
Item 27.  Indemnification
 Pursuant to Del. Code Ann. title 12 (sub-section) 3817, a Delaware
business trust may provide in its governing instrument for the
indemnification of its officers and trustees from and against any and
all claims and demands whatsoever. Article X, Section 10.02 of the
Trust Instrument states that the Registrant shall indemnify any
present trustee or officer to the fullest extent permitted by law
against liability, and all expenses reasonably incurred by him or her
in connection with any claim, action, suit or proceeding in which he
or she is involved by virtue of his or her service as a trustee,
officer, or both, and against any amount incurred in settlement
thereof. Indemnification will not be provided to a person adjudged by
a court or other adjudicatory body to be liable to the Registrant or
its shareholders by reason of willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross
negligence or reckless disregard of his or her duties (collectively,
"disabling conduct"), or not to have acted in good faith in the
reasonable belief that his or her action was in the best interest of
the Registrant. In the event of a settlement, no indemnification may
be provided unless there has been a determination, as specified in the
Trust Instrument, that the officer or trustee did not engage in
disabling conduct.
 
 
 Pursuant to the agreement by which Fidelity Investments Institutional
Operations Company ("FIIOC") is appointed transfer agent, the
Registrant agrees to indemnify and hold FIIOC harmless against any
losses, claims, damages, liabilities or expenses (including reasonable
counsel fees and expenses) resulting from: 
 
(1) any claim, demand, action or suit brought by any person other than
the Registrant, including by a shareholder, which names FIIOC and/or
the Registrant as a party and is not based on and does not result from
FIIOC's willful misfeasance, bad faith or negligence or reckless
disregard of duties, and arises out of or in connection with FIIOC's
performance under the Transfer Agency Agreement; or 
 
(2) any claim, demand, action or suit (except to the extent
contributed to by FIIOC's willful misfeasance, bad faith or negligence
or reckless disregard of duties) which results from the negligence of
the Registrant, or from FIIOC's acting upon any instruction(s)
reasonably believed by it to have been executed or communicated by any
person duly authorized by the Registrant, or as a result of FIIOC's
acting in reliance upon advice reasonably believed by FIIOC to have
been given by counsel for the Registrant, or as a result of FIIOC's
acting in reliance upon any instrument or stock certificate reasonably
believed by it to have been genuine and signed, countersigned or
executed by the proper person.
Item 28. Business and Other Connections of Investment Adviser
 
FMR TEXAS INC. (FMR Texas)
 FMR Texas provides investment advisory services to Fidelity
Management & Research Company.  The directors and officers of the
Adviser have held the following positions of a substantial nature
during the past two fiscal years.
Edward C. Johnson 3d  Chairman of the Board and Director of FMR          
                      Texas, FMR, FMR Corp., FMR (Far East) Inc.,        
                      and FMR (U.K.) Inc.; Chairman of the Board of      
                      FMR; President and Chief Executive Officer of      
                      FMR Corp.; Chairman of the Board and               
                      Representative Director of Fidelity Investments    
                      Japan Limited; President and Trustee of funds      
                      advised by FMR.                                    
 
                                                                         
 
J. Gary Burkhead      President of FIIS; President and Director of FMR   
                      Texas, FMR, FMR (Far East) Inc., and FMR           
                      (U.K.) Inc.; Managing Director of FMR Corp.;       
                      Senior Vice President and Trustee of funds         
                      advised by FMR.                                    
 
                                                                         
 
Robert C. Pozen       President and Director of FMR; President and       
                      Director of FMR Texas Inc., FMR (U.K.) Inc.,       
                      and FMR (Far East) Inc.; General Counsel,          
                      Managing Director, and Senior Vice President of    
                      FMR Corp.                                          
 
                                                                         
 
Robert H. Auld        Vice President of FMR Texas.                       
 
                                                                         
 
Robert K. Duby        Vice President of FMR Texas and of funds           
                      advised by FMR.                                    
 
                                                                         
 
Robert Litterst       Vice President of FMR Texas and of funds           
                      advised by FMR.                                    
 
                                                                         
 
Thomas D. Maher       Vice President of FMR Texas and Assistant Vice     
                      President of Money Market funds advised by         
                      FMR.                                               
 
                                                                         
 
Scott A. Orr          Vice President of FMR Texas and of funds           
                      advised by FMR.                                    
 
                                                                         
 
Burnell R. Stehman    Vice President of FMR Texas and of funds           
                      advised by FMR.                                    
 
                                                                         
 
John J. Todd          Vice President of FMR Texas and of funds           
                      advised by FMR.                                    
 
                                                                         
 
Sarah Zenoble         Vice President of FMR Texas and of Money           
                      Market funds advised by FMR.                       
 
                                                                         
 
Mark G. Lohr          Treasurer of FMR Texas, FMR (U.K.) Inc., FMR       
                      (Far East) Inc., and FMR; Vice President of        
                      FMR.                                               
 
                                                                         
 
Stephen G. Manning    Assistant Treasurer of FMR Texas, FMR (U.K.)       
                      Inc., FMR (Far East) Inc., and FMR; Vice           
                      President and Treasurer of FMR Corp.               
 
                                                                         
 
Jay Freedman          Secretary of FMR Texas; Clerk of FMR (U.K.)        
                      Inc., FMR (Far East) Inc., and FMR Corp.;          
                      Assistant Clerk of FMR.                            
 
Item 29. Principal Underwriters
 
 (a) Not applicable.
 
 (b) Not applicable.
 
 (c) Not applicable.
 
Item 30. Location of Accounts and Records
 All accounts, books, and other documents required to be maintained by
Section 31a of the 1940 Act and the Rules promulgated thereunder are
maintained by Fidelity Management & Research Company or Fidelity
Service Co., 82 Devonshire Street, Boston, MA 02109, or the funds'
respective custodian:  Chase Manhattan Bank, 1 Chase Manhattan Plaza,
New York, N.Y.; or UMB Bank, n.a., 1010 Grand Avenue, Kansas City, MO.
Item 31.  Management Services
  Not applicable.
Item 32.  Undertakings
  Not applicable.
 
 
SIGNATURE
 
 
 Pursuant to the requirements of the Investment Company Act of 1940
the Registrant has duly caused this Registration Statement to be
signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereto duly authorized, in
the City of Boston, and Commonwealth of Massachusetts on the  2nd day
of June, 1998.
 
 
 
 
 
 
          Fidelity Revere Street Trust
 
 
    By: /s/Eric D. Roiter            Eric D. Roiter, Secretary



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