COURT OF APPEAL OF  
NEW BRUNSWICK  
COUR D’APPEL DU  
NOUVEAU-BRUNSWICK  
31-21-CA  
666917 N.B. INC. and T.C.I. MANUFACTURING  
INC.  
666917 N.B. INC. et T.C.I. MANUFACTURING  
INC.  
APPELLANTS  
APPELANTES  
- and -  
- et -  
STAIRS BUILDING (2004) LTD.  
RESPONDENT  
STAIRS BUILDING (2004) LTD.  
INTIMÉE  
666917 N.B. Inc. et al. v. Stairs Building (2004)  
Ltd., 2022 NBCA 22  
666917 N.B. Inc. et autre c. Stairs Building (2004)  
Ltd., 2022 NBCA 22  
CORAM:  
CORAM :  
The Honourable Justice Quigg  
The Honourable Justice French  
The Honourable Justice LeBlond  
l’honorable juge Quigg  
l’honorable juge French  
l’honorable juge LeBlond  
Appeal from a decision of the Court of Queen’s  
Appel d’une décision de la Cour du Banc de la  
Bench:  
Reine :  
March 12, 2021  
le 12 mars 2021  
History of Case:  
Historique de la cause :  
Decision under appeal:  
2021 NBQB 58  
Décision frappée d’appel :  
2021 NBBR 58  
Preliminary or incidental proceedings:  
2020 NBQB 141  
Procédures préliminaires ou accessoires :  
2020 NBBR 141  
Appeal heard:  
Appel entendu :  
January 18, 2022  
le 18 janvier 2022  
Judgment rendered:  
June 2, 2022  
Jugement rendu :  
le 2 juin 2022  
Reasons for judgment:  
Motifs de jugement :  
The Honourable Justice Quigg  
l’honorable juge Quigg  
Concurred in by:  
The Honourable Justice French  
The Honourable Justice LeBlond  
Souscrivent aux motifs :  
l’honorable juge French  
l’honorable juge LeBlond  
- 2 -  
Counsel at hearing:  
Avocats à l’audience :  
For the appellants:  
Pour les appelantes :  
Matthew T. Hayes, Q.C.  
Matthew T. Hayes, c.r.  
For the respondent:  
Pour l’intimée :  
Andrew D. Rouse, Q.C.  
Andrew D. Rouse, c.r.  
THE COURT  
LA COUR  
The appeal is dismissed with costs of $3,000.  
L’appel est rejeté avec dépens de 3 000 $.  
The judgment of the Court was delivered by  
QUIGG, J.A.  
I.  
Introduction  
[1]  
[2]  
[3]  
This appeal concerns the interpretation of a contract relating to the  
preparation of groundwork for an expansion to an existing building owned by the  
appellants, 666917 N.B. Inc. and T.C.I. Manufacturing Inc.  
The primary issue is whether the contract was a fixed-price contract in the  
amount of $90,000 as the appellants alleged, or whether the cost to remove and replace  
unstable ground amounted to an “extra” under the contract.  
The trial judge determined the evidence did not support the appellants’  
allegations and Stairs Building (2004) Ltd., the respondent, had proved its damages at trial.  
I agree. I would dismiss the appeal for the reasons that follow.  
II.  
Background  
[4]  
Stairs has been involved in the construction industry for approximately 40  
years. It primarily excavates and prepares groundwork for the foundation of buildings.  
Randy Stairs is the principal of the corporation. The appellant 666917 owns land and  
premises located at 55 Blizzard Street, in Fredericton. TCI manufacturing is related to  
666917 and operates its business at that location. The directors of both corporations are  
Louis Bertrand and his brother, Paul Bertrand.  
[5]  
In 1994, the appellants built a structure on the property. In 2012, they  
wished to construct an addition to the original building and contacted Stairs to provide a  
quote to prepare the groundwork for the addition. The appellants retained the engineering  
firm of Gemtec to provide a geotechnical report respecting the suitability of the soil for the  
- 2 -  
building’s foundation. Stairs received a copy of the geotechnical report before providing a  
written quote dated October 12, 2012.  
[6]  
The appellants requested minor changes to the 2012 job, and Stairs was  
required to perform extra work as a result. No written amendments were made to the 2012  
quote, and Stairs invoiced the appellants for the extra work and was paid. Although the  
increased size of the addition and the price changed, all parties continued to work from the  
2012 quote. The 2012 geotechnical report confirmed there was unstable ground on the  
property, which had to be removed by Stairs and replaced with aggregate before the  
addition could be constructed on the foundation. As a result of the work carried out in 2012-  
2013, Stairs was aware the property contained unstable ground.  
[7]  
[8]  
[9]  
In early 2017, the appellants again contacted Stairs to obtain a quote to  
prepare the ground for a further addition to the building. Stairs provided a written quote  
dated November 10, 2017, for $114,626. This quote was provided without a new  
geotechnical report having been prepared. As a result, the 2017 quote contained a provision  
excluding the excavation of unstable ground as Stairs was aware there could be issues,  
based on its experience working on the property in 2012-2013.  
After November 2017, the appellants reduced the size of the addition and  
requested other minor changes in the scope of work. This resulted in a decrease of the 2017  
quote from $114,626 to $90,000. The nature of the work to be undertaken by Stairs  
remained the same. The 2017 quote, which excluded the excavation of unstable ground,  
formed part of the contract between the parties. As in the case of the 2012 job, the  
amendment to the price was a verbal agreement, not reduced to writing by the parties.  
In August 2018, Stairs commenced its work without a geotechnical report  
respecting the soil where the foundation was to be built. Louis Bertrand acted as the project  
manager for the construction on behalf of the appellants.  
- 3 -  
[10]  
At Stairs’ insistence, the appellants once again retained Gemtec to prepare  
a geotechnical report, which was completed on September 19, 2018. The report was  
prepared by Mr. Kalaba, an engineer, who testified he had reviewed it with both Louis  
Bertrand and Randy Stairs at the property. It confirmed the area where the addition was to  
be built contained significant unstable ground, which had to be removed and replaced with  
approved aggregate. Randy Stairs testified that immediately after Mr. Kalaba reviewed the  
report with Louis Bertrand and himself, he advised Louis Bertrand he would charge $12.50  
per ton to excavate the unstable ground and replace it with approved aggregate. Randy  
Stairs testified Louis Bertrand gave him a “nod” to go ahead and to follow Mr. Kalaba’s  
directions. Louis Bertrand denies this. Mr. Kalaba also testified that Randy Stairs and Louis  
Bertrand had a discussion immediately after he reviewed the report with them, but he was  
not privy to what was discussed. Louis Bertrand testified at discovery that he did not speak  
to Mr. Kalaba or anyone else about the Gemtec report.  
[11]  
[12]  
The underlying action was a claim for a mechanics’ lien by Stairs, against  
property owned by the appellants. The appellants take the position the contract was a fixed-  
price job for $90,000 and there was no agreement to pay Stairs an extra $12.50 per ton to  
remove and replace the unstable ground.  
There is no dispute that Louis Bertrand was on the site every day, and he  
observed all the extra work being performed by Stairs Building to excavate and replace the  
unstable ground. There is also no dispute all of the extra work was required in order to  
complete the job. Stairs purchased 7825 tons of additional aggregate from a gravel pit  
owned by Matt Harris and Son Limited to replace the unstable ground. Invoices for these  
purchases and the delivery slips were entered as exhibits at trial. The delivery slips  
evidenced the number of the invoices which were sent to Stairs. A small number of the  
delivery slips were missing; however, most of the claim could be traced by way of the slips  
and records provided by Mr. Harris.  
[13]  
While in the Statement of Defence the appellants asserted the contract was  
for the fixed price of $90,000, they did not put forward, as an alternative defence, the  
- 4 -  
amount claimed as an extra by Stairs was excessive or inaccurate. In substance, the  
Statement of Defence centred on the allegation the contract was a fixed-price contract for  
$90,000.  
A.  
Pre-trial motions  
[14]  
The trial was scheduled for July 6, 7, and 8, 2020. On June 25, 2020, the  
appellants filed a motion seeking an adjournment because their primary witness, Louis  
Bertrand, was under medical and psychological treatment and had been advised by his  
treating professional not to attend trial. The basis of this motion was that the key issues  
were the terms of the oral contract between Randy Stairs and Louis Bertrand and, in the  
event that Stairs prevailed, Stairs would be awarded damages. According to the appellants,  
understanding the terms of the agreement had to be based on the evidence of these two  
witnesses. They were the parties who negotiated the terms of the predominantly oral  
contract, and both had testified at discovery.  
[15]  
In the months leading up to trial, Louis Bertrand sought treatment for mental  
health-related issues. According to the appellants, his treatment provider advised Paul  
Bertrand that Louis Bertrand should not participate in a trial until at least early 2021. When  
the first motion was heard, on June 30, 2020, and the second, on July 6, 2020, the appellants  
sought adjournments of the trial. The basis of the request for the adjournments was Louis  
Bertrand’s unavailability due to his mental health concerns.  
[16]  
On June 30, 2020, the first motion was heard. The motion judge declined  
the adjournment holding the appellants had not filed sufficient evidence to substantiate the  
necessity to postpone the trial to 2021. At the second motion, further evidence from Louis  
Bertrand’s treatment provider was filed, explaining Louis Bertrand’s unavailability for the  
trial. After the second motion, the judge found there still was not enough evidence to  
warrant postponing the trial to 2021 but granted a seven-week adjournment to allow  
counsel for the appellants to review documents recently disclosed by Stairs and directed  
- 5 -  
the trial proceed on August 25, 26 and 27, 2020. Costs were awarded against the appellants  
on each motion. The appellants did not seek leave to appeal either motion decision.  
[17]  
A different trial judge commenced the trial on August 25, 2020, and Louis  
Bertrand did not participate. With the consent of the parties, Louis Bertrand’s discovery  
evidence was entered as evidence pursuant to Rule 32.11 (7)(b).  
B.  
The appellants’ position  
[18]  
According to the appellants, Louis Bertrand’s absence deprived the court of  
essentially half of the necessary evidence regarding the terms of the oral agreement  
between the appellants and Stairs; prevented counsel for the appellants from examining  
Louis Bertrand directly or in response to cross-examination; and hindered counsel’s ability  
to cross-examine Randy Stairs on the evidence he had provided at trial. The trial judge  
heard evidence from Paul Bertrand that his brother, Louis, was responsible for overseeing  
all work on the building and the expansion plans and had the substantive dealings with  
Stairs.  
[19]  
The appellants submit the effect of Louis Bertrand’s absence on the  
outcome of the trial is apparent throughout the trial judge’s decision. They say although  
Louis Bertrand’s discovery evidence is diametrically opposed to the judge’s findings on  
several points, the decision hardly refers to Louis Bertrand’s evidence at all. The appellants  
contend the trial judge found that, while the appellants argued Stairs failed to notify them  
of the increased price caused by unstable ground, “there was nothing of substance in the  
evidence that would support that point” (para. 10). The appellants submit the trial judge  
did not give any weight or consideration to Louis Bertrand’s discovery testimony that he  
knew nothing about a price increase until after Stairs issued invoices totalling $90,000.  
[20]  
The appellants argue the trial judge placed great emphasis on conversations  
between Randy Stairs and Louis Bertrand where Louis Bertrand purportedly gave non-  
verbal consent to prices and charges or told him to “just keep going” (para. 18),  
- 6 -  
conversations that Louis Bertrand disputed in his discovery evidence. The appellants say  
the trial judge faulted the appellants for not retaining a forensic accountant to review Stairs’  
invoicing. They submit that by doing this, the trial judge effectively reversed the onus of  
proving damages, requiring the appellants to disprove Stairs’ claims.  
[21]  
According to the appellants, the trial judge concluded the 2018 verbal  
agreement between the appellants and Stairs was in essence, a “verbal modification” of the  
2017 quote provided by Stairs. Therefore, the appellants allege he implied a term into the  
2018 verbal contract – a written term for a quote provided a year earlier about a different  
project.  
[22]  
Furthermore, the appellants contend the trial judge erred in dismissing  
doubts about the amount of aggregate delivered. The trial judge found that because the  
appellants believed it was a fixed-price contract, they could not question the amount on the  
invoice, or challenge the damages claimed.  
C.  
The respondent’s position  
[23]  
With respect to the appellants’ contentions regarding the motion judge’s  
refusal to grant the adjournments, the respondents submit the evidence before the motion  
judge respecting Louis Bertrand’s attendance did not warrant an adjournment. In the  
appellants’ submission, they allege the motion judge granted a four-week adjournment. In  
fact, it was an adjournment of approximately seven weeks – from July 6, 2021, to August  
25, 2021.  
[24]  
Stairs also submits, if the appellants were unsatisfied with the motion  
judge’s decisions regarding the adjournment motions, they should have filed a motion for  
leave to appeal those interlocutory decisions. Moreover, the appellants did not request a  
further adjournment prior to or at the commencement of the trial.  
- 7 -  
[25]  
With respect to the appellants’ contention the trial judge implied a term into  
the 2018 contract, the respondents state there was no need to imply the term as it was  
already included in the 2017 contract and thus included in the 2018 verbal agreement.  
III.  
Grounds of Appeal  
[26]  
The appellants’ grounds for this appeal are as follows:  
i.  
The motion judge erred in refusing to adjourn the trial, despite the  
unavailability of a witness. This resulted in a fundamentally unfair trial;  
ii.  
The trial judge erred in failing to properly consider the discovery evidence of  
Louis Bertrand and his uncontroverted statements with respect to the contract.  
Therefore, the judge did not have all the evidence;  
iii.  
iv.  
The trial judge incorrectly implied a contractual term into a verbal agreement  
between the parties based on a misapprehension of the evidence;  
The trial judge failed to properly consider the evidence respecting damages  
and applied an incorrect legal standard to Stairs’ claim and the appellants’  
counterclaim. This created a reverse onus on the appellants to disprove  
damages; and  
v.  
The trial judge erred in interpreting the contract.  
V.  
Standard of Review  
[27]  
The appellants raise five grounds, claiming all three standards of review are  
in play: the discretionary standard, the standard of correctness, and the standard of palpable  
and overriding error.  
- 8 -  
[28]  
The discretionary standard reflects the high standard of deference accorded  
to discretionary decisions. On appeal, the Court may only interfere with a discretionary  
judicial decision if it is founded on an error of law, an error in the application of the  
governing principles, or a palpable and overriding error in the assessment of the evidence:  
Maisonneuve, Hamelin, Martin Ltd. v. JWT Campground Inc., [2021] N.B.J. No. 205 (QL)  
(C.A.), at para. 45.  
[29]  
[30]  
With respect to the remaining standards, questions of law are reviewable on  
the standard of correctness, while questions of fact are reviewable on the standard of  
palpable and overriding error: Vautour et al. v. Her Majesty the Queen in right of the  
Province of New Brunswick et al., 2021 NBCA 4, [2021] N.B.J. No. 18 (QL), at para. 31;  
Housen v. Nikolaisen, 2002 SCC 33, [2002] 2 S.C.R. 235.  
Questions of mixed fact and law are reviewable on the standard of palpable  
and overriding error, unless a question of law is extricable from the mix, in which case the  
standard of review is correctness. Instances where a question of law is extricable include  
“the application of an incorrect principle, the failure to consider a required element of a  
legal test, or the failure to consider a relevant factor” (see Sattva Capital Corp. v. Creston  
Moly Corp., 2014 SCC 53, [2014] 2 S.C.R. 633, at para. 53; Algo Enterprises Ltd. v. Repap  
New Brunswick Inc., 2016 NBCA 35, 450 N.B.R. (2d) 238, at para. 18; Vautour, at para.  
31).  
[31]  
The appellants submit the standards of review with respect to each ground  
of appeal are:  
a.  
b.  
c.  
With respect to ground one (failing to grant an adjournment): the  
discretionary standard. I agree;  
With respect to ground two (failing to consider evidence): the standard of  
palpable and overriding error. I agree;  
With respect to ground three (implying contractual term): the standard of  
- 9 -  
correctness or, alternatively, palpable and overriding error. In my view, the  
standard is palpable and overriding error;  
d.  
e.  
With respect to ground four (reversal of onus): the standard of correctness. I  
agree; and  
With respect to ground five (improper interpretation): the standard of  
correctness or, alternatively, palpable and overriding error. In my view, the  
standard is palpable and overriding error.  
A.  
Ground one: refusal to grant adjournment  
[32]  
Before the trial, the appellants filed two motions requesting the trial be  
adjourned, alleging the situation warranted an adjournment. The motion judge, in her  
discretion, declined to grant the first motion and, after hearing the second motion, granted  
a seven-week adjournment. The hearing was adjourned from July 6, 2021, to August 25,  
2021.  
[33]  
A decision to refuse an adjournment is discretionary. In Burtt v. Boyle et al.  
(2011), 382 N.B.R. (2d) 206, [2011] N.B.J. No. 471 (QL) (C.A.), this Court dealt with a  
motion for an adjournment where a witness was unavailable to testify at the trial and  
counsel for both parties determined it would be preferable for the trial to be adjourned.  
Richard J.A., as he then was, wrote:  
In my view, a judge of the Court of Appeal should be  
reluctant to interfere with the process leading to a trial in the  
Court of Queen’s Bench, and there are sound policy reasons  
for this. It is not the function of the Court of Appeal to  
supervise every step in the trial process. This is reflected by  
a standard of review of discretionary decisions that is, as I  
have stated, stamped with deference. [para. 16]  
[34]  
Stairs submits, if the appellants were unsatisfied with the decisions rendered  
on either of their motions to adjourn, they were required to file a motion for leave to appeal  
- 10 -  
them. In my view, it is incorrect to state the appellants had to seek leave to appeal. Although  
the motion judge’s decisions, first, dismissing the motion on June 30, 2020, and second,  
granting a seven-week adjournment on July 6, 2022, were interlocutory as they did not  
finally dispose or substantially decide the rights of the parties, the appellants were not  
obligated to seek leave to appeal at that point. It was open to them to wait until they received  
the trial decision. I leave open the question whether in some instances the Court might fault  
a party for not seeking leave to appeal an interlocutory decision. The fact remains that the  
threshold to obtain leave is high and there may be many reasons why one would not seek  
leave but wait until after trial to raise a particular issue. Of course, whether leave to appeal  
is sought from a ruling refusing an adjournment or whether the matter is raised on appeal  
following trial, the standard of review remains the same. Such a ruling is an exercise of  
discretion and will only be reversed on appeal if the ruling was “founded upon an error of  
law, an error in the application of the governing principles or a palpable and overriding  
error in the assessment of the evidence”: The Beaverbrook Canadian Foundation v. The  
Beaverbrook Art Gallery, 2006 NBCA 75, 302 N.B.R. (2d) 161, at para. 4.  
[35]  
In my view, the motion judge did not commit any error that would justify  
appellate interference with her disposition of the adjournment requests. Although the  
appellants contend Louis Bertrand was their key witness and was unavailable to testify  
because of medical issues, in the decision on the first motion for an adjournment the judge  
observed there was insufficient evidence before her to establish the witness could not  
testify (2020 NBQB 141, [2020] N.B.J. No. 198 (QL), at para. 3) as there was no affidavit  
from the witness nor from a treating health care provider. The motion judge stated there  
was no evidence on the record with respect to Louis Bertrand’s “problem,” “treatment,”  
“when he will be better,” “what the condition is,” “how long it has been going on.”  
Therefore, the motion judge determined she did not have the necessary evidence before her  
to justify granting a longer adjournment based on Louis Bertrand’s alleged inability to  
testify at the trial. This was within her discretion as it was also within her discretion to  
grant a seven-week adjournment after hearing the second motion for adjournment.  
[36]  
In this case, the motion judge, in her July 6, 2020 oral decision, stated:  
- 11 -  
The defendants brought a motion requesting an adjournment  
a week prior to trial, which was denied. The basis for the  
earlier request for adjournment was the inability of a key  
witness to participate in trial preparation and to testify due  
to medical challenges. That motion was denied as there was  
simply insufficient evidence furnished to the Court to  
substantiate the medical problems experienced by the  
witness which precluded his participation in the trial process.  
The defendants had not provided an affidavit from the  
witness in question nor from a treating health professional.  
The only evidence furnished in support of the motion was an  
affidavit from the president of the company explaining the  
witness would be compromised should he be compelled to  
testify and attaching a very brief medical note from a  
psychologist.  
[…]  
Whether or not to grant an adjournment is a discretionary  
order of the Court. In exercising such a discretion, the Court  
is mindful that a balance must be struck between the  
prejudice that would be occasioned by the party who is ready  
and wants to proceed and the prejudice that would be  
occasioned by the party who is requesting the adjournment  
on the basis they have been unable to fully prepare. In the  
present matter, I have already refused one request for an  
adjournment with the knowledge that the loss of a key  
witness presented a challenge to the defendant in the  
preparation of their case. These challenges coupled with the  
late service of the documents the defendants now intend to  
use to challenge the plaintiff’s claims tip the scales in favour  
of the defendants.  
I am satisfied that the potential prejudice to the defendant in  
proceeding with this matter this morning outweighs the  
prejudice to the plaintiff in granting a brief adjournment.  
However, I am not prepared to adjourn the matter until 2021  
as requested by the defendants to ensure the participation of  
their currently unavailable witness. The defendants filed no  
evidence in either motion requesting the adjournments to  
substantiate the necessity of postponing the trial until 2021.  
The best means to limit the prejudice to the plaintiff is to  
reschedule the trial as soon as possible. The defendants’  
motion to adjourn the trial is granted pursuant to Rule 54.02  
- 12 -  
with costs in the cause. The trial will proceed on August 25,  
26, and 27, 2020. [paras. 11, 13-14]  
[37]  
There is nothing in the motion judge’s decision that amounts to an error of  
the type that would justify appellate interference on application of the proper standard of  
review. It is obvious the motion judge understood and considered the effects of Louis  
Bertrand’s inability to testify. I would dismiss this ground of appeal.  
B.  
Ground two: failure to properly consider the discovery evidence of Louis Bertrand  
[38]  
[39]  
Considering the judge’s rulings on the requests to adjourn and the ostensible  
unavailability of the witness, the discovery evidence of Louis Bertrand was used at the trial  
with the consent of both parties.  
Both parties agree courts should consider the surrounding circumstances of  
a contract when interpreting it. In Sattva Capital Corp. v. Creston Moly Corp., 2014 SCC  
53, [2014] 2 S.C.R. 633, the Supreme Court wrote the interpretation of a contract is  
inherently fact specific:  
The shift away from the historical approach in Canada  
appears to be based on two developments. The first is the  
adoption of an approach to contractual interpretation which  
directs courts to have regard for the surrounding  
circumstances of the contract – often referred to as the  
factual matrix - when interpreting a written contract (Hall, at  
pp. 13, 21-25 and 127; and J. D. McCamus, The Law of  
Contracts (2nd ed. 2012), at pp. 749-51). The second is the  
explanation of the difference between questions of law and  
questions of mixed fact and law provided in Canada  
(Director of Investigation and Research) v. Southam Inc.,  
[1997] 1 S.C.R. 748, at para. 35, and Housen v. Nikolaisen,  
2002 SCC 33, [2002] 2 S.C.R. 235, at paras. 26 and 31-36.  
Regarding the first development, the interpretation of  
contracts has evolved towards a practical, common-sense  
approach not dominated by technical rules of construction.  
The overriding concern is to determine “the intent of the  
parties and the scope of their understanding” (Jesuit Fathers  
- 13 -  
of Upper Canada v. Guardian Insurance Co. of Canada,  
2006 SCC 21, [2006] 1 S.C.R. 744, at para. 27, per LeBel J.;  
see also Tercon Contractors Ltd. v. British Columbia  
(Transportation and Highways), 2010 SCC 4, [2010] 1  
S.C.R. 69, at paras. 64-65, per Cromwell J.). To do so, a  
decision-maker must read the contract as a whole, giving the  
words used their ordinary and grammatical meaning,  
consistent with the surrounding circumstances known to the  
parties at the time of formation of the contract. Consideration  
of the surrounding circumstances recognizes that  
ascertaining contractual intention can be difficult when  
looking at words on their own, because words alone do not  
have an immutable or absolute meaning:  
No contracts are made in a vacuum: there is always  
a setting in which they have to be placed [...]. In a  
commercial contract it is certainly right that the court  
should know the commercial purpose of the contract  
and this in turn presupposes knowledge of the  
genesis of the transaction, the background, the  
context, the market in which the parties are  
operating.  
(Reardon Smith Line, at p. 574, per Lord Wilberforce)  
The meaning of words is often derived from a number of  
contextual factors, including the purpose of the agreement  
and the nature of the relationship created by the agreement  
(see Moore Realty Inc. v. Manitoba Motor League, 2003  
MBCA 71, 173 Man. R. (2d) 300, at para. 15, per Hamilton  
J.A.; see also Hall, at p. 22; and McCamus, at pp. 749-50).  
As stated by Lord Hoffmann in Investors Compensation  
Scheme Ltd. v. West Bromwich Building Society, [1998] 1  
All E.R. 98 (H.L.):  
The meaning which a document (or any other  
utterance) would convey to a reasonable man is not  
the same thing as the meaning of its words. The  
meaning of words is a matter of dictionaries and  
grammars; the meaning of the document is what the  
parties using those words against the relevant  
background would reasonably have been understood  
to mean. [p. 115]  
[…]  
- 14 -  
Although that caution was expressed in the context of a  
negligence case, it applies, in my opinion, to contractual  
interpretation as well. As mentioned above, the goal of  
contractual interpretation, to ascertain the objective  
intentions of the parties, is inherently fact specific. The close  
relationship between the selection and application of  
principles of contractual interpretation and the construction  
ultimately given to the instrument means that the  
circumstances in which a question of law can be extricated  
from the interpretation process will be rare. In the absence  
of a legal error of the type described above, no appeal lies  
under the AA from an arbitrator’s interpretation of a  
contract. [paras. 46-48 and 55]  
[40]  
[41]  
The appellants submit the trial judge “substantially ignored” the evidence  
of Louis Bertrand and only referenced the evidence that was consistent with Randy Stairs’  
evidence at trial.  
According to the appellants, the trial judge had only the discovery evidence  
of Louis Bertrand available to him measured against the testimony of Randy Stairs at trial.  
The appellants say the trial judge favoured Randy Stairs’ evidence on essentially all  
material issues including: (1) Louis Bertrand’s “non-verbal” approval of pricing; and (2)  
the different contexts of the 2017 quote and the 2018 agreement.  
[42]  
The appellants contend the trial judge disregarded Louis Bertrand’s  
evidence on all relevant points and favoured Randy Stairs’ evidence without undertaking  
an assessment of Louis Bertrand’s credibility. According to the appellants, because the  
adjournment was not granted and the key witness was unable to testify, the trial judge  
should have provided cogent and detailed reasoning for rejecting Louis Bertrand’s  
testimony. The appellants claim the evidence was that Randy Stairs guaranteed a maximum  
price of $90,000.00, he did not quote $12.50 per tonne of extra soil until after he had  
invoiced $90,000, and he had waived the exclusion for unstable ground because he was  
dealing with soil on which he had worked in 2012. The appellants say the trial judge did  
not analyze any of Mr. Bertrand’s evidence that was contrary to Stairs’ position. As a result,  
the decision warrants no deference and is flawed by a palpable and overriding error.  
- 15 -  
[43]  
A review of the record does not indicate the trial judge failed to properly  
analyze the evidence before him. In my view, he provided a detailed analysis of all that  
evidence. Under the circumstances, the discovery evidence was the only evidence of Louis  
Bertrand that could be considered. The judge’s acceptance of certain evidence over other  
evidence raises a question of fact and must be reviewed on the palpable and overriding  
standard.  
[44]  
The appellants also submit the trial judge’s decision is reviewable on the  
standard of correctness because he failed to adhere to the rule in Browne v. Dunn when he  
preferred Stairs’ evidence over the appellants’ without the benefit of the direct testimony  
of Louis Bertrand. With respect, I do not agree. Recall the parties agreed to read in the  
discovery testimony of Louis Bertrand at the commencement of the trial.  
[45]  
The rule in Browne v. Dunn, [1893] J.C.J. No. 5 (QL), has no application.  
The appellants rely on Shephard v. R., 2019 NBCA 76, [2019] N.B.J. No. 313 (QL). In my  
view, this case is distinguishable from Shephard. Louis Bertrand did not testify at trial. The  
parties agreed to use his discovery evidence. At no point during Randy Stairs’ trial  
testimony did counsel for the appellants object to anything he said respecting his  
discussions with Louis Bertrand during his direct examination. I would dismiss this ground  
of appeal.  
C.  
Ground three: implied contractual term  
[46]  
[47]  
The appellants submit the contract between the parties was a fixed-price  
contract and the excavation and removal of unstable ground was included in the price. They  
contend the trial judge implied a term to the contract between the parties, allowing Stairs  
to claim an extra amount for the removal and replacement of unstable ground.  
Terms may be implied in a contract based on the existence of: (1) custom  
or usage; (2) the legal incidence of a particular class or kind of contract; or (3) “the  
- 16 -  
presumed intention of the parties, where the implied term must be necessary ‘to give  
business efficacy to a contract or as otherwise meeting the ‘officious bystander’ test as a  
term which the parties would say, if questioned, that they had obviously assumed’”: Briggs  
v. Desjardins Seed Farms Ltd., 2019 NBCA 2, [2019] N.B.J. No. 2 (QL), at para. 16.  
[48]  
The appellants submit the trial judge did not apply these principles correctly  
and erred in law by implying the unstable ground exclusion in the 2018 agreement. In the  
alternative, the appellants say the trial judge committed a palpable and overriding error  
through his disregard of Louis Bertrand’s evidence to the contrary. I do not agree. The trial  
judge found the exclusion clause contained in the 2017 quote formed part of the contract  
between the parties; therefore, there was no need to imply such a clause. It already existed.  
[49]  
Sonny Phillips was declared to be an expert witness regarding construction  
project management and the bidding of construction jobs. He testified as a witness for  
Stairs. Mr. Phillips testified that it is accepted industry practice that an exclusion clause for  
the removal and replacement of unstable ground can be considered an implied term  
between the parties when there is no geotechnical report available to the contractor. To do  
otherwise would place an unknown risk on a contractor as the presence and quantity of  
unstable ground could not be known (Trial decision, para. 69). This would be a deterrent  
to contractors agreeing to a fixed-price contract in the absence of a geotechnical report.  
[50]  
The trial judge found that, given Stairs’ knowledge of the property and in  
particular that the property contained unstable ground, the exclusion clause contained in  
the 2017 quote was very important to Stairs Building (para. 68). Further, the judge found  
it would not be reasonable for Stairs to engage in a fixed-price contract when Stairs knew  
there was unstable ground on the property (para. 72).  
[51]  
The trial judge determined the exclusion clause contained in the 2017 quote  
formed part of the contract between the parties and therefore concluded Stairs had not  
agreed to a fixed-price contract as alleged by the appellants. The industry standard implying  
an exclusion clause to a contract when no geotechnical report was available to the  
- 17 -  
contractor was further evidence to support the fact that Stairs would not have agreed to a  
fixed-price contract in the circumstances (paras. 65 and 69).  
[52]  
Stairs submits the trial judge did not impute an exclusion clause into the  
contract between the parties as Stairs had already excluded the excavation and removal of  
unstable ground in its written 2017 quote, which the trial judge found formed part of the  
contract between the parties (para. 65).  
[53]  
[54]  
The contract clearly provided for a potential increase in price because of  
possible unstable soil conditions. There is no dispute about that, and the judge interpreted  
the evidence accordingly.  
The appellants contend this was a fixed-price (guaranteed) contract and the  
clause in the contract relating to the exclusion for unstable soil must be ignored because  
Louis Bertrand did not agree to any increase in cost. I do not agree. A report was prepared  
by Gemtec, with the knowledge of both parties, specifically to address this issue and it  
confirmed the presence of the unstable soil. Randy Stairs says the engineer, Mr. Kalaba,  
discussed the report with Louis Bertrand and himself. This was when the price of $12.50  
per tonne was agreed upon. Louis Bertrand denied this at discovery, notwithstanding he  
was present on site throughout the excavation and aggregate replacement work. Moreover,  
he testified he told Randy Stairs to follow the advice and instructions of Gemtec, whose  
engineer testified at trial for the appellants. There is no evidentiary basis to accept this extra  
work would be done for nothing. Stairs would not have proceeded without Louis Bertrand’s  
approval (the “nod”). That is how they had traditionally done business.  
[55]  
I discern no palpable and overriding error justifying appellate intervention  
and would dismiss this ground of appeal.  
- 18 -  
D.  
Ground four: reversal of onus  
[56]  
The appellants submit the trial judge placed the onus on them to disprove  
the damages claimed by Stairs. They say they noted various discrepancies between the  
amount of aggregate Stairs said it delivered and the slips provided by Matt Harris and Son  
Ltd. indicating the amount of aggregate that was actually delivered. They submit the trial  
judge faulted them because their pleadings “say nothing about defending the claim on the  
basis that Stairs could not reconcile with precision every load delivered from the Harris  
pit” (para. 82), thereby ignoring the rule that damages are always in issue unless  
specifically admitted. According to the appellants, the trial judge also found they had the  
onus of disproving Stairs’ stated damages, and then ruled out their ability to “go behind”  
the invoices because they maintained it was a fixed-price contract.  
[57]  
Stairs submitted invoices from Matt Harris and Son Ltd., the gravel  
provider, which set out, among other things, the quantity of aggregate purchased by Stairs  
for the job. The invoices indicated that a total of 12,825 tonnes of aggregate were sold to  
Stairs for the job, 7,825 tonnes of which were used to replace the unstable ground. Stairs  
also submitted as evidence various delivery slips from Matt Harris and Son Ltd. to provide  
confirmation for its invoices for the aggregate. The trial judge found the “[t]he vast  
majority of the claim can be traced by way of the various slips and records provided by Mr.  
Harris” (para. 43).  
[58]  
[59]  
Mr. Phillips testified the 2017 quote was low and a very reasonable price to  
do the job. He further testified that the price of $12.50 per tonne to replace and compact  
the unstable ground was reasonable. This evidence was not challenged at trial. The trial  
judge found the extra work completed by Stairs was necessary to complete the job.  
A review of the record reveals the trial judge’s comments did not place an  
onus on the appellants to disprove the damages claimed by Stairs. The Statement of  
Defence filed by the appellants did not allege the extras claimed by Stairs were excessive.  
Furthermore, the trial judge questioned whether Stairs was required to provide the delivery  
- 19 -  
slips in addition to the invoices to prove its damages as the invoices contained necessary  
information to quantify the claim for damages.  
[60]  
The findings of the trial judge did not reverse the onus such that the  
appellants had to disprove Stairs’ quantification of its damages. I would dismiss this ground  
of appeal.  
E.  
Ground five: interpretation  
[61]  
The appellants argue the trial judge erred in his interpretation of the  
contract. They say the decision is reversible, either on the standard of correctness or that  
of palpable and overriding error, because the trial judge failed to consider the surrounding  
circumstances. They submit the trial judge ignored:  
a.  
b.  
c.  
Mr. Bertrand’s evidence that Mr. Stairs “guaranteed” his price would not go  
above $90,000;  
Mr. Bertrand’s evidence that Mr. Stairs did not quote him $12.50 per tonne  
until after he had invoiced the appellants $90,000; and  
Mr. Bertrand’s evidence that Stairs gave its 2017 quote in November for a  
different project but the 2018 agreement was struck in the summer, with a  
contemplated completion date before the cold season, and for work in soil in  
which Stairs had worked in 2012.  
[62]  
In my view, this ground appears to repeat grounds two and three. For the  
above reasons, I conclude the trial judge did not err in interpreting the contract between the  
parties. I discern no errors that would justify appellate interference on the standard either  
of correctness or of palpable and overriding error. I would dismiss this ground of appeal.  
- 20 -  
VII. Disposition  
[63]  
I would dismiss the appeal with costs in the amount of $3,000.  
Version française de la décision de la Cour rendue par  
LA JUGE QUIGG  
I.  
Introduction  
[1]  
[2]  
Le présent appel porte sur l’interprétation d’un contrat relatif à la  
préparation des travaux de terrassement en vue de l’agrandissement d’un bâtiment existant  
appartenant aux appelantes, 666917 N.B. Inc. et T.C.I. Manufacturing Inc.  
La question principale est de savoir s’il s’agissait d’un contrat à prix fixe  
d’un montant de 90 000 $, comme le prétendaient les appelantes, ou si le coût pour  
l’enlèvement et le remplacement du terrain instable constituait un [TRADUCTION] « coût  
supplémentaire » au titre du contrat.  
[3]  
Le juge de première instance a estimé que la preuve n’étayait pas les  
allégations des appelantes et que Stairs Building (2004) Ltd., l’intimée, avait prouvé ses  
dommages-intérêts au procès. Je suis du même avis. Je rejetterais l’appel pour les motifs  
exposés ci-après.  
II.  
Contexte  
[4]  
Stairs est présente dans le secteur de la construction depuis environ 40 ans.  
Elle s’occupe principalement de l’excavation et de la préparation des travaux de  
terrassement pour les fondations de bâtiments. Randy Stairs est le principal responsable de  
la société. L’appelante 666917 est propriétaire d’un terrain et de locaux sis au  
55, rue Blizzard, à Fredericton. TCI Manufacturing est liée à 666917 et exerce ses activités  
à cet endroit. Les administrateurs des deux sociétés sont Louis Bertrand et son frère,  
Paul Bertrand.  
- 2 -  
[5]  
En 1994, les appelantes ont érigé une construction sur le bien. En 2012, elles  
ont souhaité construire une annexe au bâtiment d’origine et ont communiqué avec Stairs  
pour lui demander de fournir un devis pour la préparation des travaux de terrassement pour  
l’annexe. Les appelantes ont retenu les services de la société d’ingénierie Gemtec pour  
fournir un rapport géotechnique afin de déterminer si le sol convenait pour la fondation du  
bâtiment. Stairs a reçu copie du rapport géotechnique avant de présenter un devis écrit daté  
du 12 octobre 2012.  
[6]  
Les appelantes ont demandé des changements mineurs au projet de 2012 et  
Stairs a dû effectuer des travaux supplémentaires en conséquence. Aucune modification  
écrite n’a été apportée au devis de 2012 et Stairs a facturé les appelantes pour les travaux  
supplémentaires et en a reçu paiement. Bien que la taille accrue de l’annexe et le prix aient  
changé, toutes les parties ont continué à travailler sur le fondement du devis de 2012. Le  
rapport géotechnique de 2012 a confirmé que le bien comportait du terrain instable, lequel  
a dû être enlevé par Stairs et remplacé par des granulats avant que l’annexe puisse être  
construite sur la fondation. Par suite des travaux effectués en 2012-2013, Stairs savait que  
le bien comportait du terrain instable.  
[7]  
Au début de l’année 2017, les appelantes se sont de nouveau adressées à  
Stairs afin d’obtenir un devis pour les travaux de terrassement en vue de la construction  
d’une nouvelle annexe au bâtiment. Stairs a présenté un devis écrit daté du  
10 novembre 2017 pour un montant de 114 626 $. Ce devis a été fourni sans qu’un nouveau  
rapport géotechnique ait été préparé. Par conséquent, le devis de 2017 comportait une  
clause excluant l’excavation de terrain instable, car, forte de l’expérience qu’elle avait  
acquise en travaillant sur le bien en 2012-2013, Stairs était consciente du fait qu’il pouvait  
y avoir des problèmes.  
[8]  
Après novembre 2017, les appelantes ont réduit la taille de l’annexe et ont  
demandé d’autres changements mineurs dans l’envergure des travaux. Cela a entraîné une  
diminution du devis de 2017, qui est passé de 114 626 $ à 90 000 $. La nature des travaux  
à entreprendre par Stairs est demeurée la même. Le devis de 2017, qui excluait l’excavation  
- 3 -  
de terrain instable, faisait partie du contrat liant les parties. Tout comme dans le cas du  
projet de 2012, le changement de prix a été convenu verbalement, les parties ne l’ayant pas  
constaté par un écrit.  
[9]  
En août 2018, Stairs a entamé ses travaux sans le bénéfice d’un rapport  
géotechnique concernant le sol où la fondation devait être construite. Louis Bertrand faisait  
office de gestionnaire du projet de construction pour le compte des appelantes.  
[10]  
Puisque Stairs a insisté, les appelantes ont de nouveau retenu les services de  
Gemtec pour préparer un rapport géotechnique, lequel a été achevé le 19 septembre 2018.  
Le rapport a été établi par M. Kalaba, un ingénieur, qui a témoigné qu’il l’avait passé en  
revue avec Louis Bertrand et Randy Stairs sur les lieux. Le rapport confirmait que l’endroit  
où l’annexe devait être construite comportait beaucoup de terrain instable, lequel devait  
être enlevé et remplacé par du granulat approuvé. Randy Stairs a témoigné  
qu’immédiatement après que M. Kalaba eut passé en revue le rapport avec Louis Bertrand  
et lui-même, il a informé Louis Bertrand qu’il facturerait 12,50 $ la tonne pour excaver le  
terrain instable et le remplacer par du granulat approuvé. Randy Stairs a témoigné que  
Louis Bertrand lui a fait un [TRADUCTION] « signe de tête » lui signifiant d’aller de  
l’avant et de suivre les instructions de M. Kalaba. Louis Bertrand nie ce fait. M. Kalaba a  
également déclaré que Randy Stairs et Louis Bertrand s’étaient entretenus immédiatement  
après qu’il eut passé en revue le rapport avec eux, mais qu’il n’était pas au courant de ce  
qui avait été discuté. À l’interrogatoire préalable, Louis Bertrand a déclaré n’avoir pas parlé  
du rapport de Gemtec à M. Kalaba ou à qui que ce soit.  
[11]  
L’action sous-jacente était une revendication de privilège de construction  
que faisait valoir Stairs à l’égard d’un bien appartenant aux appelantes. Les appelantes  
soutiennent que le contrat était un contrat à prix fixe de 90 000 $ et qu’il n’existait aucune  
entente aux termes de laquelle Stairs recevrait un supplément de 12,50 $ par tonne pour  
enlever et remplacer le terrain instable.  
- 4 -  
[12]  
Il n’est pas contesté que Louis Bertrand était présent sur le chantier tous les  
jours et qu’il a observé tout le travail supplémentaire effectué par Stairs Building pour  
excaver et remplacer le terrain instable. Il n’est pas non plus contesté que tout ce travail  
supplémentaire était nécessaire pour réaliser le projet. Stairs a acheté 7 825 tonnes de  
granulats supplémentaires à une gravière appartenant à Matt Harris & Son Ltd. pour  
remplacer le terrain instable. Les factures de ces achats et les bordereaux de livraison ont  
été versés comme pièces au procès. Les bordereaux de livraison indiquaient les numéros  
des factures qui ont été envoyées à Stairs. Un petit nombre de bordereaux de livraison  
manquaient; cependant, la revendication pouvait en grande partie être établie au moyen des  
bordereaux et registres fournis par M. Harris.  
[13]  
Bien que, dans l’exposé de la défense, les appelantes aient affirmé que le  
contrat était un contrat à prix fixe de 90 000 $, elles n’ont pas invoqué, comme moyen de  
défense subsidiaire, que le montant revendiqué en supplément par Stairs était excessif ou  
inexact. En substance, l’exposé de la défense était axé sur l’allégation selon laquelle le  
contrat était un contrat à prix fixe de 90 000 $.  
A.  
Motions préalables au procès  
[14]  
Le procès était prévu pour les 6, 7 et 8 juillet 2020. Le 25 juin 2020, les  
appelantes ont déposé une motion sollicitant un ajournement, car Louis Bertrand, leur  
principal témoin, était sous traitement médical et psychologique et son professionnel  
traitant lui avait conseillé de ne pas assister au procès. Le fondement de cette motion était  
que les questions clés avaient trait aux clauses du contrat oral intervenu entre Randy Stairs  
et Louis Bertrand et que, dans le cas où Stairs aurait gain de cause, elle se verrait attribuer  
des dommages-intérêts. Selon les appelantes, pour comprendre les clauses de l’entente, il  
fallait se fonder sur le témoignage de ces deux témoins. Ils étaient les parties qui avaient  
négocié les clauses du contrat essentiellement oral, et tous deux avaient témoigné à  
l’interrogatoire préalable.  
- 5 -  
[15]  
Dans les mois qui ont précédé le procès, Louis Bertrand se faisait traiter  
pour des problèmes de santé mentale. Selon les appelantes, son fournisseur de traitement a  
informé Paul Bertrand que Louis Bertrand ne devrait pas participer à un procès tout au  
moins avant le début de l’année 2021. À l’audition de la première motion, le 30 juin 2020,  
et de la seconde, le 6 juillet 2020, les appelantes ont sollicité des ajournements du procès.  
Les demandes d’ajournement étaient fondées sur la non-disponibilité de Louis Bertrand  
pour cause de ses problèmes de santé mentale.  
[16]  
La première motion a été entendue le 30 juin 2020. La juge saisie de la  
motion a refusé l’ajournement, estimant que les appelantes n’avaient pas produit  
suffisamment d’éléments de preuve pour démontrer la nécessité de reporter le procès en  
2021. Lors de la deuxième motion, d’autres éléments de preuve, provenant du fournisseur  
de traitement de Louis Bertrand et expliquant la non-disponibilité de ce dernier pour le  
procès, ont été déposés. Après la deuxième motion, la juge a conclu qu’il n’y avait toujours  
pas suffisamment d’éléments de preuve pour justifier le report du procès en 2021, mais a  
accordé un ajournement de sept semaines pour permettre à l’avocat des appelantes  
d’examiner les documents récemment communiqués par Stairs et a ordonné que le procès  
se tienne les 25, 26 et 27 août 2020. Les dépens afférents à chacune des motions ont été  
adjugés contre les appelantes. Les appelantes n’ont pas demandé l’autorisation d’interjeter  
appel des décisions relatives aux deux motions.  
[17]  
Un autre juge de première instance a entamé le procès le 25 août 2020, et  
Louis Bertrand n’y a pas participé. Du consentement des parties, la déposition de  
l’interrogatoire préalable de Louis Bertrand a été présentée en preuve en vertu de la  
règle 32.11(7)b).  
B.  
La position des appelantes  
[18]  
Selon les appelantes, l’absence de Louis Bertrand a privé la cour  
essentiellement de la moitié des éléments de preuve nécessaires concernant les clauses de  
l’entente verbale intervenue entre les appelantes et Stairs; elle a empêché l’avocat des  
- 6 -  
appelantes de procéder à l’interrogatoire principal de Louis Bertrand ou à son  
réinterrogatoire; et elle a entravé la capacité de l’avocat de contre-interroger Randy Stairs  
sur les éléments de preuve qu’il avait présentés au procès. Le juge de première instance a  
entendu le témoignage de Paul Bertrand selon lequel son frère, Louis, était responsable de  
la supervision de tous les travaux sur le bâtiment et des projets d’agrandissement et que  
c’était surtout lui qui faisait affaire avec Stairs.  
[19]  
Les appelantes soutiennent que l’effet de l’absence de Louis Bertrand sur  
l’issue du procès est évident d’un bout à l’autre de la décision du juge de première instance.  
Elles affirment que, bien que le témoignage de Louis Bertrand à l’interrogatoire préalable  
soit diamétralement opposé aux conclusions dégagées par le juge sur plusieurs points, la  
décision mentionne à peine la preuve présentée par Louis Bertrand. Les appelantes font  
valoir que le juge de première instance a conclu que, bien que les appelantes aient soutenu  
que Stairs avait omis de les aviser de l’augmentation du prix liée à l’instabilité du terrain,  
[TRADUCTION] « aucun élément de preuve substantiel n’a permis d’étayer ce point »  
(par. 10). Les appelantes soutiennent que le juge de première instance n’a accordé aucun  
poids ni aucune importance au témoignage de Louis Bertrand à l’interrogatoire préalable,  
selon lequel il ne savait rien de l’augmentation du prix avant que Stairs n’ait présenté des  
factures totalisant 90 000 $.  
[20]  
Les appelantes soutiennent que le juge de première instance a attaché  
beaucoup d’importance aux conversations entre Randy Stairs et Louis Bertrand, au cours  
desquelles ce dernier aurait donné un consentement non verbal aux prix et aux frais ou lui  
aurait dit de [TRADUCTION] « simplement continuer » (par. 18), conversations que  
Louis Bertrand a contestées dans son témoignage à l’interrogatoire préalable. Les  
appelantes affirment que le juge de première instance leur a reproché de ne pas avoir retenu  
les services d’un expert-comptable judiciaire pour examiner les factures de Stairs. Elles  
soutiennent qu’en agissant de la sorte, le juge de première instance a effectivement inversé  
la charge d’établir la preuve des dommages-intérêts, obligeant ainsi les appelantes à réfuter  
les prétentions de Stairs.  
- 7 -  
[21]  
Selon les appelantes, le juge de première instance a conclu que l’entente  
verbale de 2018 intervenue entre les appelantes et Stairs constituait essentiellement  
[TRADUCTION] une « modification verbale » du devis de 2017 fourni par Stairs. Dès  
lors, les appelantes allèguent qu’il a conclu que le contrat verbal de 2018 comportait une  
clause implicite – une clause écrite relative à un devis fourni un an plus tôt au sujet d’un  
projet différent.  
[22]  
En outre, les appelantes soutiennent que le juge de première instance a  
commis une erreur lorsqu’il a rejeté les doutes concernant la quantité de granulat qui avait  
été livrée. Le juge de première instance a estimé que, puisque les appelantes croyaient qu’il  
s’agissait d’un contrat à prix fixe, elles ne pouvaient pas remettre en question le montant  
figurant sur la facture ni contester les dommages-intérêts réclamés.  
C.  
La position de l’intimée  
[23]  
S’agissant des affirmations des appelantes au sujet du refus de la juge saisie  
des motions d’accorder les ajournements, les intimées soutiennent que les éléments de  
preuve dont la juge disposait concernant la comparution de Louis Bertrand ne justifiaient  
pas l’ajournement. Dans leurs observations, les appelantes prétendent que la juge saisie des  
motions a accordé un ajournement de quatre semaines. En fait, il s’agissait d’un  
ajournement d’environ sept semaines – du 6 juillet 2021 au 25 août 2021.  
[24]  
[25]  
Stairs soutient également que, si les appelantes n’étaient pas satisfaites des  
décisions de la juge saisie des motions quant à l’ajournement, elles auraient dû déposer une  
motion en autorisation d’appel de ces décisions interlocutoires. De plus, les appelantes  
n’ont pas sollicité un autre ajournement avant le procès ou au début de celui-ci.  
S’agissant de l’affirmation des appelantes selon laquelle le juge de première  
instance a conclu que le contrat de 2018 comportait une clause implicite, les intimées  
affirment qu’il n’était pas nécessaire de conclure à l’existence d’une telle clause puisqu’elle  
faisait déjà partie du contrat de 2017 et faisait donc partie de l’entente verbale de 2018.  
- 8 -  
III.  
Moyens d’appel  
[26]  
À l’appui du présent appel, les appelantes invoquent les moyens suivants :  
i.  
La juge saisie des motions a commis une erreur lorsqu’elle a refusé d’ajourner  
le procès malgré la non-disponibilité d’un témoin. Il en a résulté un procès  
fondamentalement inéquitable;  
ii.  
Le juge de première instance a commis une erreur du fait qu’il n’a pas tenu  
dûment compte du témoignage de Louis Bertrand à l’interrogatoire préalable  
et de ses déclarations non contredites concernant le contrat. Par conséquent,  
le juge ne disposait pas de l’ensemble de la preuve;  
iii.  
iv.  
Le juge de première instance, se fondant sur une interprétation erronée de la  
preuve, a estimé à tort que l’entente verbale intervenue entre les parties  
comportait une clause implicite;  
Le juge de première instance n’a pas tenu dûment compte des éléments de  
preuve concernant les dommages-intérêts et a appliqué une norme juridique  
incorrecte à la demande de Stairs et à la demande reconventionnelle des  
appelantes. Il en a résulté l’inversion de la charge de la preuve obligeant les  
appelantes à réfuter la preuve des dommages-intérêts;  
v.  
Le juge de première instance a commis une erreur dans l’interprétation du  
contrat.  
- 9 -  
V.  
Norme de contrôle  
[27]  
[28]  
Les appelantes soulèvent cinq moyens et affirment que les trois normes de  
contrôle sont en jeu : la norme discrétionnaire, la norme de la décision correcte et la norme  
de l’erreur manifeste et dominante.  
La norme discrétionnaire témoigne du degré élevé de déférence que  
commandent les décisions discrétionnaires. En appel, la Cour ne peut infirmer une décision  
judiciaire discrétionnaire que si elle est fondée sur une erreur de droit, une erreur dans  
l’application des principes directeurs ou une erreur manifeste et dominante dans  
l’évaluation de la preuve : Maisonneuve, Hamelin, Martin Ltd. c. JWT Campground Inc.,  
[2021] A.N.-B. no 205 (QL) (CA), au par. 45.  
[29]  
S’agissant des autres normes, les questions de droit sont susceptibles de  
contrôle suivant la norme de la décision correcte, tandis que les questions de fait sont  
susceptibles de contrôle suivant la norme de l’erreur manifeste et dominante : Vautour et  
autre c. Sa Majesté la Reine du chef de la Province du Nouveau-Brunswick et autre,  
2021 NBCA 4, [2021] A.N.-B. no 18 (QL), au par. 31; Housen c. Nikolaisen, 2002 CSC  
33, [2002] 2 R.C.S. 235.  
[30]  
Les questions mixtes de fait et de droit sont susceptibles de contrôle suivant  
la norme de l’erreur manifeste et dominante, à moins qu’il soit possible d’isoler, parmi les  
éléments mixtes de l’analyse, une question de droit, auquel cas la norme de contrôle est  
celle de la décision correcte. Par exemple, il devient possible d’isoler une question de droit  
lorsqu’on a « appliqu[é] le mauvais principe ou néglig[é] un élément essentiel d’un critère  
juridique ou un facteur pertinent » (voir Sattva Capital Corp. c. Creston Moly Corp.,  
2014 CSC 53, [2014] 2 R.C.S. 633, au par. 53; Algo Enterprises Ltd. c.  
Repap New Brunswick Inc., 2016 NBCA 35, 450 R.N.-B. (2e) 238, au par. 18; Vautour, au  
par. 31).  
[31]  
Les appelantes soutiennent que les normes de contrôle relatives à chaque  
moyen d’appel sont les suivantes :  
- 10 -  
a.  
b.  
c.  
S’agissant du premier moyen (omission de prononcer l’ajournement) : la  
norme discrétionnaire. Je suis du même avis;  
S’agissant du deuxième moyen (omission de tenir compte de la preuve) : la  
norme de l’erreur manifeste et dominante. Je suis du même avis;  
S’agissant du troisième moyen (conclusion quant à l’existence d’une clause  
implicite dans le contrat) : la norme de la décision correcte ou,  
subsidiairement, celle de l’erreur manifeste et dominante. À mon avis, la  
norme applicable est celle de l’erreur manifeste et dominante;  
d.  
e.  
S’agissant du quatrième moyen (inversion de la charge de la preuve) : la  
norme de la décision correcte. Je suis du même avis;  
S’agissant du cinquième moyen (interprétation incorrecte) : la norme de la  
décision correcte ou, subsidiairement, celle de l’erreur manifeste et  
dominante. À mon avis, la norme applicable est celle de l’erreur manifeste et  
dominante.  
A.  
Premier moyen : refus de prononcer l’ajournement  
[32]  
Avant le procès, les appelantes ont déposé deux motions par lesquelles elles  
sollicitaient l’ajournement du procès, alléguant que la situation justifiait un ajournement.  
Dans l’exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire, la juge saisie des motions a refusé de faire  
droit à la première motion et, après avoir entendu la deuxième, a prononcé un ajournement  
de sept semaines. L’audience a été ajournée du 6 juillet 2021 au 25 août 2021.  
[33]  
La décision de refuser de prononcer l’ajournement est discrétionnaire. Dans  
l’arrêt Burtt c. Boyle et al., (2011), 382 R.N.-B. (2e) 206, [2011] A.N.-B. no 471 (QL) (CA),  
notre Cour a traité d’une motion en ajournement dans un cas où un témoin n’était pas  
- 11 -  
disponible pour témoigner au procès et que les avocats des deux parties avaient estimé qu’il  
serait préférable que le procès soit ajourné. Le juge d’appel Richard, tel était alors son titre,  
a écrit :  
À mon avis, un juge de la Cour d’appel devrait hésiter à  
s’immiscer dans un processus menant à un procès devant la  
Cour du Banc de la Reine et il y a de solides raisons de  
principe à cela. Il n’appartient pas à la Cour d’appel de  
superviser chaque étape du processus d’instruction. On en  
trouve la confirmation dans l’existence d’une norme de  
révision des décisions d’ordre discrétionnaire qui, comme je  
l’ai dit, est marquée par la déférence. [par. 16]  
[34]  
Selon Stairs, si les appelantes n’étaient pas satisfaites des décisions rendues  
relativement à l’une ou l’autre de leurs motions en ajournement, elles devaient déposer une  
motion en autorisation d’appel. À mon avis, on ne saurait affirmer que les appelantes  
devaient solliciter l’autorisation d’interjeter appel. Bien que les décisions de la juge saisie  
des motions, d’abord, de rejeter la motion le 30 juin 2020, puis, d’accorder un ajournement  
de sept semaines le 6 juillet 2022, aient été interlocutoires puisqu’elles n’établissaient pas  
définitivement ou de façon substantielle les droits des parties, les appelantes n’étaient pas  
tenues de solliciter l’autorisation d’interjeter appel à ce moment-là. Il leur était loisible  
d’attendre de recevoir la décision de première instance. Je ne me prononce pas sur la  
question de savoir si, dans certains cas, la Cour pourrait reprocher à une partie de ne pas  
avoir sollicité l’autorisation d’interjeter appel d’une décision interlocutoire. Il n’en  
demeure pas moins que le seuil qu’il faut franchir pour obtenir l’autorisation est élevé et  
qu’il peut y avoir de nombreuses raisons expliquant pourquoi on ne solliciterait pas  
l’autorisation, mais qu’on attendrait plutôt la fin du procès pour soulever une question  
particulière. De toute évidence, que l’on demande l’autorisation d’interjeter appel d’une  
décision refusant un ajournement ou que la question soit soulevée en appel après le procès,  
la norme de contrôle demeure la même. Une telle décision découle de l’exercice d’un  
pouvoir discrétionnaire et ne sera infirmée en appel que si elle était « fondée sur une erreur  
de droit, une erreur dans l’application des principes directeurs ou une erreur manifeste et  
dominante dans l’appréciation de la preuve » : La Beaverbrook Canadian Foundation c.  
La Galerie d’art Beaverbrook, 2006 NBCA 75, 302 R.N.-B. (2e) 161, au par. 4.  
- 12 -  
[35]  
À mon avis, la juge saisie des motions n’a pas commis d’erreur qui  
justifierait une intervention en appel dans ses décisions relatives aux demandes  
d’ajournement. Bien que les appelantes soutiennent que Louis Bertrand était leur témoin  
clé et qu’il n’était pas disponible pour témoigner en raison de problèmes médicaux, dans  
la décision relative à la première motion en ajournement, la juge a fait remarquer qu’une  
preuve suffisante ne lui avait pas été présentée pour établir que le témoin ne pouvait pas  
témoigner (2020 NBBR 141, [2020] A.N.-B. no 198 (QL), au par. 3), aucun affidavit du  
témoin ni d’un fournisseur de soins de santé traitant n’ayant été déposé. La juge saisie des  
motions a déclaré qu’il n’y avait aucune preuve au dossier au sujet du [TRADUCTION]  
« problème » de Louis Bertrand ou de son [TRADUCTION] « traitement », de la question  
de savoir [TRADUCTION] « quand il ira mieux », de [TRADUCTION] « son problème »,  
de la question de savoir [TRADUCTION] « depuis combien de temps cela durait ». Dès  
lors, la juge saisie des motions a estimé qu’elle ne disposait pas de la preuve nécessaire  
pour justifier l’octroi d’un ajournement plus long sur le fondement de la prétendue  
incapacité de Louis Bertrand de témoigner au procès. Cela relevait de son pouvoir  
discrétionnaire, tout comme il relevait également de son pouvoir discrétionnaire de  
prononcer un ajournement de sept semaines après l’audition de la deuxième motion en  
ajournement.  
[36]  
En l’espèce, la juge saisie des motions, dans sa décision orale du  
6 juillet 2020, a déclaré :  
[TRADUCTION]  
Une semaine avant la tenue du procès, les défenderesses ont  
présenté une motion en ajournement qui a été rejetée. Cette  
demande d’ajournement antérieure reposait sur l’incapacité  
d’un témoin clé, pour des raisons de santé, de participer à la  
préparation du procès et de témoigner. Cette motion a été  
rejetée parce que la preuve produite était tout simplement  
insuffisante pour démontrer l’existence des problèmes de  
santé empêchant le témoin de participer au processus  
judiciaire. Les défenderesses n’avaient produit d’affidavit ni  
du témoin en cause ni d’un professionnel de la santé traitant.  
Le seul élément de preuve présenté à l’appui de la motion  
- 13 -  
était un affidavit du président de la société expliquant que le  
témoin subirait une atteinte s’il était forcé de témoigner,  
auquel affidavit était joint un très bref avis médical rédigé  
par une psychologue.  
[...]  
L’octroi d’un ajournement relève du pouvoir discrétionnaire  
de la Cour. Dans l’exercice de ce pouvoir, la Cour est  
consciente qu’il lui faut mettre en balance le préjudice causé,  
d’un côté, à la partie qui est prête et disposée à aller de  
l’avant, de l’autre côté, à la partie qui sollicite l’ajournement  
parce qu’elle n’a pu pleinement se préparer. En l’espèce, j’ai  
déjà rejeté une demande d’ajournement en sachant que la  
perte d’un témoin clé rendrait plus difficile pour la partie  
défenderesse de préparer sa cause. Conjuguée à cette  
difficulté, la signification tardive des documents que les  
défenderesses comptent maintenant utiliser pour contester  
les revendications de la demanderesse fait pencher la balance  
en faveur des défenderesses.  
On m’a convaincue que le préjudice pouvant être subi par la  
partie défenderesse si elle devait procéder ce matin  
l’emporte sur le préjudice causé à la demanderesse par  
l’octroi d’un bref ajournement. Toutefois, je ne suis pas  
disposée à ajourner l’affaire jusqu’en 2021, comme les  
défenderesses l’ont demandé pour assurer la participation de  
leur témoin non disponible en ce moment. Les défenderesses  
n’ont présenté aucune preuve, dans le cadre de l’une ou  
l’autre motion en ajournement, démontrant la nécessité de  
reporter le procès en 2021. Fixer le plus tôt possible les  
nouvelles dates d’audience est la meilleure façon de limiter  
le préjudice causé à la demanderesse. La motion des  
défenderesses en ajournement du procès est accueillie, en  
vertu de la règle 54.02, les dépens devant suivre l’issue de la  
cause. Le procès se déroulera les 25, 26 et 27 août 2020.  
[par. 11, 13 et 14]  
[37]  
La décision de la juge saisie des motions ne renferme rien qui constituerait  
une erreur du type qui justifierait l’intervention en appel par application de la norme de  
contrôle pertinente. Il est évident qu’elle a compris et pris en considération les effets de  
l’incapacité de Louis Bertrand de témoigner. Je rejetterais ce moyen d’appel.  
- 14 -  
B.  
Deuxième moyen : omission de tenir dûment compte de la déposition de  
Louis Bertrand à l’interrogatoire préalable  
[38]  
[39]  
Compte tenu des décisions de la juge relatives aux demandes d’ajournement  
et de la non-disponibilité ostensible du témoin, du consentement des deux parties, la  
déposition de l’interrogatoire préalable de Louis Bertrand a été utilisée au procès.  
Les deux parties conviennent que les tribunaux doivent tenir compte des  
circonstances de la conclusion d’un contrat lorsqu’ils l’interprètent. Dans l’arrêt Sattva  
Capital Corp. c. Creston Moly Corp., 2014 CSC 53, [2014] 2 R.C.S. 633, la Cour suprême  
a écrit que l’interprétation d’un contrat est, de par sa nature, axée sur les faits :  
La tendance à délaisser l’approche historique au Canada  
semble s’expliquer par deux changements. Le premier est  
l’adoption d’une méthode d’interprétation contractuelle qui  
oblige le tribunal à tenir compte des circonstances — que  
l’on appelle souvent le fondement factuel — dans  
l’interprétation d’un contrat écrit (Hall, p. 13, 21-25 et 127;  
J. D. McCamus, The Law of Contracts (2e éd. 2012),  
p. 749-751). Le deuxième découle des explications  
formulées dans les arrêts Canada (Directeur des enquêtes et  
recherches) c. Southam Inc., [1997] 1 R.C.S. 748, par. 35, et  
Housen c. Nikolaisen, 2002 CSC 33, [2002] 2 R.C.S. 235,  
par. 26 et 31-36, sur ce qui distingue la question de droit de  
la question mixte de fait et de droit.  
Relativement au premier changement, l’interprétation des  
contrats a évolué vers une démarche pratique, axée sur le bon  
sens plutôt que sur des règles de forme en matière  
d’interprétation. La question prédominante consiste à  
discerner « l’intention des parties et la portée de l’entente »  
(Jesuit Fathers of Upper Canada c. Cie d’assurance  
Guardian du Canada, 2006 CSC 21, [2006] 1 R.C.S. 744,  
par. 27, le juge LeBel; voir aussi Tercon Contractors Ltd. c.  
Colombie-Britannique (Transports et Voirie), 2010 CSC 4,  
[2010] 1 R.C.S. 69, par. 64-65, le juge Cromwell). Pour ce  
faire, le décideur doit interpréter le contrat dans son  
ensemble, en donnant aux mots y figurant le sens ordinaire  
et grammatical qui s’harmonise avec les circonstances dont  
les parties avaient connaissance au moment de la conclusion  
du contrat. Par l’examen des circonstances, on reconnaît  
- 15 -  
qu’il peut être difficile de déterminer l’intention  
contractuelle à partir des seuls mots, car les mots en soi n’ont  
pas un sens immuable ou absolu :  
[TRADUCTION] Aucun contrat n’est conclu dans  
l’abstrait : les contrats s’inscrivent toujours dans un  
contexte. [. . .] Lorsqu’un contrat commercial est en  
cause, le tribunal devrait certes connaître son objet  
sur le plan commercial, ce qui présuppose d’autre  
part une connaissance de l’origine de l’opération, de  
l’historique, du contexte, du marché dans lequel les  
parties exercent leurs activités.  
(Reardon Smith Line, p. 574, le lord Wilberforce).  
Le sens des mots est souvent déterminé par un certain  
nombre de facteurs contextuels, y compris l’objet de  
l’entente et la nature des rapports créés par celle-ci (voir  
Moore Realty Inc. c. Manitoba Motor League, 2003 MBCA  
71, 173 Man. R. (2d) 300, par. 15, la juge Hamilton; voir  
aussi Hall, p. 22; McCamus, p. 749-750). Pour reprendre les  
propos du lord Hoffmann dans Investors Compensation  
Scheme Ltd. c. West Bromwich Building Society, [1998]  
1 All E.R. 98 (H.L.) :  
[TRADUCTION] Le sens d’un document (ou toute  
autre déclaration) qui est transmis à la personne  
raisonnable n’équivaut pas au sens des mots qui le  
composent. Le sens des mots fait intervenir les  
dictionnaires et les grammaires; le sens du document  
représente ce qu’il est raisonnable de croire que les  
parties, en employant ces mots compte tenu du  
contexte pertinent, ont voulu exprimer. [p. 115]  
[...]  
Certes, cette mise en garde a été formulée dans le contexte  
d’une action pour négligence, mais elle s’applique  
également à mon avis à l’interprétation contractuelle.  
Comme je le mentionne précédemment, le but de  
l’interprétation contractuelle — déterminer l’intention  
objective des parties — est, de par sa nature même, axé sur  
les faits. Le rapport étroit qui existe entre, d’une part, le  
choix et l’application des principes d’interprétation  
contractuelle et, d’autre part, l’interprétation que recevra  
l’instrument juridique en dernière analyse fait en sorte que  
rares seront les cas où il sera possible de dégager une  
- 16 -  
question de droit de l’exercice d’interprétation. En l’absence  
d’une erreur de droit du genre de celles décrites plus haut,  
aucun droit d’appel de l’interprétation par un arbitre d’un  
contrat n’est prévu à lAA. [par. 46 à 48 et 55].  
[40]  
[41]  
Les appelantes soutiennent que le juge de première instance a  
[TRADUCTION] « largement ignoré » le témoignage de Louis Bertrand et n’a fait  
référence qu’aux éléments de preuve qui étaient compatibles avec le témoignage que  
Randy Stairs a fait au procès.  
Selon les appelantes, le juge de première instance n’avait à sa disposition  
que la déposition de l’interrogatoire préalable de Louis Bertrand qu’il a apprécié au regard  
du témoignage que Randy Stairs a fait au procès. Les appelantes affirment que le juge de  
première instance a privilégié le témoignage de Randy Stairs sur essentiellement toutes les  
questions importantes, notamment : (1) l’approbation [TRADUCTION] « non verbale » de  
Louis Bertrand du prix; et (2) les contextes différents du devis de 2017 et de l’entente de  
2018.  
[42]  
Les appelantes soutiennent que le juge de première instance n’a pas tenu  
compte du témoignage de Louis Bertrand sur tous les points pertinents et a privilégié celui  
de Randy Stairs sans entreprendre une évaluation de la crédibilité de Louis Bertrand. Selon  
les appelantes, étant donné que l’ajournement n’a pas été accordé et que le témoin clé n’a  
pas pu témoigner, le juge de première instance aurait dû fournir des motifs convaincants et  
détaillés pour rejeter le témoignage de Louis Bertrand. Les appelantes affirment que, selon  
la preuve, Randy Stairs avait garanti un prix maximum de 90 000 $, qu’il n’avait proposé  
12,50 $ la tonne de sol supplémentaire qu’après avoir facturé 90 000 $ et qu’il avait  
renoncé à l’exclusion relative au terrain instable parce qu’il avait affaire à un sol sur lequel  
il avait travaillé en 2012. Les appelantes affirment que le juge de première instance n’a  
analysé aucun des éléments de preuve apportés par M. Bertrand qui étaient contraires à la  
position de Stairs. Par conséquent, la décision ne commande aucune déférence et est  
entachée d’une erreur manifeste et dominante.  
- 17 -  
[43]  
[44]  
[45]  
L’examen du dossier n’indique pas que le juge de première instance a omis  
d’analyser comme il le devait la preuve dont il disposait. À mon avis, il a fourni une analyse  
détaillée de tous ces éléments de preuve. Dans les circonstances, la déposition de  
l’interrogatoire préalable de Louis Bertrand constituait la seule preuve apportée par ce  
dernier susceptible d’être prise en considération. L’acceptation par le juge de certains  
éléments de preuve plutôt que d’autres soulève une question de fait et doit faire l’objet d’un  
contrôle suivant la norme de l’erreur manifeste et dominante.  
Les appelantes font également valoir que la décision du juge de première  
instance est susceptible de contrôle suivant la norme de la décision correcte, le juge ayant  
omis de respecter la règle énoncée dans l’arrêt Browne c. Dunn lorsqu’il a privilégié le  
témoignage de Stairs à celui des appelantes sans avoir eu l’avantage d’entendre le  
témoignage direct de Louis Bertrand. En toute déférence, je ne suis pas du même avis.  
Rappelons que les parties ont convenu de verser la déposition de l’interrogatoire préalable  
de Louis Bertrand au dossier au début du procès.  
La règle énoncée dans l’arrêt Browne c. Dunn, [1893] J.C.J. No. 5 (QL),  
n’est pas applicable. Les appelantes invoquent l’arrêt Shephard c. R., 2019 NBCA 76,  
[2019] A.N.-B. no 313 (QL). À mon avis, la présente affaire se distingue de l’affaire  
Shephard. Louis Bertrand n’a pas témoigné au procès. Les parties ont convenu d’utiliser la  
déposition de son interrogatoire préalable. À aucun moment durant le témoignage de Randy  
Stairs au procès, l’avocat des appelantes ne s’est opposé à aucune de ses déclarations au  
sujet de ses discussions avec Louis Bertrand pendant son interrogatoire principal. Je  
rejetterais ce moyen d’appel.  
C.  
Troisième moyen : clause contractuelle implicite  
[46]  
Les appelantes soutiennent que le contrat intervenu entre les parties était un  
contrat à prix fixe et que le prix couvrait l’excavation et l’enlèvement du terrain instable.  
Elles soutiennent que le juge de première instance a conclu que le contrat intervenu entre  
- 18 -  
les parties comportait une clause implicite, permettant à Stairs de réclamer un montant  
supplémentaire pour l’enlèvement et le remplacement du terrain instable.  
[47]  
[48]  
[49]  
Des clauses implicites peuvent être introduites dans un contrat sur le  
fondement de l’existence : (1) de la coutume ou de l’usage; (2) en tant que particularités  
juridiques d’une catégorie ou d’un type particuliers de contrats; ou (3) « “d’une intention  
présumée des parties, soit la condition implicite dont l’introduction est nécessaire pour  
donner à un contrat de l’efficacité commerciale ou pour permettre de quelque autre manière  
de satisfaire au critère de ‘l’observateur objectif’, [condition] dont les parties diraient, si  
on leur posait la question, qu’elles avaient évidemment tenu son inclusion pour acquise” » :  
Briggs c. Fermes Semences Desjardins Seed Farms Ltd./Ltée, 2019 NBCA 2, [2019]  
A.N.-B. no 2 (QL), au par. 16.  
Les appelantes soutiennent que le juge de première instance n’a pas  
appliqué ces principes correctement et qu’il a commis une erreur de droit en concluant que  
l’exclusion du terrain instable faisait implicitement partie de l’entente de 2018. À titre  
subsidiaire, les appelantes affirment que le juge de première instance a commis une erreur  
manifeste et dominante en ne tenant pas compte du témoignage présenté par Louis Bertrand  
affirmant le contraire. Je ne suis pas du même avis. Le juge de première instance a conclu  
que la clause d’exclusion qui faisait partie du devis de 2017 faisait partie du contrat  
intervenu entre les parties; il n’était donc pas nécessaire d’introduire une telle clause  
implicite. Elle existait déjà.  
Sonny Phillips a été déclaré expert en matière de gestion de projets de  
construction et de marchés de travaux de construction. Il a été entendu comme témoin pour  
Stairs. M. Phillips a déclaré qu’il est de pratique courante dans l’industrie de considérer  
qu’une clause d’exclusion relative à l’enlèvement et au remplacement du terrain instable  
fait implicitement partie du contrat entre les parties lorsque l’entrepreneur ne dispose pas  
d’un rapport géotechnique. Agir autrement ferait courir un risque inconnu à l’entrepreneur  
puisque la présence et la quantité de terrain instable seraient inconnues (décision de  
- 19 -  
première instance, par. 69). Cela dissuaderait les entrepreneurs d’accepter un contrat à prix  
fixe en l’absence d’un rapport géotechnique.  
[50]  
Le juge de première instance a conclu que, compte tenu de la connaissance  
qu’avait Stairs du bien et en particulier du fait que celui-ci comportait du terrain instable,  
la clause d’exclusion contenue dans le devis de 2017 était très importante pour Stairs  
Building (par. 68). De plus, le juge a conclu qu’il ne serait pas raisonnable pour Stairs de  
s’engager dans un contrat à prix fixe alors qu’elle était au courant de la présence de terrain  
instable sur le bien (par. 72).  
[51]  
Le juge de première instance a estimé que la clause d’exclusion contenue  
dans le devis de 2017 faisait partie du contrat intervenu entre les parties et a donc conclu  
que Stairs n’avait pas accepté un contrat à prix fixe, ce que prétendaient les appelantes. La  
pratique au sein de l’industrie voulant qu’une clause d’exclusion soit implicitement  
introduite dans un contrat en l’absence d’un rapport géotechnique pour l’entrepreneur était  
une preuve supplémentaire appuyant le fait que Stairs n’aurait pas accepté un contrat à prix  
fixe dans les circonstances (par. 65 et 69).  
[52]  
Stairs soutient que le juge de première instance n’a pas introduit une clause  
d’exclusion dans le contrat intervenu entre les parties, car Stairs avait déjà exclu  
l’excavation et l’enlèvement du terrain instable dans son devis écrit de 2017, qui, selon le  
juge de première instance, faisait partie du contrat intervenu entre les parties (par. 65).  
[53]  
[54]  
Le contrat prévoyait clairement une augmentation potentielle du prix dans  
l’éventualité où le terrain serait instable. Cela n’est pas contesté et le juge a interprété la  
preuve en conséquence.  
Les appelantes font valoir qu’il s’agissait d’un contrat à prix fixe (prix  
garanti) et que la clause du contrat relative à l’exclusion dans l’éventualité où le terrain  
serait instable doit être écartée parce que Louis Bertrand n’a accepté aucune augmentation  
dans le coût. Je ne souscris pas à cette prétention. Un rapport a été préparé par Gemtec, à  
- 20 -  
la connaissance des deux parties, précisément pour trancher cette question, et il a confirmé  
la présence de terrain instable. Selon Randy Stairs, l’ingénieur, M. Kalaba, a passé en revue  
le rapport avec Louis Bertrand et lui-même. C’est à ce moment-là que le prix de 12,50 $  
par tonne a été convenu. Louis Bertrand a nié ce fait à l’interrogatoire préalable, bien qu’il  
ait été présent sur le chantier tout au long des travaux d’excavation et de remplacement des  
granulats. De plus, il a témoigné avoir dit à Randy Stairs de suivre l’avis et les instructions  
de Gemtec, dont l’ingénieur a témoigné au procès pour les appelantes. Il n’existe aucun  
élément de preuve permettant d’admettre que ce travail supplémentaire aurait été fait  
gratuitement. Stairs n’aurait pas procédé sans l’approbation de Louis Bertrand (le  
[TRADUCTION] « signe de tête »). C’est ainsi qu’ils avaient traditionnellement fait  
affaire.  
[55]  
[56]  
Je ne décèle aucune erreur manifeste et dominante justifiant l’intervention  
en appel et je rejetterais ce moyen d’appel.  
D.  
Quatrième moyen : inversion de la charge de la preuve  
Les appelantes soutiennent que le juge de première instance leur a imposé  
le fardeau de réfuter les dommages-intérêts revendiqués par Stairs. Elles affirment avoir  
noté diverses divergences entre la quantité de granulats que Stairs affirmait avoir livrée et  
les bordereaux fournis par Matt Harris & Son Ltd. indiquant la quantité de granulats  
effectivement livrée. Elles soutiennent que le juge de première instance les a blâmées parce  
que, dans leurs plaidoiries, [TRADUCTION] « la demande n’est pas contestée au motif  
que M. Stairs n’est pas en mesure d’effectuer avec exactitude le rapprochement de chacune  
des charges livrées à partir de la gravière de M. Harris » (par. 82), ignorant ainsi la règle  
selon laquelle le montant des dommages-intérêts est toujours contesté à moins d’être admis  
spécifiquement. Selon les appelantes, le juge de première instance a également conclu qu’il  
leur incombait de réfuter les dommages-intérêts déclarés par Stairs, puis a écarté leur  
habilité à [TRADUCTION] « aller au-delà » des factures parce qu’elles maintenaient qu’il  
s’agissait d’un contrat à prix fixe.  
- 21 -  
[57]  
Stairs a présenté des factures établies par Matt Harris & Son Ltd., la  
fournisseuse de gravier, qui indiquaient, entre autres choses, la quantité de granulats  
achetée par Stairs pour le chantier. Les factures indiquent qu’un total de 12 825 tonnes de  
granulats ont été vendues à Stairs pour le chantier, dont 7 825 tonnes ont été utilisées pour  
remplacer le terrain instable. Stairs a également présenté en preuve divers bordereaux de  
livraison fournis par Matt Harris & Son Ltd. pour confirmer ses factures afférentes aux  
granulats. Le juge de première instance a conclu : [TRADUCTION] « On peut faire le suivi  
de la majeure partie de la somme réclamée au moyen des divers bordereaux et registres  
fournis par M. Harris » (par. 43).  
[58]  
M. Phillips a déclaré dans son témoignage que le devis de 2017 était bas et  
constituait un prix très raisonnable pour entreprendre le travail. Il a également témoigné  
que le prix de 12,50 $ par tonne pour remplacer et compacter le terrain instable était un  
prix raisonnable. Cette preuve n’a pas été contestée au procès. Le juge de première instance  
a conclu que les travaux supplémentaires effectués par Stairs étaient nécessaires pour  
réaliser le projet.  
[59]  
L’examen du dossier révèle que les propos du juge de première instance  
n’ont pas imposé aux appelantes la charge de réfuter les dommages-intérêts réclamés par  
Stairs. Les appelantes n’ont pas prétendu dans l’exposé de la défense qu’elles ont déposé  
que les coûts supplémentaires réclamés par Stairs étaient excessifs. De plus, le juge de  
première instance s’est demandé si Stairs était tenue de fournir les bordereaux de livraison  
en plus des factures pour prouver ses dommages-intérêts, puisque les factures contenaient  
l’information nécessaire pour quantifier la réclamation en dommages-intérêts.  
[60]  
Les conclusions du juge de première instance n’ont pas inversé la charge de  
la preuve de sorte à obliger les appelantes à réfuter la quantification par Stairs de ses  
dommages-intérêts. Je rejetterais ce moyen d’appel.  
- 22 -  
Cinquième moyen : l’interprétation  
E.  
[61]  
Les appelantes font valoir que le juge de première instance a commis une  
erreur dans son interprétation du contrat. Elles affirment que la décision est susceptible  
d’infirmation, soit suivant la norme de la décision correcte soit suivant celle de l’erreur  
manifeste et dominante, parce que le juge de première instance n’a pas tenu compte des  
circonstances de la conclusion du contrat. Elles soutiennent que le juge de première  
instance a fait fi de ce qui suit :  
a.  
b.  
c.  
Le témoignage de M. Bertrand selon lequel M. Stairs avait [TRADUCTION]  
« garanti » que son prix ne dépasserait pas 90 000 $;  
Le témoignage de M. Bertrand selon lequel M. Stairs ne lui a proposé 12,50 $  
la tonne qu’après avoir facturé 90 000 $ aux appelantes;  
Le témoignage de M. Bertrand selon lequel Stairs a donné son devis de 2017  
en novembre pour un projet différent, mais que l’entente de 2018 a été conclue  
pendant l’été, la date d’achèvement envisagée tombant avant la saison froide,  
et pour des travaux dans un sol dans lequel Stairs avait travaillé en 2012.  
[62]  
À mon avis, ce moyen semble reprendre les deuxième et troisième moyens.  
Pour les motifs susmentionnés, je conclus que le juge de première instance n’a pas commis  
d’erreur dans l’interprétation du contrat intervenu entre les parties. Je ne décèle aucune  
erreur qui justifierait l’intervention en appel suivant soit la norme de la décision correcte  
soit celle de l’erreur manifeste et dominante. Je rejetterais ce moyen d’appel.  
- 23 -  
VII. Dispositif  
[63]  
Je rejetterais l’appel avec dépens de 3 000 $.  



© 2019 IncJournal is not affiliated with or endorsed by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission